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smiffy

Crossley IGL 3

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3 hours ago, smiffy said:

The springs that hold the 3 cams under tension were past there sell by date so acquired some  clock springs of the correct size from   a friend . For the inner springs I softened the springs to reshape them and as they can be difficult to get to a even temperature to re temper  I lay them on a tray of brass swarf which is then heated . This makes it easy to judge the colour for tempering without over heating the thin spring steel

I wouldn't expect that to work, as thin spring steel typically gets it properties from the cold work rather than heat treatment. 

If you find that there is a problem, then try again cold-forming the springs. 

(If I have a speciality, this is it, I did postdoctoral research on spring steel materials for retraction springs. I even had my own rolling mill to work with)

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I only know what works for me . My other interest is clock making and I follow the procedures laid out by W J Gazeley ,Brittan and John Wilding in their books on clock making and repair..

I start with a broken main spring which for the main outer springs I cut to length and machine the slots . This can be done without annealing and retempering . The problem is with the springs that act onto the snail cams inside the unit .These have very tight bends in them . I had to anneal  the spring  or it snapped when bending . It is then too soft to act as a spring .I heat the spring to a bright red and quench in oil . I then polished them to a bright finish . and   heat them until they become blue -purple and quench them in clean water. 

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1 hour ago, smiffy said:

I only know what works for me . My other interest is clock making and I follow the procedures laid out by W J Gazeley ,Brittan and John Wilding in their books on clock making and repair..

Thinking about it, I have read a couple of books on clockmaking myself, and seem to recall something about "white springs" and "blue springs". 

My research was entirely on what would be termed "white springs" and I think that, on reflection, the "blue spring" technology you are using is correct both for the springs you are using and the age of the vehicle. 

I suggest that you ignore me in future :-)

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I have not had any time to work on the Crossley for nearly a year but have built a new workshop for my other project so should have a bit more space . I now have most of the parts so should be able to start putting it all back together and started with the air springs  I had ordered some new leather seals which I have fitted and they are now ready to be fitted back on the chassis .

Hopefully I will get back on track over the next few months but must remember to stop getting involved with more new project

Mike

crossley air spring.jpg

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Last year  I acquired a spare engine It is from a much later 4x4 truck but the blocks piston , con rods and crankshaft are the same.

Today I made a start on stripping it down . It always amazes me that even when parts look completely  rusted together how easily nuts and bolts can come undone . When I  I try to do the same with modern nuts and bolts  it usually ends having to resort to cutting them off .I can only assume that the steel used is of a different quality .

 Hope fully the con rods will be better than the ones in my other engine 

 

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Edited by smiffy
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I stripped the new engine down and removed the pistons. I decided to remove the pistons out of the top of the blocks as this was the shortest distance and they were badly corroded in the bores ,so hand to make a horseshoe washer and pushing tube to enable me to push on the piston and not the conrod  .

Before attempting to remove the pistons I  boiled the blocks in oil for several hours to try and get some lubrication past the pistons . This only had limited success and the pistons took considerable force to press out

I have decided to use the parts to build a spare engine as I have a spare correct aluminium  crankcase  . The engine I stripped down has a cast iron crankcase  The blocks will need boring out and fitting with egg shell liners and at the same time  have valve seat inserts fitted as the valve seats are very badly pitted.

By fitting egg shell liners I hope to be able to use the existing pistons and just fit new rings as i have had no luck trying to obtain new pistons 

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piston removal tool.jpg

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i will carry on rebuilding my original engine as i have enough parts . The pistons are of a rather odd design as they are machined right through below the oil control ring and the crown of the piston is only attached by 2 luggs cast up above the gudgeon  pin.

I have refitted the mag and auto advance . The drive chain adjustment is for camshaft and mag is by sliding the housing out and to lock it in place the mag support bracket is serrated and locked with serrate washes .

I will set the timing with the piston at T D C and set the valves on the bounce,  and hope this is about right 

piston 1.jpg

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piston tdc.jpg

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I think you will have to set the mag timing a few degrees before TDC. Good luck.

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8 minutes ago, Citroman said:

I think you will have to set the mag timing a few degrees before TDC. Good luck.

