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I've enjoyed reading his thread, my interest in the hobby started with airfix & Tamiya model kits and then at age 15 I visited The Tank Museum...

 

On the subject of attracting young blood to the hobby, I was 30 when I purchased my first MV (my Militant) and that was four years after buying my first property. I've not had help from family in purchasing either. I was one of thousands of students in the early 2000s who went to university but should have probably gone into an apprenticeship or job. What little careers advice there was given was focused on which university to go to - driven by the government of the day.

 

Whilst at uni and for a while after I got a driving job with a large car rental firm which I loved as I enjoy driving. After uni and with £16,000 student debt I couldn't get a graduate job anywhere - too many graduates to compete with, I made just over a hundred applications. There's that supply & demand element again.

 

I'm glad it happened that way now as it meant I concentrated on the rental industry and moved from driving to a junior office job as a fleet administrator for a large HGV rental company. Over time I worked my way up to be Maintenance Manager in charge of six HGV mechanics & four workshop office staff. All this fitted perfectly with my interest in MVs and the knowledge and local contacts made at work has been invaluable in maintaining & storing my Militant.

 

My employers paid for my Class 2, I paid for my Class 1, I also managed to wangle a rough terrain telescopic handler & a lorry mounted crane course out of them.

 

Regarding the recruitment of trained mechanics/technical staff, we struggled for months to recruit HGV mechanics as the local hourly rate surpassed £13.50 an hour - we also have the likes of Rolls-Royce, Bombardier & JCB locally actively poaching HGV mechanics for £18 an hour. In the end we partnered up with the Ford Skillsnet apprentice scheme and we're lucky to have found a committed young lad who after six years in the job is now a good HGV mechanic - we had two applicants for this position when advertised. The last two mechanics I employed were the only two who applied for the job at ages 62 & 52 respectively.

 

Without all of the above I'd probably have purchased a Land Rover sized vehicle to join, learn & show at MV events. As regards the price bubble, my vehicle is niche so the prices seem stable over the last six years.

 

Interestingly, around the time I purchased the Militant I deleted my Facebook account and haven't been back since - these types of site hold much more interest.

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It all depends on what era you are interested in I suppose.. I've always collected Soviet/Russian military gear and never had an interest in WW2. So when it was time to buy a vehicle I got a BRDM-2, which is an armoured vehicle for half or even a third of what a "common" Willys jeep is going for..

 

So in my mind I have the rarer vehicle :cool2:, which is an armoured one to boot! With recent or current surplus vehicles like that it's still doable to buy them.. If you want to go WW2 it gets quite a bit harder..

 

 

TL;DR: A Jeep isn't the only military vehicle around.. Prices for those have gone crazy.. Looking into other era's (Cold war for example) is always a good choice :)

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I've enjoyed reading his thread, my interest in the hobby started with airfix & Tamiya model kits and then at age 15 I visited The Tank Museum...

 

On the subject of attracting young blood to the hobby, I was 30 when I purchased my first MV (my Militant) and that was four years after buying my first property. I've not had help from family in purchasing either. I was one of thousands of students in the early 2000s who went to university but should have probably gone into an apprenticeship or job. What little careers advice there was given was focused on which university to go to - driven by the government of the day.

 

Whilst at uni and for a while after I got a driving job with a large car rental firm which I loved as I enjoy driving. After uni and with £16,000 student debt I couldn't get a graduate job anywhere - too many graduates to compete with, I made just over a hundred applications. There's that supply & demand element again.

 

I'm glad it happened that way now as it meant I concentrated on the rental industry and moved from driving to a junior office job as a fleet administrator for a large HGV rental company. Over time I worked my way up to be Maintenance Manager in charge of six HGV mechanics & four workshop office staff. All this fitted perfectly with my interest in MVs and the knowledge and local contacts made at work has been invaluable in maintaining & storing my Militant.

 

My employers paid for my Class 2, I paid for my Class 1, I also managed to wangle a rough terrain telescopic handler & a lorry mounted crane course out of them.

 

Regarding the recruitment of trained mechanics/technical staff, we struggled for months to recruit HGV mechanics as the local hourly rate surpassed £13.50 an hour - we also have the likes of Rolls-Royce, Bombardier & JCB locally actively poaching HGV mechanics for £18 an hour. In the end we partnered up with the Ford Skillsnet apprentice scheme and we're lucky to have found a committed young lad who after six years in the job is now a good HGV mechanic - we had two applicants for this position when advertised. The last two mechanics I employed were the only two who applied for the job at ages 62 & 52 respectively.

