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Ron

Royal Enfield ......Rare find

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Are you sure the gudgeon pin has the original diameter Ron? (3/4") I notice you want to replace the small end bush...

Jan

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As Jan is suggesting, if it is a Suzuki or Jap piston, the chances are the small end was crudely drilled oversize for the metric gudgeon pin.

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Chaps I've just miked up the gudgeon pin and it's definitely 3/4" and is 1/2 thou undersize in the wear area. I'll see if the new rings are correct when they arrive (later today knowing Hitchcock's) . Then I'll decide if the new small end bush can be reamed tight to allow for the 1/2 thou wear or I can buy a new gudgeon pin or even go for complete new piston (about 65 quid with post and VAT).

Yesterday after removing the valves and preparing the barrel/head ready for blasting,  I took the fork blades apart and de-greased them. For those who haven't seen them, these early RE forks come apart (unlike most which are brazed together) Which does make stripping the old paint easier. Ron

Ben 060.jpg

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Nice work as usual Ron....Noticed  this earlier pic ...is side stand same as Norton 16H ..never seen this before on an RE ?

 

ww2 bikes.jpg

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Yes Andy that picture is some of the very first WD/C's produced and had the same fieldstand foot as the Norton 16H. But I guess unlike Norton they soon realised how unsafe they are and liable to slide and reverted to the pig sticker type. No doubt Jan will know exactly when they changed. When panniers were fitted the pig sticker stand was moved from the vertical to horizontal. Ron

Edited by Ron

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The Norton style field stand was definitely used for the first WD/C contract C/5107, and was still listed in the second contract (C/5654) parts list. But I have the impression that they changed the field stand during (if not at the start of) the second contract. The French contract was built just after British contract C/5654, and as Rik pointed out (no pun intended), they definitely used the spike type field stand on the French bikes and all later WD/Cs.

Jan

DSCN3467.JPG

Edited by rewdco

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Thanks for that Jan.

Well Hitchcock's didn't let me down but Royal Mail certainly did! No post whatsoever yesterday, despite receiving an email and text from them to say they will be delivering another tracked parcel to me.......So that's that till Tuesday now.  Ron

 

 

Edited by Ron

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2 hours ago, Chris Hall said:

I don’t know why they bother with these alerts when they don’t actually deliver the goods when they state they will.

Its so the customer knows its been dispatched and the suppliers  can blame the royal mail for the delay!

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Stripped all the fork parts back to bare metal today. The black paint would easily pickle up if soaked in thinners for a few minutes, but the KG3 paint underneath didn't seem effected . From what I can make out, there is no primer/undercoat at all. Just a single coat of KG3 .......Must have been some good quality lead or enamel paint.:thumbsup: Ron 

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Hi Ron..when you say "red oxide" is that the real deal...... or a modern equivalent.Which make do you use please?

 

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Tha barrel, head, and tappet cover have been blasted and I've painted them with VHT and baked them for an hour. I've also lapped the valves in. The new piston rings arrived but no way will they fit this 'Gamma' piston, so coupled with the wear to the gudgeon pin, and the fact that the Japanese piston might upset the spirits in the museum,  I made an executive decision and ordered a new RE piston (minus rings). I've also pressed a new small end bush into the con-rod which now needs reaming to size when the new piston arrives.   Ron

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Ron, I doubt if it's actually a Suzuki piston.  If it was from a 2-stroke it would have pegged rings. Probably just an old proprietary French make - Probably a down-market version of 'Omega' pistons :-)

I think you're right to replace the whole thing.  Too many unknowns to use in a high-revving comp bike like the Model C !

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Tremendously interesting thread and appreciate the regular updates Ron. Well done chap !

Don't overlook Burton Bike Bits when sourcing RE parts. You can browse their stock on-line using part-numbers and they have a fair few rare RE spares - for example, only last year I managed to obtain some Flea throttle/grip tubes, plus flanges and twist-grip stops........worth a try......

Jan can probably answer this, but regarding early war RE's, are there any known WD/L's or WD/J's surviving......?

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1 hour ago, wdbikemad said:

Jan can probably answer this, but regarding early war RE's, are there any known WD/L's or WD/J's surviving......?

I don't have any WD/Js in my Register (not surprising really, as Enfield only supplied 6 of these to the RAF). But the Register does contain two surviving WD/Ls (complete ones) plus one engine.

Jan

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Yes I agree Rik. When I got the bore measured and honed, my engineer commented about what a heavy old slug the piston is.....He thought possibly from a stationary engine?

Thanks for the kind words Steve, and I own one of those WD/L's. From contract C8620 and supplied to Hilsea Barracks in 1942. Ron

 

collection 058.jpg

Edited by Ron

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Some more parts arrived from Hitchcock's today. I'm happy to report that the piston is genuine Hepolite. Ron

Ben 067.jpg

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Ah yes Ron, I now recall......that's one nice restoration there.......you seem to be the "King" of rare Enfield's...........don't you also have a model "G" ? Thanks also for the info Jan..........

