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Sand Blasting Paint

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Having read a lot on this and other sites I seem to see sand blasting to remove paint and rust is a good procedure.

Not having much needing to be done at one time can any one recommend a kit, for a reasonable amount that I can use for occasional use, I have used a wire brush, hand and power drill, but does not clean as well.

The materials are mainly metal and occasionally wood

Thanks in advance

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I have yet to find something as good as sandblasting that will give a 'brand new' finish in such a short time. I will try to take some pics of the blasters i use to give you an idea.

I recently refurbed a gearbox for a friend. It took 30 mins to get back to metal, 30 mins to etch prime. Next day two coats of engine blue. Job done, all in all, 3 hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You can usually get cheapish sandblast guns from ebay but remember they do need quite high free air volume and 50psi pressure and above. If your compressor can run a paint gun then you'll be off to a good start.

Many blast media are available, some vicious and some very gentle. Tinwork though has a habit of exhibiting tinworm after blasting. I live on the coast and have used sieved dried beach sand on motorcycle frames with success. Face masks are very necessary.

Have a go - trial and error for a minimal outlay will give you a good idea of how it can help you. And don't forget to have primer handy as ferrous components will start to oxidise straight off - nice dry warm sunny day is best. Need to get primer on within about 20 minutes.

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Then finish in whatever colour is required.

I didn't take a pic with the shiny new discs attached, should have done to show completion.

 

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I bought myself a blasting cabinet a couple of years ago , I think it is Sealey branded & has proved very useful for smaller stuff although visibility can be a bit of a problem peering through the window . As already said , you do need a good compressor as any blaster is air hungry ! 

By the way , I believe that it's no longer permissible to use ordinary sand for blasting . Silica and lungs don't get on well !

Edited by snowtracdave

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I totally agree with decauville's sentiments exactly. I use kiln dried sand from BnQ, its around 4quid a bag, and half a bag did the full gearbox into every nook and cranny !

Blow of with an air line, prime straight away.

I did a full engine last week with same result !

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I use a Azenda suction container gun , made in Italy & no longer imported. The bore of the hardened steel nozzels wear - that requires more , so I add a Hydrovane  compressor to boost the BroomWade  10 cfm comp / receiver  and work at 15 cfm FAD.  Single phase 3 hp motor   (quite a FLC starting on a 40 amp long lead circuit)- I run continuous on air-governor , the smaller motor abt. 2 hp I run on auto.  So using a domestic single-phase - take care.

Fortunately I purchased several nozzels as spares , when they wear out I will turn / screwcut some from silver steel.

I just use cheap kiln dried patio sand , you can re-cycle once but it is not quite as sharp ,  3rd pass - next to useless.  I use good breathing masks.

I think the Sealey better gun for abt. £40 will be comparable.  The secret is lots and lots of air at pressure, I could probably add my other Hydrovane as  2nd booster.

A unworn nozzel bore will be abt. 6mm dia.  a worn one presently - I stop using at 8mm approx. due to air consumption. 

Dry rust on a chassis - soon removed -  SA 2.5  (white metal)  ,  however - sound chassis paint - that is difficult , possible but takes time and lots of air and that is  £   (before I retired I had good contacts to get large items blasted for £ gratis).  Now -  rust / loose paint - ..I use good needle-scalers and just sweep-blast. DIY blasting  - expensive to get good efficient kit ,  much more than what I need, then it is a tractor & 2 tool compressor.

House  - location . location , location

Blasting -  air, air air

Be warned  - fresh air is free - until you compress it  LoL

 

 

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There is a photo of the breathing apparatus i use here.

Its powered by an extra feed from the compressor through an 'air breath filter' on the separate regulator. This feeds clean air into the mask. Its all very cheap to put together.

