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Hi. Many thanks Andy I appreciate any info for this type of lorry as it's a bit rare, I have sent the seller a note about it.

 

With regards to the boats I have contacted the D - Day Museum Development Officer. Portsmouth about plans for the boats, they don't have any BUT they did have one of the boats but gave it to the Royal Engineers Museum and they have it on display. So I shall have to contact R.E Museum to see if they might have plans for the boats or see if they will let take photos and measurements of it. As for my boat building skills I did build HMS Victory - supplied by Airfix.

 

Cheers.

P.B

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Give me a ring Paul 07956355198 . We can have a look over our Albion . Ft11

Can't seam to E-mail you .. Andy

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Hi. Just to say many thanks to Andy for letting me climb all over his Albion FT 11 and for taking me for a ride around the family farm. Also just to let you know that the bolt does fit the sump plug and the plug is just a bit loose ready to drop the engine oil out - hopefully in the oil bucket and not all over me as the space from ground level to the sump is a little bit tight!.

Next to the other Andy who told me about the Folding Boat Equipment Handbook on E Bay - I did contact the seller about the book and is now sat on my desk, many thanks for letting me know about it.

 

Right to finish off the last posting, I did put a photo up of the rear wheel that almost had the wheel pulled off but forgot to show the finished job.attachment.php?attachmentid=128543&stc=1

 

What I have been working on parts of the lorry and one of the main parts was to put back the correct walk ways on the chassis. I used a hard wood that comes from South Africa but when working with it, it can splinter and even break.

The past owner had just used plywood to make up the walk ways and was pretty ropey and had a slight covering of moss all over it. The tie downs had also suffered due to being wet wood and I did manage to save the main tie downs with the hook and chains fixed to tie down. The only ones that could not be saved were the triangle tie downs and I had brand new ones made up.attachment.php?attachmentid=128544&stc=1

I felt that I had to do the lorry justice and put back the walk ways as per new build.attachment.php?attachmentid=128545&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128546&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128547&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128548&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128549&stc=1

 

The cab when I got to it was full of moss again - I don't know what it is with Albion's and moss ?. The passengers seat had turned into balsa wood and having took measurements to rebuild it - broke it up and removed it from the cab. The rear back rest had also had it's day and removed it. The drivers seat was also in the same condition and again I took the measurements before removing it.attachment.php?attachmentid=128550&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128551&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128552&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128553&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128554&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128555&stc=1

The brown roll is the new back rest for the passenger seat.

 

I'm looking for a exhaust manifold as mime has a crack in it, the manifold still has the army quick fix - a exhaust bandage on it from the 1950's.

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Also I'm in need of the oil cup that fits the Clayton Dewandre main servo as the lid has broken off and possible water damage on the inside of the servo. Until I take it apart and check to see what else is required to get it working again

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I did contact the D-Day Museum at Portsmouth about any plans for the Folding Boats, the reply was that they didn't have any plans but did have a Folding Boat - but gave it away to the Royal Engineers Museum at Gillingham, Kent. I have contacted Rebecca Blackburn at the Museum and they are more than happy to let me take photo's and also take measurements of the boat as well. I just have to arrange a date for the visit with them, this will be late September as Network Rail have closed my local station due to overhead wires being installed, new platforms and other works. By the time I get to the Museum it will be time to turn around and head back to Bristol.

 

PB

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Good work Paul, all the more noteworthy as you are having to work outside by the look of it, keep the photos and up dates coming please

 

Pete

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Hi Pete. Yes this is the problem I'm having to restore it outside and just cover it back up again when the rain starts. When I got hold of the Albion the main thing I wanted to do as many other vehicle owners have done and that was to strip down to the bear bones. Full restoration , new wiring and full repaint etc, etc but having waited and having a look around to see if a workshop could be found at a friendly rates, nothing came forward and I just 'Bit the bullet' and brought it back home.