It's always puzzled me a tad as to why Enfield's were non too prolific throughout the military during WW2, in comparison to similar products of other manufacturers.............if we discount the model C's serving with the French and the BEF up to 1940, and the WD/RE between 1943 and 1945, all models appear from various sources, especially photographic, seen from later 1940 through to the end of the war appear to have served primarily on the home front.........even the (then new in 1942) WD/CO was released in some quantity from WD stocks from 1943 onward for issue to NFS, etc...............certainly, photographic evidence proves the fact that some WD/CO's were issued and used by the military late-war although again, little if any evidence exists to show service overseas unlike other makes............

Rumours abound of the Enfield's being "too heavy", but that's nonsense as they compare favourably alongside other bikes.........personally, I suspect (I don't actually know) that the various 4-stroke Enfield's were not favoured for "front line" use simply because the engine design with the oil stored in a vulnerable compartment in the crankcase was a disaster waiting to happen, any impact on a rock liable to fracture the aluminium casing rendering the bike completely u/s..........

This is rather odd, when it is considered that Enfield were very focused on updating and improving their products throughout the war, including forks, frames and various other details..............yet for whatever reason, no crankcase protective bash-plate was ever introduced for the WD/C and WD/CO...............makes you wonder.............

Edited by wdbikemad

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Yes Steve I'm missing a WD/J and KX (Fat chance on either!!) 

It is odd that despite all the various WD models RE produced (far more than most) that they never really took on the role as a front line machine. As you say they made continual improvements and upgrades. They also don't seem as desirable with modern day DR's as the other makes, and I've even heard comments about the engine with combined oil tank being ugly. 

Obviously I do like them and especially my WD/G which although has basically the same engine as a CO with a beefed up crank, It just feels so much more comfortable......Probably all the rubber parts ironing out the vibrations and the big front brake helps. Apart from obvious differences, it shares its parts list with the WD/L.

One thing I think I'm right in saying, RE were the only wartime manufacturer who adopted the more sensible slack wire ignition advance. Ron   

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Agreed Ron, I also have a soft spot for Enfield's..............I'm a fan of the WD/RE, but also like the bigger machines.........as stated earlier, I once used a WD/C as daily transport for work and back (about 10 miles a day) for a couple of years back in the late 1980's..........I liked it, being very reliable, easy to get parts for and simple to maintain........it was also pretty good up to 50mph on the back roads................sadly, I managed to blow the thing up by seriously flogging it on occasion, and one day the conrod snapped at speed taking out the piston and a few other things as well ! But a subsequent rebuild, along with a rebore, sorted the beast out and she was back to her reliable self..........

I'm sure with your track record that a J or KX may well come along in due course.....!

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15 hours ago, wdbikemad said:

Ah yes Ron, I now recall......that's one nice restoration there.......you seem to be the "King" of rare Enfield's...........don't you also have a model "G" ? Thanks also for the info Jan..........

It's always puzzled me a tad as to why Enfield's were non too prolific throughout the military during WW2, in comparison to similar products of other manufacturers.............if we discount the model C's serving with the French and the BEF up to 1940, and the WD/RE between 1943 and 1945, all models appear from various sources, especially photographic, seen from later 1940 through to the end of the war appear to have served primarily on the home front.........even the (then new in 1942) WD/CO was released in some quantity from WD stocks from 1943 onward for issue to NFS, etc...............certainly, photographic evidence proves the fact that some WD/CO's were issued and used by the military late-war although again, little if any evidence exists to show service overseas unlike other makes............

Rumours abound of the Enfield's being "too heavy", but that's nonsense as they compare favourably alongside other bikes.........personally, I suspect (I don't actually know) that the various 4-stroke Enfield's were not favoured for "front line" use simply because the engine design with the oil stored in a vulnerable compartment in the crankcase was a disaster waiting to happen, any impact on a rock liable to fracture the aluminium casing rendering the bike completely u/s..........

This is rather odd, when it is considered that Enfield were very focused on updating and improving their products throughout the war, including forks, frames and various other details..............yet for whatever reason, no crankcase protective bash-plate was ever introduced for the WD/C and WD/CO...............makes you wonder.............

You're absolutely right Steve. There is lots of evidence that the WD/RE has been used in Arnhem (but do we have evidence of its use in other theaters of war...?), but when I look at all the war-time photographs of WD/CO motorcycles, I also come to the conclusion that they have "not" been used during the liberation of Europe. Lots of Home Guard pictures with WD/COs, NFS and AFS used them, as well as the Civil Defense. And training... But I still have to find a photograph of a WD/CO "at the front".

Different story with the WD/C, which was used (in small quantities) by the BEF and by the French Army in 1940. The WD/C was also used by the Australian Army, who had ordered a contract of 1000 bikes. And 180 British contract WD/Cs have also been transferred to the Australian Army. Lots of these motorcycles have been used in the Middle East, there are many war time photographs to prove this. Most of the British contract WD/Cs also seem to have been used for training purposes and for Home Guard duties.

I'm sure with your track record that a J or KX may well come along in due course.....!

Enfield despatched four WD/KX bikes to Thorp Arch, York. Contract C11467, but no known census numbers. Thorp Arch was a Royal Ordnance Factory (or ROF). Were the WD/KXs used to transport heavy bombs on the sidecar chassis…?

Six WD/J2 motorcycles were despatched to the RAF, according to O&M they were sent to “MAP Pool, Horseferry Road, London” (where did you find this information Steve?) A Google search didn’t reveal anything RAF related... Does anybody have more information on “MAP Pool, Horseferry Road, London”?

Jan

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