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METEOR ENGINE, TOOL VALVE HOLDING

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Dear All,

I need to change the inlet valve oil seals (Pt No 3 RR EM5114) on the REME Museum's Conqueror ARV.  The EMER Power S544/1 Pt 1 lists the valve holding tool LV3/ RR Z2997.  Unfortunately I do not have one!  There is a photo of it in use (it fits into spark plug hole) but no indication as to how it works.  I can easily make one if I could see how it works and I would rather not have to re-invent the wheel!  Does anyone have one of these tools or knows anyone who has one.  Even a photo of the business end would be useful.  Ideal would be a sketch with dimensions.

If I can change the oil seals I am hoping that the plugs will not come out wet with oil.

 

John

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Hi John

I wonder if it is similar to the one used with Rolls B Range engines, are you familiar with that one? Used to change inlet stem seals without lifting the head.

regards, Richard

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Hi John,

This is a picture of the Rolls tool for holding inlet valves on B Range engines. The top gland nut is released and tool inserted in plug hole, the curved end is pulled up against the valve and the gland nut tighten to lock in place.

 

RR tool.JPG

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Hello John,

 I've heard of compressed air being used to do this. Never done it myself but the gentlemen who had used this technique was replacing valve springs on a rover V8. Spark plug modified to take an air line.

Hope this helps.

Dave.

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An old trick which I have used very successfully is to remove the spark plug and thread a foot or so of soft rope through the hole. Then turn the engine gently so that the piston pushes the rope against the valve and stops it dropping. When you have done, turn the engine the other way and pull the rope out. This works brilliantly on lesser engines but would get a bit tedious on a Meteor ! Obviously it doesn't work on the exhaust valves of early landrovers or B series engines or any side valve engines. I have also used it to lock the crank on lawnmower and chainsaw engines when undoing the flywheel nut but you need to use enough rope that it goes solid at roughly mid stroke to get the best leverage.

David

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I tried to get hold of the drawings for the B60 tool to use on my Ferret to replace worn stem seals, but to nremove avail

i ended up spending some considerable time at the REME museum I think with very helpful staff, and all we came up with was the picture shown earlier in this post.

if anyone has correct manufacturing drawings, or access to an existing tool to borrow in order to reverse engineer them, that would be great 

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I imagine that if someone had the time and a spare head to play with, it should be easy to figure out.

trevor

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Dear All,

 

This is such a fabulous forum no matter what level of experience or expertise one is at..  This thread is but one example and I am so grateful for the help.

I was aware of the Indian Rope Trick.  However, with a V12 it would be quite slow.

I had not thought of the compressed air trick and I already have a suitable adaptor for another purpose.  I however, I cannot take any risk of the valve dropping into the combustion chamber / cylinder bore.  There would be almost no chance of getting it back in the guide without lifting the block off the crank case, pistons etc.

What I will do is to make a copy of the tool shown in Lauren Child's photo. As the engine has twin spark plugs I can insert a camera through the other spark plug hole and ensure that the tool is in the right position to reliably hold the valve in position.. 

Many thanks for the help.

 

John

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Dear All,

 

I have now got the engine out and at my workshop. I am now considering the using the compressed air trick to change the inlet valve oil seals (now in stock).  The worry about the comp air trick is dropping the valve down the cylinder.  With the engine out it is easy to see how I could lock the engine at TDC for the cylinder in question.  In that position, I don't think that the valve could actually fall right out of the valve guide.  I could also engineer a high reliability air supply.

Does anyone know for sure if the valve would not be able to fall out if the piston was at TDC?

John

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hi john

 

you could speak to peter grieve at flight engineering in leeds. he rebuilds meteors and merlins and will have figured out most tricks  involved in the process tel. 0113 2430792

 

regards

 

rick

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