 

This changed the standard of restoration I could carry out, so it's what I can do at the time. I'm lucky that the lorry has had a full paint job on it and in some areas this is protecting areas that I cannot get to.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=128570&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128571&stc=1 Not quite military vehicles but to show the sort of restoration I do with a workshop. The black bike I brought from the USA and after £4.500 spent on it buying new parts - the final show.

 

I just work on areas that I can remove and take into the garage and put back, but I do want to work on the front end but until I have more wheels back on the lorry I won't touch it as it is still on axle stands at the rear. Plus if the 'Hand of Fate' decides to pay a visit when a 3 ton lorry is on all axle stands, I have no plans to be found half way under the front end with a 3 ton lorry sat on my chest! Over cautious well yes.

 

P.B

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You are right to be cautious when working underneath, especialy working on your own. I knew 2 men who went to work under vehicles, one with axle stands under vehicle. They both did not go home again. I have stands and big chocks of wood and am still wary.

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Hi. I take a look at the job before starting and when ready, work to the 'Belt and Braces' system. When I jack up a axle I place a axle stand underneath and then pack with wood along side it to be doubly sure. I had a saying when working on the footplate of the railways - 'Familiarity Breeds Contempt'.

 

Right a few more photos and this time shows the Drivers side walk way again all brand new wood. There is a slight change to the original set up, due to the body work being out of line the side wall should be in one length but would have had a bow in the middle of it. So I made the choice to cut it into two like the other side.attachment.php?attachmentid=128590&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128591&stc=1 The metal strips are brand new and ready to take the adjustable tie downs that have the straps joined to the chains that fit on to the tie downs.attachment.php?attachmentid=128592&stc=1 The clamps that hold the tie down straps are in a poor condition and will have to be replaced and the hook at the end of the strap is missing and have no idea how they should look. All that I can do is make up some thing or look for a modern items.

The rear brake drums are are being tackled one by one, check, clean and paint. There should be 5 - 7/16th BSF set screws holding the drum onto the hub but they are missing so will have to buy 15 plus 5 spares to replace the missing ones.attachment.php?attachmentid=128593&stc=1

The brake shoes are in a good condition as they were all changed during it's last restoration.As each brake drum is restored then the wheel will go on and then move on to the next one.

 

A photo to show the triangle tie downs one spare new one and two old ones that have suffered being in the wet plywood.attachment.php?attachmentid=128594&stc=1

 

P.B

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Hi. As the two rear wheels are now ready for having the two new tyres fitted, I thought I would move on to the rear axle and brake drumsattachment.php?attachmentid=128787&stc=1

 

The drum is held on to the axle hub by 4 -7/16th BSF set screws and not 5 as I posted before. After much pushing and pulling the drum came off and only to find 'The Wonderful World of Spiders' and sat in the middle of a spiders nest was a big, black, mean and a thug of a spider. Please don't get me wrong not scared of spiders but I did have one bite me - not very pleasant.attachment.php?attachmentid=128788&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128789&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128790&stc=1

 

The drum wants a good clean up and repaint, the brake shoes are okay as they have been relined . Next is to remove the half shaft as this does nothing now because there isn't any worm wheel in the axle. When I removed the one from the Dvr's side it was a bit rusty and I expect the same state on this one but it will be replaced as it is a dust cover for the main bearing.

 

The hub will also be removed and the bearings checked - cleaned out of the old grease and packed with fresh grease, but before that there are two metal strips that fit on the back of the hub and these have the brake drum dust covers are fitted to them. They will need to have the old bolts removed from them and just run a tap down the threads to clean them up.

 

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The original dust covers and are in bit of a state, there is two that can be reused again and the remaining ones could either be repaired or get new ones made up. Having thoughts about trying to make up new ones but it's just getting the radius and the fold over correct.

 

Next on the list to be made is a set of leather gaiters that fit either side of the spring anchorage spherical bush housing and the leather gaiters are held on by two plates that are bolted top and bottom to bush housing.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=128792&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128793&stc=1

The photos show one original is still in place but in a worn out condition. I shall measure up the diameter of the rings and get them laser cut and find a supply of leather sheet to make up the gaiters.

