Jump to content
philm1

Scorpion/Scimitar Restoration in New Zealand

Recommended Posts

I can sence competition, are you going head to head with the Tank factory for finish? High class work.

 

Thanks. The Tank Factory is a class above us but we still hope to do a quality job within our abilities and budget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do set the bench mark at some height. I would describe my work as inch out engineering by comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2nd top coat to Hull interior completed so we can now start to think of where to begin on the puzzle of putting everything back together after a clean, refurbish, replace as the case maybe. I'm looking foward to bolting the horn back in 1st as it has been sitting patiently now for awhile.

 

SAM_2277.jpg

SAM_2272.jpg

SAM_2273.jpg

SAM_2276.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some photos of New Zealand Scorpions in service. Originally green until later painted in Merdec disruptive cammo scheme.

NZ !.JPG

IMG_0185.jpg

NZ 2.JPG

NZ 3.JPG

NZ 4.JPG

nz scorpion 5.jpg

nz scorpion 6.jpg

nz scorpion 10.jpg

nz scorpion.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We also like the plain white colour that ours was painted when in Belgium service. Possibly ours was deployed to Operation Restore Hope Somalia?

15731578_666422320230224_582338514_n.jpg

belgian (002).jpg

Scorpion FV101 CVRT (6) (002).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stonking work Phil. That is going to be running before I come out to see you.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stonking work Phil. That is going to be running before I come out to see you.

David

 

We are looking forward to seeing you. In what year though so we can worth to that time line??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would appreciate feedback on removing and refurbishing the turret ring. Currently stiff to turn probably as a result of sitting for so long. Are there any must do's and especially dont's??

IMG_2050.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I remember they come apart fairly easily but it was a long time ago ! you just undo the allen head bolts and it separates , I think there were several pieces to each ring so if the don't have pin punch marks or numbers stamped on them do it yourself as they like going back the same way. we used dry lube on the ball bearings as the Waiouru dust would quickly clog up grease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phil,

If the CVRT turret rings are similar to most other vehicles, eg. Matilda, Staghound, Grant/Lee etc, they are very

straight forward. They disassemble into 2 main sections and with a thin keeper ring that serves to lock the balls in. There is no continuous cage as such that you would know from a regular ball bearing. There are usually bronze spacer plates that serve 6 or 8 balls - effectively the cage but not continuous.

I would expect that the grease may have dried out. If this is the case, pull it apart,

BUT look for any shims, if you find them number them and make sure to match their location with corresponding numbers on the race. You should then just need to clean everything, re-lube and put it all together again. Do your homework on lubes as I would be worried in your climate that a dry lube would not be sufficient protection from moisture. Perhaps Morey's Big Red (I may not have that name spot on) could be worth investigating. It is a chassis lube and intended to act as a dust and water barrier.

 

Have a look here on my website for a section drawing of a turret ring:

 

http://www.members.iinet.net.au/~dgrev/dhmg/stagints.html

 

Worst case scenario is that the turret has been left off at some time. If this is the case, rain will have got in and wrecked the balls. If so, you would be in need of over 100 1 1/8th or 1 1/4 steel balls. Not cheap! Hopefully not what has happened.

 

Being such a light vehicle there is the possibility that the ring is alloy not steel. This being the case, don't be surprised if you find ceramic balls. If so, you need to do your homework about correct lubricant. The T50 turret on the M113s had ceramic balls and they had issues. I think they were later superceded with Acetal (an engineering plastic) balls which have good load bearing properties. This may be what Secondshooter is referring to and the use of dry lubricants.

 

Regards

Doug

Broken Hill

Australia

Edited by dgrev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From what I remember they come apart fairly easily but it was a long time ago ! you just undo the allen head bolts and it separates , I think there were several pieces to each ring so if the don't have pin punch marks or numbers stamped on them do it yourself as they like going back the same way. we used dry lube on the ball bearings as the Waiouru dust would quickly clog up grease.

 

Thanks for the info. Did you work on Scorpions here in NZ? If so where do you live now as most welcome to come see the project if nearby Upper Hutt at any stage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil,

If the CVRT turret rings are similar to most other vehicles, eg. Matilda, Staghound, Grant/Lee etc, they are very

straight forward. They disassemble into 2 main sections and with a thin keeper ring that serves to lock the balls in. There is no continuous cage as such that you would know from a regular ball bearing. There are usually bronze spacer plates that serve 6 or 8 balls - effectively the cage but not continuous.