 

Without all of the above I'd probably have purchased a Land Rover sized vehicle to join, learn & show at MV events. As regards the price bubble, my vehicle is niche so the prices seem stable over the last six years.

 

Interestingly, around the time I purchased the Militant I deleted my Facebook account and haven't been back since - these types of site hold much more interest.

 

---

 

Interesting to read , and QUOTE

 

I was one of thousands of students in the early 2000s who went to university but should have probably gone into an apprenticeship or job. What little careers advice there was given was focused on which university to go to - driven by the government of the day.

 

----

 

Government political will , yes you were directed - however you are probably unaware of the real truth.

 

Certainly on a UK regional basis (I was in a excellent position to witness) and probably nationally . Engineering training was annihilated at Technical Colleges by 1980 (certainly two different college machine shops I used were stripped out and equipped with stud-walls to train YTS how to emulsion , gloss and Artex. First year apprentice off-the-job full time training then the responsibility of local industry EITB workshops. I was born 1950 so was of the first year intake who had to do the similar EITB alongside Gity & Guilds craft . Of course the there had been (since 1950's) facility (G1 & G2 exams) to take the just sub-standard grades (failure at the 2nd part of 11+ , so to Secondary Modern , not Grammar School) . G1 & G2 - allowed entry to ONC (part-time) and OND (full-time, IIRC two extra subjects) - without the normally required 'O' level certificates. For apprentices , one full day at college and 2 or 3 evenings (doing "endorsement" subjects . Some would stay fully "in their trade" - a apprenticeship being 6 full years, others at 18 yrs. would convert to full time student on HND courses , often with a bolt-on as a "Junior Draughtsman" because you actually had to work during the holidays (other than the normal 2 weeks + Bank Hols.) . In the case of self - meaning another C&G T5 (Press Tool Design & Utilization) - that granted another "Full Technological Certificate". The system worked quite well - because you had the true 'technician status' within industry , when I had a problem on a 4-stage header tool for a National upset forger - I could at least talk to the Ch. Hand Die-sinker (that I had worked under for 6 months) on equal terms.

 

-----

 

Come Y2K , my elder son started at Lancaster Univ. (biology) , left 2003 . Passing on the M6 in 2004 there was a forrest of tower cranes on the site - I queried this with my son , yes they are intending taking in yet more 1000's of Chinese students p.a.

This then seems a new 'growth' indusry for the NW region. The even clever Chinese students (seriously clever cherry-picked from a nation of 800 + millions) spread more thinly around the "Russel Group" Univ. such as Durham and Newcastle where by then my younger son was doing chemistry.

 

So - yes , what you now have greatly in UK Engineering industry remaining , just sufficent craft trained to get by , the button pushers who may have been painters & decorators if that business had not been swamped out , + univ. trained management overseer (most of whom never enter the work field that they gained their degree in).

 

Final rant , actually a rant to me by a British Gas trained gas fitter / all appliance engineer with CORGI cert's and I presume G&G's. his training being 3 years - then self-employed , with refreshers by the appliance makers he covers . He is complaining that his job is now ruined, about the area being flooded with 'certificate waving' service van drivers - pushed through by this QUANGO on a 6 month course (part of a armed forces demob. resettlement plan).. STANDARDS compliance ?? questionable - his comment.

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Interesting topic ! I own a few military vehicles inc armour, my two lads aged 16 & 18 have no interest what so ever in military. Which of coarse is a great shame for me. I was recently offered a 1941 Willys MB Jeep in mint fully restored on the road condition, which my mate bought, only last week. So it just goes to show, not everything is mega money. In saying all that, I would say the average age of a military vehicle owner is 50-60 years old. So we desperately need new blood, how we achieve this I don't know. As most young people coming into the hobby, join re-enactment groups buy kit as it's a he'll of alot cheaper.

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At least they are joining something, a few will get the bug or finance and move to bigger things.

