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Markwise

Morris Commercial MRA1 LPG fitted

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Although i am very fond of my MC MRA1 i am more a large lorry Guy.

so im putting the MRA1 up for sale. Open to offers in the area of 5700GBP or swap, for instance with Bedford MJ/MK, Leyland Daf, GMC CCKW, Ferret, anything is considered, (or Maybe a Ww2 bike)WHY?

The Morris is in excellent condition, with good functioning LPG installation which makes it cheap to drive, good looking interior, and is a rare dry air charging truck. So no troop benches in the back but angled cabinets. A bed inside for comfortable sleeping at shows. Se the extra pictures.

has featured in a magazine and can be found on the web as iT alway attracts a lot of attention. Year of build is 1952(although papers say 1942) and has a full dutch registration which makes it easy to register anywhere. I am willing do deliver it to a port near you.

This is a rare Dry Air Compressor version in very good shape!

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Edited by Markwise
added year of build and MJ/MK and LPG

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That is a nice looking truck, Mark. Do you have any photos or drawings that depict what the layout and fittings were/should be for a Welding truck? I have a few photos of Light Stone-painted Welder's MRA1s trundling around in Libya but none that give me a clue as to the interior of the 'cargo' bay. I bought the UHB, WO Code 17802 in the vain hope there would be much to see ..... no such luck as it doesn't cover any of the variants. Just the cargo truck and the chassis for the water truck.

In writing about Libya/Tripolitania and army equipment, I desire to do so from a very well informed stance. You may just be able to help me though I'm sorry to say that I'm not in the market to buy your lovely little lorry.

Lizzie.

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Lizzie there is a detailed description with photos & diagrams of the welding truck in EMER WHEELED VEHICLES P 440/1, 441/1, 442/1. Up until May 1960 this was issued as EMER VEHICLES GENERAL R 210/6, 211/6, 212/6

There are also similarly detailed sections on the dry air charging variant in EMER WV P 440/2 etc from EMER VG R 290/5 etc

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17 minutes ago, fv1609 said:

Lizzie there is a detailed description with photos & diagrams of the welding truck in EMER WHEELED VEHICLES P 440/1, 441/1, 442/1. Up until May 1960 this was issued as EMER VEHICLES GENERAL R 210/6, 211/6, 212/6

There are also similarly detailed sections on the dry air charging variant in EMER WV P 440/2 etc from EMER VG R 290/5 etc

Thank you Clive. Fantastic information for which I'm most grateful. You know what's coming next ......

If anyone has the above EMERS could they please photocopy/scan said info/diagrams/photos for me? All costs met. Hmmm, I bet there are no such EMERs for sale, not that I need the whole EMER. A search in a well known auction website came up with .... no EMERs.

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5 minutes ago, BlueBelle said:

Thank you Clive. Fantastic information for which I'm most grateful. You know what's coming next ......

The answer is yes I have & yes you can.

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2 minutes ago, fv1609 said:

The answer is yes I have & yes you can.

Wow! Thank you Clive. I'm 'on standby'. This is so exciting .... I might end up buying the truck as well! No, that's not an offer to buy the truck .... honestly. So easy to get carried away. To email then I guess, Clive and a BIG "Thank You" again.

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I have the full Technical Handbook for the MRA/1 chassis  & Supplement 1 for the 3 variants trouble is that is 223 pages & Mods 24 pages.

Welding 19 pages

Air charging 19 pages

Trouble is not just time/effort (I get quite a lot of requests for things) but getting it to you as I have no broadband. Upload can be very slow down to 10kbs at times. I imagine diagrams & photos are a must for the variants. Then perhaps also the Data Summaries, then anything specific you want me to look up in the way of technical details. Odd pages are doable depending on the propagation from my 4G yagi aimed at a hill that has a cell mast beyond, just a bit unpredictable.

PS Also have FVRDE Spec. 9501 Body, 1 Ton, GS, Cargo, (Morris). 1951

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Hello Bluebelle, i'll see what i can do. It's in in the shed now because of the winter, so not much light to take photgraphs.