I am referring to the valve timing   at tdc not the mag timing  which will be set at a max of 30 degrees btdc

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I have assembled most of the engine .having replace all the manifold stud etc . The exhaust manifold had one broken flange which I machined off flat and having cut a new flange   I welded it on using  a 29/9 rod 

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My thoughts are turning towards getting the truck mobile as I need to turn it around soon  . Can anyone point me in the right direction to obtain 900 x 20 bar grip tyres . The last time I required some was over 20 years ago and they were readily available but now it seems to be a different story.

  Mike

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1 hour ago, smiffy said:

My thoughts are turning towards getting the truck mobile as I need to turn it around soon  . Can anyone point me in the right direction to obtain 900 x 20 bar grip tyres . The last time I required some was over 20 years ago and they were readily available but now it seems to be a different story.

  Mike

Hi Mike,

Have you seen this >

https://www.bigtyres.co.uk/9-00-20-12-ply-malhotra-military-m-88-bar-grip-tt.html

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3 hours ago, Richard Farrant said:

Thanks , I had seen these tyres but was hoping to find some part worn . When I last brought any tyres there seemed to be plenty around but that would not appear to be the case now . I will just have to bight the bullet and buy some . I have promised  my better half an extension and new kitchen next year , she might not understand that tyres are more important than a new cooker

Mike

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20 minutes ago, smiffy said:

Thanks , ... she might not understand that tyres are more important than a new cooker

Never skimp on anything that comes between you and the ground. That includes shoes, beds, sofas and tyres. But not, you will notice, cookers. 

Incidentally, when cooker-shopping you might want to consider those that offer pyrolytic cleaning, the higher temperature is likely to be more useful for tempering and annealing parts. 

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I only need some tyres to get the truck mobile they would not be used on the road , so will try and get some  casings .The new tyres will not be needed  for some time yet.

  Mike

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Fitted the engine today. It sits on a sub frame which is is mounted in  plain bearing at the front , is ridge mounted in the middle and a spherical bearing at the rear.

Once the engine is fitted it is very difficult to work on  ., even changing the started motor or water pump is awkward .

 

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Real progress looks very good

couple of questions is your mag a Simms SRM4?  and have you had it serviced ?

Pete

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7 hours ago, Pete Ashby said:

Real progress looks very good

couple of questions is your mag a Simms SRM4?  and have you had it serviced ?

Pete

Yes mag is  SRM 4. I think that I fitted new bearing ,but it was over 30 years ago. I do have a few spares in various states of repair .that I will  repairing if the need arises.

The mag was the wrong direction of rotation when I aquired  it, so I reversed the direction . It has a good spark so will leave it alone.

I stared getting the gear box into shape to refit fortunately its in fair order , When I started this restoration i 1985 I fitted new bearings and fitted lip seals in place of the original felt seals .

The gearbox is a real sod to fit . as it has to be lifted up from underneath and is a very tight  fit. . It also sits on a sub frame ,with a carden shaft to the clutch .It was obviously fitted before the cab .

I cleared all the bits of the rear  to start assessing what needs doing . When I started this project I did a huge amount of work on the axles and breaks etc  

Hopefully this is still ok but it will require a lot of work to get it to a good standard

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13 hours ago, smiffy said:

Yes mag is  SRM 4. I think that I fitted new bearing ,but it was over 30 years ago. I do have a few spares in various states of repair .that I will  repairing if the need arises.

The mag was the wrong direction of rotation when I aquired  it, so I reversed the direction . It has a good spark so will leave it alone.

 

The reason I asked is I have an SRM 4 on the Leyland that I think is giving me problems and I suspect it is condenser related and wondered if you had found a reliable company to service your unit.  I v'e found a number of firms on the web with prices that seem to vary considerably and I always like a 'happy customer recommendation' if I can find it.

I'm interested in your comment about reversing the rotation of the mag, I too have a spare unit with the wrong rotation for my engine could I ask how did you go about changing the direction ? 

Pete

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Simms SRM4 direction  reversal 

Remove points cover and distributor cap 

Undo screw in middle of cam 

Make a small puller and remove cam ,note the letter stamp on the cam to indicate rotation direction

Remove backing plate behind points 

Find the dot on the small gear which should line up with either the L or R mark om the distributor gear 

and set appropriately

Replace cam in correct position  

remark direction on mag body so you dont forget that the arrow on the oil cap is now in the wrong direction

 

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Many thanks Mike for that full explanation with the bonus of photos,  much appreciated

I'll dig the spare out from under the bench and see about changing it over.

regards 

Pete

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