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Very interesting - a bit of topic but worth discussing

 

 

Certainly on a UK regional basis (I was in a excellent position to witness) and probably nationally . Engineering training was annihilated at Technical Colleges by 1980 (certainly two different college machine shops I used were stripped out and equipped with stud-walls to train YTS how to emulsion , gloss and Artex. First year apprentice off-the-job full time training then the responsibility of local industry EITB workshops. I was born 1950 so was of the first year intake who had to do the similar EITB alongside Gity & Guilds craft . Of course the there had been (since 1950's) facility (G1 & G2 exams) to take the just sub-standard grades (failure at the 2nd part of 11+ , so to Secondary Modern , not Grammar School) . G1 & G2 - allowed entry to ONC (part-time) and OND (full-time, IIRC two extra subjects) - without the normally required 'O' level certificates. For apprentices , one full day at college and 2 or 3 evenings (doing "endorsement" subjects . Some would stay fully "in their trade" - a apprenticeship being 6 full years, others at 18 yrs. would convert to full time student on HND courses , often with a bolt-on as a "Junior Draughtsman" because you actually had to work during the holidays (other than the normal 2 weeks + Bank Hols.) . In the case of self - meaning another C&G T5 (Press Tool Design & Utilization) - that granted another "Full Technological Certificate". The system worked quite well - because you had the true 'technician status' within industry , when I had a problem on a 4-stage header tool for a National upset forger - I could at least talk to the Ch. Hand Die-sinker (that I had worked under for 6 months) on equal terms.

 

I was born in '56 - all through school I wanted to join the RAF as an airframe fitter, I sadly failed to get the CSE grades needed for that but unknown to me my parents had applied for a Ford Motor Company apprenticeship as a toolmaker. To keep them quiet I went for the interview and when asked why I wanted to work for Ford replied "I didn't - I wanted to join the RAF". Thinking that was that I headed home with a clean conscience - only to get the offer of acceptance a week later.... So much for honesty! :)

 

For better or worse I took the offer - a 4 year apprentice ship as a machine toolmaker following the C&G 255 Technician syllabus. Two years in the companies own trade schools - now long gone followed by two years worth of rotational assignments in different tool rooms on the Dagenham estate - also now gone. Once qualified I worked in the Old Tool Room in Dagenham MS&BD whilst continuing at first Technical College then Polytechnic. The 4 years of the apprenticeship and then the 4 years that followed that were spent attending these colleges on block release - 4 weeks at work, 2 weeks at college to get up to HNC level in mechanical engineering. You name the heavy machinery - I can use it -both vertical and horizontal forms of mill and grinder, lathes, shapers, planers etc as well as heat treat, welding/brazing and bench work. The latter being quite useful at times these days.

 

My daughter was born in 1990 and when we was going through senior school what we used to call the three separate subjects of TD, woodworking and metal work have been rolled into one - Design Technology. Having taken one look at what they were being taught from the class text books I gave her my old apprentice log books and text books. A few weeks later we got called in to see her teacher as he could not understand why she was that much more advanced than her class mates. Apparently the cruncher was when they were assigned to lathes with him expecting them to stand and wait for explanations - only for him to turn around and see her happily - and safely - turning up the work piece with a well constructed working drawing to refer to. The apprentice explanation answered a lot of his questions.

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So which is the chicken and which is the egg? Are there no courses because there aren't any jobs, or no jobs because no-one is taking the courses?

 

Andy

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---

 

Interesting to read , and QUOTE

 

I was one of thousands of students in the early 2000s who went to university but should have probably gone into an apprenticeship or job. What little careers advice there was given was focused on which university to go to - driven by the government of the day.

 

----

 

Government political will , yes you were directed - however you are probably unaware of the real truth.

 

Certainly on a UK regional basis (I was in a excellent position to witness) and probably nationally . Engineering training was annihilated at Technical Colleges by 1980 (certainly two different college machine shops I used were stripped out and equipped with stud-walls to train YTS how to emulsion , gloss and Artex. First year apprentice off-the-job full time training then the responsibility of local industry EITB workshops. I was born 1950 so was of the first year intake who had to do the similar EITB alongside Gity & Guilds craft . Of course the there had been (since 1950's) facility (G1 & G2 exams) to take the just sub-standard grades (failure at the 2nd part of 11+ , so to Secondary Modern , not Grammar School) . G1 & G2 - allowed entry to ONC (part-time) and OND (full-time, IIRC two extra subjects) - without the normally required 'O' level certificates. For apprentices , one full day at college and 2 or 3 evenings (doing "endorsement" subjects . Some would stay fully "in their trade" - a apprenticeship being 6 full years, others at 18 yrs. would convert to full time student on HND courses , often with a bolt-on as a "Junior Draughtsman" because you actually had to work during the holidays (other than the normal 2 weeks + Bank Hols.) . In the case of self - meaning another C&G T5 (Press Tool Design & Utilization) - that granted another "Full Technological Certificate". The system worked quite well - because you had the true 'technician status' within industry , when I had a problem on a 4-stage header tool for a National upset forger - I could at least talk to the Ch. Hand Die-sinker (that I had worked under for 6 months) on equal terms.