 

Last job will be to replace some of the nuts on the top of the spring plate as they have seen better days.

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PB

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It's these sort of jobs that take the time with these early British trucks as everything is bespoke to the make and indeed the model, well done Paul keep at it.

 

Just word to the wise, when you work on the spring packs do make sure you take all the weight off the springs you are working on, there is a lot of stored energy in those big boys when under compression :wow:

 

regards

 

Pete

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Hi Pete. Many thanks for your advice and comments, with regards to the nuts on the spring plate it's a job that 'Do I leave it alone' and will it stop the lorry being passed fit for the road; or 'Do I change them' now and have no problems.

 

The two complete dust covers are now fully restored and put into store - the brake drum has been cleaned also and ready for painting. next will to remove the half shaft, brake shoes and hub.

 

Hope all is going well with your lorry.

 

Cheers

P.B

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Hi. The brake drum has been cleaned up and repainted. During the cleaning up there seemed to be a lot of muck on the inside of the drum and the more I dug it out the more I found damage to the brake face on the drum. When the lorry was in the scrap yard water got in between the brake shoe and the face and has pitted the drum.

I have measured the depth of the pitting and ranges from 1/8th up to a 1/4 of an inch on the face. Having taken some advice about it, the out come was to clean the face and remove any high spots as the lorry has been running with this problem before me.

 

I did consider having the drum face machined up but with the amount of metal to be removed it would scrap the casting and these drums are not on the counter at any motor factor. I have cleaned up the face and being careful not to make it oval, when it needs the next heavy overhaul I shall take a drum up to a foundry and get a pattern made and get 4 raw castings made.

 

When checking the measurements on the pitting I found that two of the mounting holes were very thin at the edge of the hole to the edge of the drum. I can only think that the drum was set up wrong for machining and to correct this, the machine operator has put in a much larger hole to hide his mistake.

 

The half shaft has been removed and is in a worst condition than the other side, it was a right game to get it pulled out.attachment.php?attachmentid=128880&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128881&stc=1

There seems to be water damage inside the hub and will have to check for this when I get around to removing it, I need to find a very thin wire brush with a very long handle to clean up the inside. Before I do take the hub off, I shall take some measurements at the locking collar so it goes back to the same setting.

 

Two of the rear dust covers have also been cleaned up and painted ready for fitting back on the drum. The two metal strips that the covers bolt to are in a good condition and will only need a wire brushing and the threads cleaning up.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=128885&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128886&stc=1

The brake shoes will come off but only when the parts taken off so far are restored and put away in boxes until ready to be fitted back again.

The rear wheels are painted and need to be taken to the tyre company for tyre fitting.

 

P.B

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Hi. After the hassle of trying to remove the half shaft from the hub, I spent time this afternoon cleaning it up.

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This photo shows the state it was in, all covered in a film of rust as it seems water has got in to the rear axle. The splines were just one lump of rust and took several tries with the wire brush to clean them up.

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The rest of the shaft had some minor rust spots and were given a slight tap with a hammer. The end cap was full of dried up grease and thoughts are going as to the state of the roller bearings, I know from feel that when turning the hub the rear bearing sounds a bit not happy. It could just be the case of a good clean and fresh grease being worked through it.

attachment.php?attachmentid=128907&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128908&stc=1

As the axle is missing the rear diff, the axle body is empty of oil and has been running like this for some time, the half shafts are just bone dry and so are the oil seals that fit at the rear of the hubs. The plan is to fill the axle body with oil and kept the half shafts covered in oil to protect them as at some stage the rear diff will be found and fitted.

attachment.php?attachmentid=128909&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128910&stc=1

To help with the preservation of the half shafts, I have given them a coating of Red Oxide paint.

 

Another part missing from the axle body is the drain plug and according to the spare parts manual it's a Tecalemit 4657 plug. I have checked their web site and they make plugs for sumps on BMW motor bikes . Any body out there who might know of it's sizes or have a spare one. If not it could be a bolt put in.

