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Anyone want to save this Robin Hanger

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Any more details?

 

a) what sort of timeline does the farmer have for wanting it removed

 

b) is it the "standard" size Robin Hangar (by the looks of the external photos it probably is - 60 ft across)?

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Any more details?

 

a) what sort of timeline does the farmer have for wanting it removed

 

b) is it the "standard" size Robin Hangar (by the looks of the external photos it probably is - 60 ft across)?

 

Hi, Does anyone happen to know the pitch of the roof of the standard Robin Hanger?, is it 22 degrees?

 

Cheers, Jim.

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Thanks for these, they are always good to have sources especially drawings

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What is the roof covering and sides, some pictures make me wonder if they are asbestos sheets

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What is the roof covering and sides, some pictures make me wonder if they are asbestos sheets

 

The National Archive drwg indicates the roofing material and wall cladding would have been/probably is asbestos.

 

Mind you, from the photos the walls look to be clad in "wriggly tin"

 

If you were to reuse you'd probably re-clad in plastic coated profile cladding or cement board.

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The National Archive drwg indicates the roofing material and wall cladding would have been/probably is asbestos.

 

Mind you, from the photos the walls look to be clad in "wriggly tin"

 

If you were to reuse you'd probably re-clad in plastic coated profile cladding or cement board.

 

Just some thing for who wants it to think of when dismantling and using power tools

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What is the roof covering and sides, some pictures make me wonder if they are asbestos sheets

 

The Asbestos issue had sprung to mind - got to get it removed from my own Garage (and then dispose of it)!!!

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Posted (edited)
Its still on Google Earth imagery from 2016 - north of the A66 just before the start of the Temple Sowerby bypass

 

If you are interested in wriggley tin buildings and follow the A66 , then just a few miles east of Temple Sowerby , just 1/4 mile before the western slip-road in to the village of Crackenthorpe. There still stands the most tiny tin-tabernacle church / tin-chapel , abt. 40 years ago it was quite pristine , it stands only 10 ft away from the A66 - if ever the road is made Dual-Carriageway in total LoL - then I suspect it will go in some re-alignment. In passing I have noticed the steady deterioration , it must have been made from good stuff but probably too new for the original thicker iron sheets ?

Edited by ruxy
spelin

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my local farm has no use for this Robin Hanger anymore, but would like it to go to a good home if anyone is interested ?

 

The de Havilland Aircraft Museum is currently fund raising for a new hangar. If the hangar is still looking for a new home perhaps you or the farmer could contact the museum.

 

http://www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk/

 

Another museum that may like it, is the Newark Air Museum:-

 

http://www.newarkairmuseum.org/

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If you are interested in wriggley tin buildings and follow the A66 , then just a few miles east of Temple Sowerby , just 1/4 mile before the western slip-road in to the village of Crackenthorpe. There still stands the most tiny tin-tabernacle church / tin-chapel , abt. 40 years ago it was quite pristine , it stands only 10 ft away from the A66 - if ever the road is made Dual-Carriageway in total LoL - then I suspect it will go in some re-alignment. In passing I have noticed the steady deterioration , it must have been made from good stuff but probably too new for the original thicker iron sheets ?

 

That could well be one of the famous Boulton & Paul corrugated iron clad chapels . We still have one here at Old Heath on the outskirts of Colchester . Not many left now .

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There’s an unusual church in Deepcut. It’s St Barbara’s, the garrison church of the Royal Logistic Corps (I meant, the RAOC!). The Church was built in 1901 to serve the Deepcut and Blackdown army training camps, and was dedicated as St Michael and All Angels Garrison Church. It was only in 1967 that the church was re-named St Barbara’s Garrison Church.

Built from wood and corrugated iron, it’s an interesting, and quirky church. No good as an aircraft hangar though. As you would expect in a garrison church, it contains flags, memorial plaques, and has some wonderful stained glass windows. My REME father married his first wife, a WRAC, there in 1950 or 51.

St Barbara Tin Church Deepcut.jpg

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