 

-----

 

Come Y2K , my elder son started at Lancaster Univ. (biology) , left 2003 . Passing on the M6 in 2004 there was a forrest of tower cranes on the site - I queried this with my son , yes they are intending taking in yet more 1000's of Chinese students p.a.

This then seems a new 'growth' indusry for the NW region. The even clever Chinese students (seriously clever cherry-picked from a nation of 800 + millions) spread more thinly around the "Russel Group" Univ. such as Durham and Newcastle where by then my younger son was doing chemistry.

 

So - yes , what you now have greatly in UK Engineering industry remaining , just sufficent craft trained to get by , the button pushers who may have been painters & decorators if that business had not been swamped out , + univ. trained management overseer (most of whom never enter the work field that they gained their degree in).

 

Final rant , actually a rant to me by a British Gas trained gas fitter / all appliance engineer with CORGI cert's and I presume G&G's. his training being 3 years - then self-employed , with refreshers by the appliance makers he covers . He is complaining that his job is now ruined, about the area being flooded with 'certificate waving' service van drivers - pushed through by this QUANGO on a 6 month course (part of a armed forces demob. resettlement plan).. STANDARDS compliance ?? questionable - his comment.

 

I Left School and went to college in the late 80's and they where closing the workshops and converting to what I call " basic DIY skills teaching" we lost the rows of manual lathes, mils, grinders, shapers, forge, hobbers etc, also a couple of years later the cnc mill and lathe, Fanuc robot, hydraulic and pneumatic test rigs, and materials testing labs all went. and I know that all those courses where always over subscribed. it was a policy decision. at the time, Old Hag Maggy had just had her war against the unions and in the process helped kill off more of the heavy industry, and the building trade was seen as the way forward along with the uk being a "service sector economy" I can remember being told at school all those long years ago that in the future we would have more leisure time because everything would be automated and life would be easy. Oh how we laugh looking back! nostalgia ain't what it used to be!

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Posted (edited)

Read this thread with interest

 

Like a number of you in the early 1970's I went to a technical secondary modern school doing technical drawing woodwork, metal work, physics biology and chemistry all as separate subjects along with the standard syllabus subjects. I left and went into research and did another 8 years of study the first 4 as well as chemistry and physics leaning various skills required for experimental rig building including metal work, machine work welding brazing soldering vacuum plumbing and glass blowing of all things, the last 4 specializing in Chemistry, physical, organic and inorganic.

 

With the exception of the glass blowing everything else has been of use in 40 years of restoring and maintaining vintage vehicles........ and that is probably the answer to part of the question about the bubble bursting today's young people have not for nearly two generations had the broad based practical education that we had the privilege to have for free so apart from the money issue the skill in the hands is not there in the vast majority of young people, they also live in an immediate world so a restoration project of 3 or more years is not attractive to them.

 

Has the bubble burst ?..... I don't believe so, it may have plateaued as it has done before but the market price will out strip inflation despite what I have written above.

 

The fact is there are now people collecting//buying (they are not necessarily the an interchangeable term) who have the money to employ the few who do have the skills to restore and keep vintage machinery going.

 

It's not just an MV phenomenon, it's happening in all aspects of vintage vehicle collecting notably in the Hot Rod world it's gone from being 'Good Old Boy's' in a back street lock up to serious wads of cash being dispensed, a quick look at the sale prices or a walk around the trailer park at an event like Pendine Sands race day will confirm that MV's are still good value.

 

Pete

Edited by Pete Ashby

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Posted (edited)

WOW! - £33,750 FOR A JEEP !!!

- And it didn't really look as though it had any provenance - imagine what the purchaser may have paid if it had!!!

But is that price a true reflection of a jeeps worth or just someone with too much money / not enough common sense going mad at the auction I wonder?

it would be interesting to work out exactly how much a jeep would cost to build from scratch - as the advert for the auction stated that particular jeep was a complete restoration / re-build - so how much would it cost to visit the various jeep parts suppliers and do the same ? - would it really be £33,750...?

 

and imagine the collection of vehicles (MV) you could purchase as an alternative to the one jeep ?

 

So has the bubble burst...

It appears not....

 

Now - does anyone want to buy a 1943 Dodge WC52 for a bargain £30,000 ? (Well its cheaper than a jeep - you can save yourself £3750! )

 

WP_20150607_11_15_34_Pro.jpg

Edited by JEMIMA

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WOW! - £33,750 FOR A JEEP !!!