 

Next job is to remove the brake shoes and the hub .

 

P.B

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Hi. Managed to strip down the hub today and I have broken it all down into it's separate parts for cleaning and exam. The locking collar was measured from the edge of the hub to the collar so that it would go back to the same settings and not over tighten the bearings.

attachment.php?attachmentid=128961&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128962&stc=1

The rear bearing that I had some concerns over, was okay but will need a good clean and fresh grease working through it. On checking the wheel studs some of the threads have some slight damage to them but a run down with a L/H die nut has cleaned them up and will be okay. These will be added to the replacement list but to remove them will be a job of drilling the stud away from the nut as if any heavy pressure from a press or hammer will break off the lugs. As per the brake drums a pattern to be made and a couple of raw castings made up and put into stores. The 7/16th BSF threads have had a tap run down them to clean up the threads, these hold the brake drum on to the hub.

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=128963&stc=1

 

The front bearing has been cleaned up and checked over and is still in a good condition. In the photo you can see the felt oil seal and this was found okay but needed a good clean and left to soak in oil. You can see the remains of the two half round leather gaiters holding plates, not much use now apart from being a pattern. I shall see about getting these cut out or have a go myself as they are only made out of 20 gauge steel with a extra piece inside to hold the edge of the leather. The 3 long bolts are just threaded bar with a BSF thread on each end and a castellated nut and a split pin put through. There are a max of 6 of these bolts which pass through one set of plates through the spring anchor brackets and into the other plate.attachment.php?attachmentid=128964&stc=1

 

The leather gaiter came off in one piece but is only fit for a pattern and will have 4 made up, I still need to have 4 of the bearing gaiters made up as well but will have try and rescue one off the other axles.attachment.php?attachmentid=128965&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128966&stc=1

The photo shows both sides of the gaiter.

The brake shoes need a clean up and repaint and again these will have to be added to the replacement list as one is worn due to rusting over the years. But will try putting an ad in a commercial mag for any replacements.attachment.php?attachmentid=128967&stc=1

 

Cheers.

P.B

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Noticeably different construction with regard to similar component parts to my Leyland Retriever, it demonstrates in a very practical sense the logistical problems of Field Workshops having to cater for a large range of diverse makes.

 

I'm currently doing some work with my late Fathers unit war diaries covering the day to day activities of a REME Infantry Field Workshop in N Africa, Sicily, Italy and Austria and the problem with spares for the large array of makes and sub types of British built vehicles comes through very clearly particularly after the second front was opened when it became common practice to strip vehicles that could not for any reason be repaired by a 2nd echelon unit like his and load the spares on board and take them with them when moved forward. This practice was still officially frowned upon but was the only way the British inventory could be maintained in running condition.

 

Keep the photos coming Paul very much enjoying seeing your progress.

Pete

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Hi Pete. My view on spares is down to bit of Engineering background and steam loco restoration where we had to get parts made so that it would run again. I want to keep the 'Ole Girl' running as long as I can and won't except it, if a part is broken or worn out that it should be stuffed and mounted in a Museum.

 

Very interesting to read about reclaiming spares off battle damaged vehicles, this view was carried on the railways as loco's - steam or diesel to be scrapped had useful parts removed and sent back to the stores to work another day.

 

Regards.

Paul Burns.

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Hi. Back from my weeks holiday and time for a catch up. After stripping down the rear hub, I started to clean up the lubrication nipples and in the course of the cleaning of the first brass one; I found engraved on the body was 'OIL'. Thinking no more about it carried on with the other two brass nipples and found the same again. A quick check on the lubrication chart in the manual and found that 95 % of the lubrication nipples are for oil and found that these oil nipples were full of grease.

