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smiffy

Crossley IGL 3

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Spent this evening sorting out bits of clutch .As this is really a re-restoration of a restoration I started more years ago than I care to remember I dont have many before and after photos. The original clutch drive plate was nearly half rusted away .

Fortunately I have a spare ,the friction material was held on with corks pressed through the drive plate . The holes in the drive plate are fitted with brass ferrules .

The toggles were badly worn where they had been rubbing on the thrust bearing . I welded the end up using Stubbs 65 welding rods and ground them to shape . attachment.php?attachmentid=127144&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=127145&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=127146&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=127147&stc=1

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The original clutch drive plate was nearly half rusted away

 

That looks like an easy part to make by submitting a drawing to a laser-cutting emporium.

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I cannot get my head around the versatility of lasers, and there myriad of uses.

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As removed the gear box was in reasonable condition mainly due to being covered in a very thick layer of heavy gear oil that had leaked out of the front and rear seals .

I replaced the seals and bearings, fortunately the internals were in good order

Originally it had been fitted with a pto compressor for tyres and pumping up the Gruss air springs . This had been removed and a pto had been fitted to drive a piston hydraulic pump for a hydraulic tipping body. This had been fitted in about 1947 when the lorry had been working in a quarry

I have both compressor and pto complete with hydraulic pump but the body and ram have long gone

The U/J are large about 6 inch od and are bronze caps running on hardened pins ,the centre of the yoke is hollow and according to the maintenance chart should be filled with 1/4 pint of heavy oil every 300 miles . The oil leaking out of the U/Js had gone a long way to protect the inside of the chassis.attachment.php?attachmentid=128693&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128694&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128695&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128696&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128697&stc=1

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When I see things like the UJ design and the varied thread types you were discussing in a previous post it demonstrates to me in a very physical way just how the automotive industry was still developing and evolving in that inter war period.

 

I see the same sort of anomalies with the Leyland Retriever which essentially uses early 30's design concepts on a 1940 built truck. I'm constantly struck by areas of gross over engineering in one component coupled with the use of BA threads somewhere else, it all adds up to a high degree of hands on at the build stage and the requirement for skilled operation and maintenance in service.

 

Very much enjoying this thread please keep posting progress

 

Pete

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Thanks for your interest in my restoration . As regards odd mixes of threads the governor springs in the auto advance are held in place by 8-36 unf a real oddball size .The old bolts were well past there sell by date but luckily i had some in stock as its a very difficult size to obtain in the UK

 

The steering gear is of very odd design . The steering box is very light for its application and is of a size I would expect to see on a heavy car not a commercial vehicle

attachment.php?attachmentid=128858&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128857&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128860&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128859&stc=1 Prop shaft is also very basic design

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Thanks for your interest in my restoration . As regards odd mixes of threads the governor springs in the auto advance are held in place by 8-36 unf a real oddball size .The old bolts were well past there sell by date but luckily i had some in stock as its a very difficult size to obtain in the UK

 

The steering gear is of very odd design . The steering box is very light for its application and is of a size I would expect to see on a heavy car not a commercial vehicle

attachment.php?attachmentid=128858&stc=1attachment.php?attachmentid=128857&stc=1 Prop shaft is also very basic design

 

You are correct about the steering box being car like here is the 1912 Crossley Car steering box, almost the same.

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That is a very similar box in size, does it have a quadrant gear or a full gear ? On mine it is a full gear , I assume so that the worm can be moved to a fresh section as ware takes place also on mine the depth of engagement of the worm and gear is adjusted by a eccentric bush which is locked in place only by a tab washer . The advance retard and hand throttle quadrant are the same as some of the Crossley cars I have looked atattachment.php?attachmentid=128911&stc=1

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That is a very similar box in size, does it have a quadrant gear or a full gear ? On mine it is a full gear , I assume so that the worm can be moved to a fresh section as ware takes place also on mine the depth of engagement of the worm and gear is adjusted by a eccentric bush which is locked in place only by a tab washer . The advance retard and hand throttle quadrant are the same as some of the Crossley cars I have looked at

 

I have set up 3 worn early Crossley boxes with eccentric bushes on the wormwheel shaft. Where the gear is a quadrant greater wear occurs over the mid range, so just moving the eccentrics causes the meshing to interfere when nearing the ends of travel. My solution which is somewhat frowned upon by my fitter is to rotate the eccentrics from differing directions, so as to skew the quadrant very slightly. This sounds like poor practice but gives minimal backlash and has worked well for many thousands of miles!