@Clive: Inside is a plaque with instructions for first aid with electrical accidents and also a sign that says:

warning do not drive without the pole securely fastened. What does that tell you? Welding truck? Aircharger? Whats is the pole they are talking about? And what were aircharging trucks used for in the first place?

thanks!

Edited by Markwise

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i figured either that or filling air barrage balloons with Helium..

Edited by Markwise

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Engine starters - Tanks and Planes? No. Balloons? No. fill an air barrage balloon or any balloon with air and ..... see it stay on the ground. Unless it's hot air of course.

From CMV Autumn 2013 I have extracted the slightly re-written info below:

'The MRA1 'Dry air charging' (FV16103) was a conversion of the original cargo body by Strachans under contract 6/VEH/11579 for 29 vehicles. The body featured a Coventry Climax 4-cylinder engine driving a Reavell three-stage compressor mounted on a reinforced floor. The top edges of the front two body side panels and the forward bulkhead were extended upwards to allow the compressed air bottles (I say cylinders) and the associated pipework and control equipment to be supported. Two large cylinders were fitted each side, upright and clamped in, with another three smaller cylinders fitted over the wheel arches.

The dry air charging trucks were intended for use with the hydro-pneumatic  recuperator fitted on the 5.5" Howitzer. In 1958 there were five medium regiments equipped with the 5.5" Howitzer and each Battery REME section had such a vehicle issued, operated by REME Armourers ( I say, Gun Fitters as Armourers only 'did' little guns, personal weapons, section machine guns and maybe the 'little guns' fitted as co-axial machine guns on some vehicles)'.

I'm actually astonished they were using compressed air with its O2 content of 21% in an oily recuperator system. O2 under pressure with just a hint of a hydrocarbon material in or around the pressurised area can result in an explosion. Hence an inert, clean dry gas was 'normally', specifically Nitrogen as in say, suspension struts and so on. Some Howitzers of the same period seem to have had their recuperators charged with Nitrogen. Maybe someone on here knows more about recuperators on artillery pieces?

Here is another gas safety lesson for you: The valve outlets on 02 and Nitrogen gas cylinders are identical, as are the cylinders themselves. Colours are different but can sometimes be difficult to distinguish so, the only way to tell what's in your gas cylinder is to read (and understand) the labelling on the cylinder. A recuperator around 2005 had just been serviced on a Royal Artillery 105mm L118 Light Gun and the gun was put to use to target the enemy in Afghanistan. On firing, the gun exploded in the fire pit; fortunately the gun crew were not killed and the live ammunition in the gun pit seemingly did not detonate. The recuperator had been mistakenly filled with O2 instead of N2, the recuperator's grease recated with the O2 under recoil pressure ..... Boom! The video, stills and story were rapidly withdrawn but not before I saw them and 'captured' what I needed to. Similarly, a gas suspension strut under a jacked-up 100 ton coal dump truck which was in for servicing ('somewhere in Nottinghamshire') and on axle supports had O2 released into the strut instead of N2 and an immediate explosion resulted - the truck collapsed onto the mechanic. I won't show you the photo - it's my line of business to make people safe around compressed and cryogenic gas and equipment and, if they've not heeded me and not learned to apply the imparted knowledge and implement a 'safe system of work' , I sometimes get called back to tell them what went wrong. 

MRA1s are such dinky little trucks, even though they were 'hated' by their users in uniform.

 

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19 hours ago, wally dugan said:

"here you are"

 

FAB photos of the MRA1 'Dry air charging' (FV16103) Wally. I knew you'd be there! Thank you. :yay:

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Photo from another angle showing the layout of the air cylinders, in the description of the F.V.16103 in the Data Book of War Department G.S. B Vehicles dated 1960 it states that "There is in the order of 1 ft 6 in space available round the compressor" sorry about the quality of the photos 

20180223_204953.jpg

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1 hour ago, johnwardle said:

Photo from another angle showing the layout of the air cylinders, in the description of the F.V.16103 in the Data Book of War Department G.S. B Vehicles dated 1960 it states that "There is in the order of 1 ft 6 in space available round the compressor" sorry about the quality of the photos

Just the ticket John, thank you! Look at those angled corner lockers! I can't see if the air cylinders are sat in 'cups' to prevent the cylinder bases from sliding. Do you see them in your book? Is the photo you've taken a photo of the book or a scan?

