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10 minutes ago, Gordon_M said:

Interesting cab construction, if a lot of work to pull down and put back after all these years.  The US version of the cab is one welded assembly, which means it maintains a lot of structural strength and you can hack out and replace bits with wondering if it will still fit.

I expected a welded single piece unit as well Gordon,

I wonder if it's a pre-war design feature on Canadian civilian models to allow for construction of perhaps 1 ton panel vans using the same scuttle and front end sheet metal throughout the range ?? .

 Fortunately there are no major repairs needed to the cab main structures, it's just some tin work in various place so it shouldn't need to get hot enough to distort anything. 

I too was wary about removing the hinge pins with the risk of mashing up the door post if they proved stubborn however the door posts are sound and with a little heat and carefully balancing of the weight of the door on the crane they knocked out with no problem but I can see that if the pins are rusted and the knurling is tight in the top of the hinge there could be issues. 

Pete

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Those cabs were always available as kits Pete, since the start of Mound Road production for the 39 series.  You could get a chassis with cowl, windscreen cowl, or cab as I remember, but they would primarily be intended for coach builders to build them up, rather than as a kit for assembly of a cab overseas.

 

I'd guess the cab rear, floor, and windscreen pillar joints were engineered for this series of trucks.

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Posted (edited)

Left and right fuel tanks and bracketry have been removed along with the chequer plate tank shields a feature of the water tank version of the D15 done to prevent damage to the fuel tanks by the operating crew when filling the water tank. 

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Both tanks seem to be externaly in good condition and both hold a small amount of very smelly old fuel so there is a possibility they made be usable after draining and steam cleaning the issue may be with corroded pick pipes but all that’s for another day.

  The two half of the cab (as described in a previous post) have now been separated and will be lifted off the frame and stored awaiting their turn for repair and then media cleaning.

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During the work to remove the cab bolts it was necessary to remove the rifle butts from the rear corners of the cab floor I assumed that they would be like similar Canadian and British fittings routed out of a solid piece of wood however once the dirt was removed it turns out they are open ended the bottom is closed off with a form of thick rubberized canvas? or perhaps rubberized asbestos? .  They appear to be original and never to have been removed the bases are the same rubberized material that formed the draft seal on the pedals and steering tube.  Small detail but not come across this type of rifle butt holder before,........ has anyone else seen something similar?

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Pete

Edited by Pete Ashby

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It’s been a bit damp of late here in the Wild West so I spent a bit of time on a wet afternoon continuing to strip the Dodge.

The side step brackets are now removed from both sides and in preparation for the removal of the gearbox the prop shaft was removed also the exhaust silencer and pipe taken off to give a bit more room for manoeuvre.

With the cab roof removed and the floor sections split and pushed out of the way there was room to use the crane to remove the gearbox so I left the top of the gear box and shifter stick in position, if this job was to be done with the cab in place the gearbox top and stick would have to be removed, the box supported from below and then lowered away using the trolley jack and cradle.

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The gearbox and PTO safely out on the floor, no nasty surprise here, the splines and flywheel spigot look very clean with no obvious ware so the input shaft was wrapped in a rag and tapped closed to keep the muck and grit out and unit was put aside to be cleaned, stripped and inspected when work on the mechanical units starts.

 

The engagement control for the power pump PTO which is used to fill the water tank is an interesting detail.  The engagement control is a small handle underneath the right hand dash board all very civilized and neat instead of a leaver sticking up out of the floor.

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 The handle is connected via a solid wire running in an armoured cable to the PTO so that by pushing the handle in the PTO dog is engaged with the truck gear box. 

 The truck RPM is automatically limited on the carburetor via another cable attached to the same fulcrum lever on the PTO  this is so that the power pump cannot be over speeded and damaged.   I wonder do British water trucks have a similar operating mechanism that limits engine speed?. 

Control cables for PTO.JPG

Sadly the power pump and limiter on the carb are missing from this truck but all the operating cables are intact and in good condition so who knows?  One day I may find the power pump drive shaft and carb limiter.

With the gearbox out the next job was to remove the steering column from the frame and then take off the last of the body brackets so that the scuttle could be moved back from the engine and laid flat on the frame along with the cab back and roof sections.   These three units will be lifted off the frame and stored awaiting their turn for repair.  So after all that and several mugs of tea the truck now looks like this:

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The next task will be to strip the engine of all its ancillary units prior to lifting out of the frame.

Pete

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
missing photo and cut and past nonsense

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Hi Pete,

I am currently in the process of restoring a Dodge T110L, I have ended up importing a replacement engine from the states, (unfortunately this also requires rebuilding but that's another story) this engine had some sort of governor on the carb which may be what you are missing, I will take Some photos over the next couple of weeks and post on here.

Kevin

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Hello Kevin the T110L project sounds very interesting are you going to run a blog on it here on HMVF ? a lot of people would be interested in following it.

The governor sounds interesting I'd very much like to see some photos of it and indeed the whole truck if that's possible.

where in the world are you by the way ?

regards

Pete 

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Location Maastricht, The Netherlands!

Dodge.thumb.jpg.5fe8735bc1087ff1c7e890a6058e3c3c.jpg

Cheers,

Danny

 

 

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Hi Pete, I am in Suffolk, I may put some pics and details on a blog.

The replacement engine came out of a Fire engine complete with the manifolds and ancillaries, I am in the process of rebuilding the engine at the moment, I will try and get the pictures next weekend if all goes to plan.

Kevin

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