 

Here is a typical early quadrant from the Shuttleworth 15hp Crossley:

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Edited by Charawacky

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Some years ago I had a few spares cast these included 2 control quadrants ,front bearing caps and oil filler caps just in case

I found another Crossley to restore attachment.php?attachmentid=128923&stc=1

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When I originally found the Crossley all 3 front chassis cross members had rusted away to nothing . I was never happy with the new ones so I made some more. The engine and gear box sit on their own sub-frame that is supported on spherical bronze bearing at each end so any distortion of the main chassis is not transmitted to the flange mounted engine or gear box .

The chassis member that supported the front sub frame mount had completely disappeared along with the radiator support member

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As the chassis rails are tapered the new rails have to be fed in from the rear which is a bit of a pain as the next chassis member is original and riveted in .

Fortunately just after the rear of the front spring hangers the chassis is a bit wider and it is just possible to get them in

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Have made a bit more progress and acquired some suitable headlamps and just tried them for size. Also fitted up one front suspension unit

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When i originally rebuilt the air springs I fitted modern hydraulic ram seals ,I now have obtained some correct leather seals 

so another job to do  

The handbrake ratchets were well past there sell by date so made some new ones . I could not work out a easy way to cut the ratchets , a shaper would have been ideal but that is one machine I dont have . So cut them by hand with a hacksaw 

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Neat bit of sawing. I must admit that I gave in with the Thorny and had the quadrant laser cut. It certainly took the graft out of it!

Did you have the leathers made or did you find a supplier? I don't think these springs were that commen even when they were new so finding some is quite a bonus.

Keep up the good work. I am certainly enjoying the reports!

 

Steve    :)

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I did consider getting the ratchets laser cut but cutting them out did not take long at all and I do try and do everything myself

The cupwashers I had made by http://www.cheshireleather.com/contact-us.html   They made a very good job of them , turn around time about 7 days . The price was good and  very helpful to deal with, even phoning me after I received them to make sure I was happy with them.

I have several leather  gaiters to make and have brought a singer 29k sowing machine that is suitable for leather ,so a lot of new skills to learn as I have  only done metal stitching before

  Mike

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Wire spark-erosion out of pre-hardened gauge-plate would also have given a very good result. (and without the risk to the heat-treatment or the tapered kerf of laser cutting)

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Photos of the sewing machine I hope to use to make the leather gaiters with . Made in 1904 and still works well ,just need some leather and to get the hang of using it.

The other job today was repairing the hand brake shaft , The shaft was keyed 3/8 but the key way in operating arm was only broached 5/16 and a stepped key had been fitted so made a correct sized guide and rebroached the arm to 3/8 . I can only think that this had been like that since new . The old key way was badly worn and the key nearly sheared    Mike

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Nice sewing machine.

Does it have a set of needles? I had a problem with my former sewing machine in that the locating flat on the needle shank was 90 degrees out from any needle I could find.

Trevor

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The needle fittted when I brought it has a round shank .I will order some of the correct needles and see what turns up, 

On this machine the thread is fed down the centre of the sewing head  so is different from other machines also it has a walking foot that feeds the material. This  can be moved through 360 degrees so you can sew in any direction without having to turn the material round  Still working out how to set it up ,so a bit of learning curve   Mike

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That sounds like one mean sewing machine. I love using them, so many things become possible that one never considered before. Just say no to curtains and cushions ;)

 

trevor

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I just give one of those machines from my uncles saddler workshop to a museum last month.

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Thanks to another member on this forum  PITT24423  I now have a spare engine  .This engine is out of a 4x4 crossley ,the main difference being the sump and as it is of later manufacture the crankcase is cast iron  . According to some drawings I have the crank shaft is the same but the camshaft has a different profile . I will look at using the blocks ,pistons and con rods as the ones on my existing engine are not in the best of health .

I have finished the simms auto advance retard unit . The springs that hold the 3 cams under tension were past there sell by date so acquired some  clock springs of the correct size from   a friend . For the inner springs I softened the springs to reshape them and as they can be difficult to get to a even temperature to re temper  I lay them on a tray of brass swarf which is then heated . This makes it easy to judge the colour for tempering without over heating the thin spring steel

  

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