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1 hour ago, BlueBelle said:

Just the ticket John, thank you! Look at those angled corner lockers! I can't see if the air cylinders are sat in 'cups' to prevent the cylinder bases from sliding. Do you see them in your book? Is the photo you've taken a photo of the book or a scan?

I took a photo from the book with my tablet, the cylinders are permanently fitted so they are not in cups. The full description is "There are two delivery points from the 10 air bottle reservoirs of which 4 are large bottles and 6 small. The bottles are clamped to the body sides and are permanently connected to each other and the engine. Cupboards are provided for accessories".

I was given this book a week ago and it is an absolute gold mine of information on 1950s & 60s soft skin vehicles, for example the average mpg for  this vehicle is 13.2!

 

 

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On 23/01/2018 at 6:46 PM, BlueBelle said:

That is a nice looking truck, Mark. Do you have any photos or drawings that depict what the layout and fittings were/should be for a Welding truck? I have a few photos of Light Stone-painted Welder's MRA1s trundling around in Libya but none that give me a clue as to the interior of the 'cargo' bay. I bought the UHB, WO Code 17802 in the vain hope there would be much to see ..... no such luck as it doesn't cover any of the variants. Just the cargo truck and the chassis for the water truck.

In writing about Libya/Tripolitania and army equipment, I desire to do so from a very well informed stance. You may just be able to help me though I'm sorry to say that I'm not in the market to buy your lovely little lorry.

Lizzie.

Hi Lizzie,  I must have missed this post, here is a photo of the load bed of a F.V.16104 Truck, 1 ton G.S. Welding, 4 x 4, MORRIS MRA1.

The description is " The plant is a 'Plant welding electric, single operator, engine driven, output 300/400 amps.' with a dropping characteristic. There are cupboards which hold the necessary items of welding kit and a portable table for use in the field.

The welding generator is bolted to the floor of the vehicle with the engine radiator at the tailboard so that maximum draught can be obtained.

 

20180223_234911.jpg

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On 23/02/2018 at 4:39 PM, johnwardle said:

I was given this book a week ago and it is an absolute gold mine of information on 1950s & 60s soft skin vehicles, for example the average mpg for  this vehicle is 13.2!

Hmm, I think I need to source a copy!

Thank you for posting, John.

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9 minutes ago, BlueBelle said:

Hmm, I think I need to source a copy!

Thank you for posting, John.

Hi Lizzie, pm me with a list of what vehicles that you are looking for and I will scan and e-mail them to you.

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On ‎23‎-‎2‎-‎2018 at 11:14 PM, BlueBelle said:

Just the ticket John, thank you! Look at those angled corner lockers! I can't see if the air cylinders are sat in 'cups' to prevent the cylinder bases from sliding. Do you see them in your book? Is the photo you've taken a photo of the book or a scan?

angled cornered lockers are still there

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On 26-2-2018 at 12:04 AM, johnwardle said:

Hi Lizzie, pm me with a list of what vehicles that you are looking for and I will scan and e-mail them to you.

Hello john, could you email me the ones of the Morris MRA1 please?

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4 hours ago, Markwise said:

Hello john, could you email me the ones of the Morris MRA1 please?

Hi Mark, which version would you like? G.S., Dry Air Charging, Welding or Water Tanker.

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On 12-3-2018 at 6:53 PM, johnwardle said:

Hi Mark, which version would you like? G.S., Dry Air Charging, Welding or Water Tanker.

Hi John, Dry Air Charging please!

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