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Tiny Tim battery charger

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Ive got what I believe is a Tiny Tim battery charger in my workshop. Ive been told they were used by the military in Tanks, is that right? If so what vehicles would it haven been used in. We have had it running but there are a few bits missing from the charging system. Any info would be of great interest.

 

Thanks,

Dean

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Hi, Dean.......I have been looking for one of these units for my display, so I can at least tell you that they were used by Royal Signals units during the Normandy campaign for recharging radio batteries.  They were carried on a variety of RS vehicles.  But I am sure their application was very diverse.  

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I wasn't aware they were used by the Royal Signals or during WW2. There are some serial numbers on it, would be great if it could be dated.

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Tiny Tims were used late war in tanks, Churchill, Cromwell, Comet, etc.  There was a metal lid that fitted over the top on tank ones.

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I would have expected the Canadian manufactured 300 watt Chorehorse Generator to have been the standard vehicle fit for Royal Signal vehicles.  I don't recall seeing Tiny Tims in stowage diagrams for non-armoured applications but may be wrong.

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Hi Dean,

I have 3 Tiny Tims in running order with a 4th that I am currently restoring.They are all 12v 300watts, I believe that some were also made as 24v units.There are several videos of these units on Youtube which might help you,also there are entries on an American forum -Smokstak - which are useful.

Thay were made by Continental Motors corp,Muskegon,Mich.,USA.

I have been advised that they were  used as auxillary engines in Allied tanks during WW2 to charge up the main engine batteries and to power the radios.

There are various 'manuals' about which give basic information .

Hope that helps you a little.

All the best,

Kev.

 

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Many thanks for the replies. Ive done a bit of searching online but haven't found any pictures of one fitted in a tank.

There seems to be some variation in design, i'm guessing there were maybe post or pre-war designs too?. Are there any features or something to look for that means it could be identified as a WW2 item?

Its a nice bit of kit to go with my stationary engines, I wouldn't fancy carrying it any distance though, its a lump of a thing.

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13 hours ago, REME 245 said:

I would have expected the Canadian manufactured 300 watt Chorehorse Generator to have been the standard vehicle fit for Royal Signal vehicles.  I don't recall seeing Tiny Tims in stowage diagrams for non-armoured applications but may be wrong.

I have a book (The Secret Wireless War) that lists equipment carried by the British Special Communications/Liaison Units post Normandy that handled the secret Ultra traffic.  This included a Tiny Tim for battery charging and an American Onan for generating power.  But their kit was specialised and included radio gear not issued to the Army, for example.  Although I said Royal Signals, they were composite units and included Intelligence Corps officers and other specialists.  The vehicles included stripped out Dodge WC 54s for use in the American sector and Guy 15cwt wireless vans in the British sector!

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43 minutes ago, REME 245 said:

I have an 1250 watt Onan for sale if you can identify the type.

I just wanted a Tiny Tim to go in the WC54.  I think the Onan would have been carried by the unit's GS trucks as I think its quite a big/heavy bit of kit?  No idea what type it was.

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