 

it would be interesting to work out exactly how much a jeep would cost to build from scratch - as the advert for the auction stated that particular jeep was a complete restoration / re-build - so how much would it cost to visit the various jeep parts suppliers and do the same ? - would it really be £33,750...?

 

No it would be the thick end of £9K plus purchase price assuming you stared with the power train, frame and body in repairable condition and you do all the work yourself apart from the block machining and do not cost for time:

 

Engine machining and full rebuild

Gearbox and transfer case complete rebuild

Axles overhauled all bearings replaced

Rad recored

All seals replaced

Rewire

New tires

New canvas

Paint

Odds and sods

 

Pete

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Intresting on people going over their histories. I left school at 15 no qualifications but a love of horses and agriculture. Got into Agricultural college, worked a lot harder than I did at school, because I wanted to. Working with lhorses and livestock, you had to learn to do things. You can't tell thirty odd horses, sorry no water , I'll have to get a plumber in but , he can't make it for a couple of days, Same with machinery, I need it now and can't afford to pay for some one else to do it. The one thing then was a scheme called YTS Youth Training scheme. They paid tuition and a few pound s a week , plus accmadation if you were away from home. You had to prove you had basic competence and dedication to whatever carrier you wanted to work in. Worked for me and I spent the next twenty years working with horses, gaining my qualifications as I went.

 

Heard an interesting thing on the radio today. A university Lecturer saying that Students must now be reffered to as customers, and they seem to think they are buying their way into a high paid job.

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Interesting thread; I have one question; Has all those imported Jeeps found in the USA etc and mostly in bad shape, increased the supply and lowered the price?

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Interesting thread; I have one question; Has all those imported Jeeps found in the USA etc and mostly in bad shape, increased the supply and lowered the price?

 

No I don't believe so,

 

In fact I think it's raised the price of project vehicles (a source that had all but dried up in the UK) by fulfilling a demand market.

As I noted in the previous post any one of those vehicles (I have one awaiting parts in the workshop now) will require £10 to £12K on top of purchase price not including time, so you can see that a jeep selling for around £18K is not actually busting a huge profit if any at all. The real money is with the owner who has kept the same vehicle for 20 or 30 years and now puts it on the market....... Not a novel concept it's same for most things in life including property.

Pete

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At least with Series and Defender Land Rovers the vehicles are worth more as parts than as running vehicles. The result seems to be that what would a couple or three years ago be looked on as a restoration is now tear it down to parts and sell them to some one else.

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It comes down to what someone will pay on the day.

That is very true, unfortunately there are people out there with more money than sense who want a toy to play with. I have a good friend who is very much into MTB and thinks nothing of spending £5k to £6k on a mountain bike. Money is not a problem with him so can afford it. I at the other end of the scale find it hard to imagine someone wanting to part with that much money for a bike. While there are people out there willing to pay this sort of money for a jeep, it will carry on. But that puts the avro bloke in the collecting world at a disadvantage because it's always out of reach. Great for the seller but is the average jeep really worth upwards of £15k to £20k I personally I don't think they are and a lot of the guys I hang around with think the same, some even have jeeps and say if people are willing to pay that sort of money then we will keep selling them for that price.

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There will always be someone in a shed with bits of something, and an idea or a dream, are they the ones who really have all of the fun?

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Posted (edited)

With WW2 era. Jeeps - there is so much you need to know about the subject , what to look for. I was in to Jeeps almost 50 years ago , there was hardly any books on the subject Undoubtedly there are some worth £15 to £20 K and above - however the vast majority of MB are not. Here we may be talking about imports from Greece where the identities are lost , Ex-France MALT bitsa , where the owner has decided the content was more Willys or Ford because the tub was scripted and then over several years aimed it in that direction - these are the ones you need to know them to avoid them.

 

I actually rate a genuine Hotchkiss as it should be - not with divided rims , Solex changed to Carter etc. etc. to 6 volt conversion white star on the bonnet etc. etc. Normally the Ex-British army demobbed and in private hands for over 50 years can be interesting , not so the ones $hagged and rotted , sold as a bath-tub of bits for re-cycle , / fitted a new body.

 

10 years ago I was offered a absolute minta MB , that was quietly for sale - the asking price was £10,000.