The brake fulcrum pins were also full of grease and there wasn't any lubrication getting to the P/Bronze bearings in the brake shoes. So clean out and push some oil into the pins. Also on the chart was the oil reservoir for the trunnion bearing bushesattachment.php?attachmentid=129462&stc=1 If you look at the cover with 6 bolts between the two axles, you can see the top with a oil nipple on it and this is the filling point for the oil reservoir. So I thought I would check the oil level and took the top off, put my finger in to it - time for a dramatic pause - silent scream - moment over, it was full of grease and so was the other side. Had to remove the covers and clean out all the grease that had been pumped in and refill with fresh oil.

On checking various other oil nipples these have been pumped with grease and having copied the lubrication chart, will have to work my way around them and mark off on the chart that they have been cleaned out and fresh oil pumped in.

attachment.php?attachmentid=129463&stc=1 Before

attachment.php?attachmentid=129464&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=129465&stc=1And after.

attachment.php?attachmentid=129466&stc=1 Before

attachment.php?attachmentid=129467&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=129468&stc=1 And after.

With the removal of the grease you can see that what was dry is now wet with fresh oil, 1 hub down 5 more to do.

 

Cheers.

P.B

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Hi. When putting the hub back together the first parts to be fitted were the dust shields. out of 6 only 3 were okay. They had been stored in the old side locker and suffered badly from being in a small pond, but I had got 2 tops and 1 bottom piece. The bottom half had been repaired but was a bit of a rough job and needed a good clean up on the welds, plus a hole had to be drilled to get it to fit correctly. The holes in the stays were cleaned up with a 5/16th BSF taps and ordered some 5/16th BSF bolts and to give the old girl a treat, ordered some 3/8th BSF castle nuts in stainless steel for the pins.attachment.php?attachmentid=129476&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=129477&stc=1

These pins fit into the spring anchorage spherical bush housing and have two plates either side, top and bottom this fixes the leather gaiters to the bush housing. There were only 3 left in the housing and they were just pushed into it, I have now got the BMS 3/8th rod and this has now been cut into 3 pieces and is the next job to be done. It is just a case of threading both ends and measuring for the holes for the split pins .The outer bearing that fits in the hub was

sized but with some WD40 the bearing races were freed and cleaned up, plenty of grease worked into it and is free to move. The leather gaiter that was left on, I did manage to repair it, but sewing is not my best skill and having stuck the needle into my finger a few times, was beginning to think that this was a bad idea. But it has been repaired/ cleaned and I have worked leather restore paste back in to it and is now soft and supple, ready to be fitted. There is still another gaiter to be made that fits on the inside between the spring and the housing.

The inside of the axle was cleaned out of rust but still looking for a drain plug for it, before I can fill it up with oil.

 

P.B

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This thread jumped off the screen this morning.

 

The SS Thistlegorm has three of these vehicles in the holds - see http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/showthread.php?43658-Thistlegorm-vehicles-mistaken-identities for the background to the story.

 

From the list of vehicles stored in the holds, we were missing a contemporary BY5 FBE example. None appeared to have survived.

 

Until now.

 

PB1954RS I have dropped you a PM.

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Hi. Time for a quick up date on the Albion.  I have been working my way around the oil points and cleaning out the grease used instead of oil on various parts and then marking them off on the chart to show that they have been done.

The two half's of the brackets that hold the leather gaiters on to protect the spherical bushes on the rear axles. I did consider getting these made up by a fabrication company but decided to have a go my self002.thumb.JPG.de677be95b16fcb660ea714f52c13c65.JPG

This was the first one made up and on a trial fit before finishing off.001.thumb.JPG.4b791e162e29b046481a5fdd8fb34284.JPG

This shows the rusted one on the left and a new one just needing another coat of paint. I did cut out of 20 gauge plate - cut the 4 backing plates and I made up a former to bend the edge over for the gaiter to sit on. When I did the bending, I did use some heat to make the forming easier.