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thanks dale.

might be a change of plan with the oil tank/ i am considering molasses instead

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While out metal detecting last year I found this lump hammer, the only reason I held on to it was that I could just make out the ''Crows Foot'' arrow, it looked like a chunk of rust.  A month soaking in 1 part molasses to 9 part water mix ,this is the result.          A lot more info became apparent also the hardened tips showed up. It will not shift paint but does get rid of rust. I am thinking about using it on the GMC fuel tank. Thanks QB

 

IMG_0565.JPG

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2 hours ago, fire ball red said:

While out metal detecting last year I found this lump hammer, the only reason I held on to it was that I could just make out the ''Crows Foot'' arrow, it looked like a chunk of rust.  A month soaking in 1 part molasses to 9 part water mix ,this is the result.          A lot more info became apparent also the hardened tips showed up. It will not shift paint but does get rid of rust. I am thinking about using it on the GMC fuel tank. Thanks QB

 

IMG_0565.JPG

I can't view all the hammer but the shape  + length of the hex. ,  it may be a railway plate-layers , used for hammering rail timber chocks, these often had unequal lenths about the shaft-hole but still in balance.  IIRC  a wheel-tappers hammer was similar , equal but lighter in weight.

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Thinking about it , it may be a platelayers 'key' hammer , possibly for the metal spring type keys. The timber chock key IIRC the hex end would be shorther and the long end was sort of a oval shape with rounded corners for whacking the timber chocks in.   I think this must have been a dual purpose hammer for both timber chock & spring key as both still in use. I have seen one before , just can't recall exactly .  I served my time in a railways workshops and it could be a blacksmiths sledge , normally a striker would use one with much more weight (the bulk of the mass in right place for a vertical blow , a normal sledge is more universal for any blow)..  Could even be a boilersmiths / riveters / holder-up tool.   It could even be stuck in memory from shipyards / dry-docks.   I actually have a small collection of rivetters hammers , they were still used in odd spots where a pneumatic hammer was not practicable  -  they are lighter and  equal at both ends , little variation in weight but quite a difference in shaft length.

Edited by ruxy

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That certainly doesn't look like any keying hammer that I have ever seen, and the shape makes it fundamentally unsuited to that task. A keying hammer has a long thin end in order to fit between the rail and chair,  that headwould not fit. Having said that, I am sure that I have seen just such a hammer fairly recently but I can't remember where or when.

Back on the subject of "sand blasting" please remember that it is both illegal and very foolish to blast with sand or any other medium containing more than 1% free silica. This is due to the high risk of contracting silicosis, a truly awful debilitating illness with no cure. It is prohibited under the COSHH Regulations, 1999. You must use proper, intended-for-the-purpose blast media. It is also highly advisable (essential in the workplace) to use an air-fed full face or full head mask or shield.

Remember also that the paint you are blasting into airborne dust may contain lead and other evil health hazards.

If you can get hold of one, a wet blast machine will give better results, is more versatile, much cleaner, and almost dust free (and therefore healthier) than a dry blaster. The downside is that typically a wet blast machine is around ten times the price of a dry blast machine.

Blasting is a great timesaver and really useful technique, but you want to live long enough to enjoy the results of your endeavours.

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What is the consensus on using sand as a blast medium when cleaning machinery, such as the gearbox shown above?  I know that you need to spend time blanking things off, but in the motorcycle world, people seem to be using blasting complete engines, etc, ( as opposed to components that can be cleaned off easily afterwards) with great caution and then only with media such as soda.

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Out of interest, has anyone used vapour blasting?  I've seen a place advertising it and wondered how successful it is.

Andy

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1 hour ago, matchlesswdg3 said:

What is the consensus on using sand as a blast medium when cleaning machinery, such as the gearbox shown above?  I know that you need to spend time blanking things off, but in the motorcycle world, people seem to be using blasting complete engines, etc, ( as opposed to components that can be cleaned off easily afterwards) with great caution and then only with media such as soda.

If by "sand" you really do mean sand, then don't do it, it is illegal and dangerous for the reasons stated above.

If your question is more generic and by "sand" you mean any safe solid abrasive blast media, then personally I would not do it. The blast media has a tendency to get into every nook and cranny and I personally feel that the risk of something highly abrasive getting into bearings etc is simply too great. I do know that others however seal up openings etc and seem to have trouble-free results, but that is not something I would risk.

I am fortunate enough to have a wet-blast machine which produces virtually no abrasive dust, one of several advantages of wet blasting. Even so, it is not something I would consider..

 

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I have a guyson, got it from ebay for £200 complete with an extractor. I just had to swop the 3 phase extractor motor for a 240 lump and it works a treat. I use crushed glass or walnut shell but I always degrease components and mask off the areas I don't want the media to go. The media will find grease where ever it is and it sticks like glue, you really do have to check and clean every nook and cranny or else you'll paint away and find you blast dust out all over your paint.

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