 

In the NE , there is possibly only just a single MA - when I see it in a line up of 10 or more (Inc. the odd Foley supplied Filipino body) , then I always go and view the MA first. On rarity regardless of condition - that must be rated quite £ high if not top $

 

1970 /71 No names no pack drill.. The THE man at Darlington who had them stacked 4 high in the THE D'ton Forge tin-shed would offer you the one he was driving around town (pride of the fleet - £400) , that is if he was available due to his other trailer business activeties LoL ISTR he was sourcing them direct from US bases nominally RAF stations. After just a few years the Jeeps dried up and he was flogging Sherpa pick-ups from the same source.

 

So work inflation in to the formula , how much would you pay for a early 1970's semi priced at £6,000 / £8,000 - roughly £100,000 +

 

Of course not everybody can afford the best quality Jeep , some just wish to drive and enjoy / show them - just it does seem the opening is more difficult for this person presently.

 

===

 

More or less the same is applicable to Lightweights but in different ways , ££ prices all over and so they should be.

Edited by ruxy
spelin

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Posted (edited)
Here are a few sellers who still think their vehicles are worth it!

 

http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C901221

 

http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C901558

 

I think the finder of the GAZ is probably looking for a free flight home!

 

Wow, a Land Rover with the wrong engine and registered 10 years later than they stopped making that version and all for around 5 times more than no end of others on the market, I thought that was the most ridiculous ad I have seen until I read the next one where a man will show you some scrap Russian vehicles in a village somewhere in Kazakhstan so you can speak to the owners son about a price he doesn't know about, all for $3,000, an air ticket, hotel, hire car, food and no-doubt some money to hire the hit man to mug you when you get there,, any takers !!!!

 

I have to say I've never seen anything sensible on car & classic only very expensive things with sellers chancing their arms but this does take it to another level !!!!

Edited by w896andy

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Wow, a Land Rover with the wrong engine and registered 10 years later than they stopped making that version and all for around 5 times more than no end of others on the market, I thought that was the most ridiculous ad I have seen until I read the next one where a man will show you some scrap Russian vehicles in a village somewhere in Kazakhstan so you can speak to the owners son about a price he doesn't know about, all for $3,000, an air ticket, hotel, hire car, food and no-doubt some money to hire the hit man to mug you when you get there,, any takers !!!!

 

I have to say I've never seen anything sensible on car & classic only very expensive things with sellers chancing their arms but this does take it to another level !!!!

 

The 'X' Suffix Reg. plate - would be correct under the old rules , if it were first registered between 01/8/1982 and 01/8/1983 - and that is a possibility.

 

However , 1972 - so much wrong , must be the last S2A Rover 1 that Solihull bolted together. It would not have had the early style front wings and headlamps in the radiator panel - so much wrong , if it still had a 2286cc 4 banger - then I may have been inclined to nit-pick , the list is too long.

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Just out of curiosity - could you build one from scratch without having the power train, frame and body at all? Basically by buying every part from a specialist supplier or sourcing from sales ads??

 

WOW! - £33,750 FOR A JEEP !!!

 

it would be interesting to work out exactly how much a jeep would cost to build from scratch - as the advert for the auction stated that particular jeep was a complete restoration / re-build - so how much would it cost to visit the various jeep parts suppliers and do the same ? - would it really be £33,750...?

 

No it would be the thick end of £9K plus purchase price assuming you stared with the power train, frame and body in repairable condition and you do all the work yourself apart from the block machining and do not cost for time:

 

Engine machining and full rebuild

Gearbox and transfer case complete rebuild

Axles overhauled all bearings replaced

Rad recored

All seals replaced

Rewire

New tires

New canvas

Paint

Odds and sods

 

Pete

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Here are a few sellers who still think their vehicles are worth it!

 

http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C901221

 

http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C901558

 

I think the finder of the GAZ is probably looking for a free flight home!

 

A Land rover for that price is just plain crazy, who in their right mind would even think about buying that. That's just pure greed.

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Now that blocks are being cast a huge stumbling block ( pun intended) has been removed however currently gearbox, transfer box and axle cases are still required as original units once these have been sourced everything else comes off the self in one form or another and can be ordered from your arm chair with the aid of your flexible friend.........but what you have is a kit car with no history or the remotest whiff of provenance :undecided: .

 

It would take this thread way off course if we start discussing where restoration ends and new build begins, many a pint has been supped around camp fires at shows doing just that without any agreement ever having been reached as far as I know so if anyone feels bold enough to hold an opinion it's probably best done in a new thread.

 

But be warned it can become a hot topic :beatenup:

 

Pete

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