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There should be 6 bolts to hold the brackets on but I only had 3 fitted, so sent off for 3/8" BMS bar and made up the missing bolts.004.thumb.JPG.74d0eeb1be998a08a5a0307059887f5c.JPG

As I have run out of gauge plate and will order some more when I get back from a holiday and carry on making up the two remaining brackets. So a job I have wanted to do for some time now is to change the engine oil, but every time I thought I would change it, went off and did some thing else.

So the day came when I would change it, bolt fitted into the sump plug but the plug wouldn't move, Albion fitted the sump with two sump plugs, don't know if any other makers did the same. Second one was loose and a quick check around me to see if I could make a fast getaway to save me from getting covered in oil as I was lying on my back.

Waste rags, large bucket to catch the oil and slowly turned the plug and getting closer to when the plug would come out, plug out and a Brown , Grey and Black Tar fell out of the sump. Left alone to drain out for a while, I put a finger in the sump to have a feel around and found a black sludge inside, this meant that the sump had to be dropped down and cleaned out.

Glad to say filter and sump cleaned and with a new gasket fitted put back on the engine.

Next job is to drain out the main gear box and hope I don;t find the same tar in there.

P.B

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Hi. Time for a update on the old girl.  Things have been a bit slow due to the weather as I keep the lorry outside under sheets and as the season has changed, I have set up a programme of mechanical jobs to  pass the winter away.

First of all I have now got the vehicle Army Reg  from the R.L.C Archive and it's  18YX66 and was sold off on the 25/08/59 and is marked as C.V.D Ashchurch.

Next tyres, 002.thumb.JPG.9eb386e2d3285415c86b52410aa5c3ef.JPG

These are the new tyres but only one fitted but you can see that they have a larger diameter but still the same size. The old tyre is going to be fitted on the spare tyre stand on the other side of the body work, still need two more tyres to finish.

Also the brackets for the leather gaiters are now fitted and checking the others will need to make a full set for the remaining axles.003.thumb.JPG.5056e82d442d730b3ecdd69e6283b1f8.JPG

And talking about axles still looking for the rear axle drain plug - 1-1/8" BSF thread, any one got a spare one doing nothing and want to find a good home - them please let me know. If I cannot get one then I shall have to have one made up.

I brought some leather off Ebay and also the hole punch and eyelet  punch as well. I wanted to touch up the paint work on the wheel - please don't try this at home - 004.thumb.JPG.10b1b307a638a52c9a586a6159f75f84.JPG

And 3/4's of a can of green paint is now sat on my garden. I was lying on my back to check and fit the original leather gaiter and I found some thing stuck in my back, quick push with the arm problem gone. Then came the smell of paint - another can on order.

One of the winter jobs is to try and get the engine running, there is a new battery as the old one was passed it's working life date. When connected the stater motor will spin but from the fuse box/ control board to the instrument panel is dead. I have checked the fuses and cleaned them up but still the same . There isn't any of the lights working or any discharge on the ammeter - it's like a blockage on the cable that's stopping it from working.

Well fellow restorers  any ideas as to what the problem could be any views welcome.

P.B

 

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Just found this thread fascinating - regarding old wiring - I have just finished the installation of a new old stock wiring loom in a friends QL  - one item I found useful was a cheap multimeter for checking the continuity in individual wires fuses ect - 

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Hi. It's on my list to get a multimeter and will be checking out various web sites to get one. As for the problem well it's from the control board upwards, I have taken the cover off to check the wiring but all seems okay. Could something electrical in the control board be stuck, burnt out or just being very awkward.. I want to try and get this out before buying a new control board, it could something so simple.........

PB.

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Any chance you could scan and post a wiring diagram for your lorry as often this type of fault/break may be down to bad contact - earth/grounding 

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Hi. As requested the wiring diagram for the Albion in two parts. The lorry has stood outside for many a good few years, so I don't know if the weather has corroded any of the wiring or terminals.011.thumb.JPG.e281c12fe0fff9318ec7c64b07021069.JPG012.thumb.JPG.bf0ebc1a3b3e99aa1fac40c2d40c5a48.JPG Any thoughts or suggestions welcome.

Cheers.

P.B

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