I would expect that the grease may have dried out. If this is the case, pull it apart,

BUT look for any shims, if you find them number them and make sure to match their location with corresponding numbers on the race. You should then just need to clean everything, re-lube and put it all together again. Do your homework on lubes as I would be worried in your climate that a dry lube would not be sufficient protection from moisture. Perhaps Morey's Big Red (I may not have that name spot on) could be worth investigating. It is a chassis lube and intended to act as a dust and water barrier.

 

Have a look here on my website for a section drawing of a turret ring:

 

http://www.members.iinet.net.au/~dgrev/dhmg/stagints.html

 

Worst case scenario is that the turret has been left off at some time. If this is the case, rain will have got in and wrecked the balls. If so, you would be in need of over 100 1 1/8th or 1 1/4 steel balls. Not cheap! Hopefully not what has happened.

 

Being such a light vehicle there is the possibility that the ring is alloy not steel. This being the case, don't be surprised if you find ceramic balls. If so, you need to do your homework about correct lubricant. The T50 turret on the M113s had ceramic balls and they had issues. I think they were later superceded with Acetal (an engineering plastic) balls which have good load bearing properties. This may be what Secondshooter is referring to and the use of dry lubricants.

 

Regards

Doug

Broken Hill

Australia

 

Thanks Doug. We'll start looking at the turret ring soon. Working on getting it back on its tracks is short term goal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having pulled the front torsion bars and repaired the chanel we decided to carry on and remove the rest. At least we know then that all the torsion bars are serviceable. The channels are full of lovely gunk so we will steam clean those before reassembly.

SAM_2408.jpg

SAM_2409.jpg

SAM_2410.jpg

SAM_2411.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the last picture, to what vehicle does that tire belong to please?

 

Hi Robin. Tyre belongs to Brett's MK1 Ferret.

SAM_1202.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A start to putting some bits back on.

 

Brett first off the mark with the rear idler wheel axles and hydraulic rams.

 

I just had to get the horn bolted back in.

SAM_2405.jpg

SAM_2415.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the horn actually work? Many of that type I've encountered have been somewhat mute!

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy

 

I have these on several vehicles and can assure you that when they work, they really do. One use for this version of horn was

as the fire alarm in Centurion tanks. More than loud......

 

Other than if they have been under water, they seem to be a very well engineered design.

 

Regards

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does the horn actually work? Many of that type I've encountered have been somewhat mute!

 

Andy

 

Hi Andy. It didn't work initially so I pulled it all apart remembering where everything went (until it came time to put it back together Ummmmmm). The Ferret one is the same so I has a looksy inside that one. Once all back together and after a little bit of fiddling it does actually work (LOUD).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Andy. It didn't work initially so I pulled it all apart remembering where everything went (until it came time to put it back together Ummmmmm). The Ferret one is the same so I has a looksy inside that one. Once all back together and after a little bit of fiddling it does actually work (LOUD).

 

:-D

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things have been a bit slow as late as both Brett and I have been flat out with our day jobs.

 

When it came to remove the far side torsion bars we found we were short about 3 inches as the wall was in the way. What to do - Option 1. try and move the hull across but it's sitting on axle stands. Option 2. remove the wall.

We went for option 2 which actually worked out quite well as as it's an internal with steel sheeting. By removing the bottom bolts holding the sheets on we were able to get just enough flex in the sheets to get the torsion bars out.

I have now cleaned out all the channels by using de greaser and pushing several old rags through with a pole. Similar I guess to cleaning a large barrel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent well over an hour washing out my torsion tunnels with a hot-water pressure washer and still was getting unpleasant goo out.

Hard to get into the corners.

It's a pity that the caustic chemical stripper-baths are so bad for Al, it would be so nice to just dip the whole hull into a boiling vat of MEK or something and have all the paint and gunk just melt off.

 

Things have been a bit slow as late as both Brett and I have been flat out with our day jobs.

 

When it came to remove the far side torsion bars we found we were short about 3 inches as the wall was in the way. What to do - Option 1. try and move the hull across but it's sitting on axle stands. Option 2. remove the wall.

We went for option 2 which actually worked out quite well as as it's an internal with steel sheeting. By removing the bottom bolts holding the sheets on we were able to get just enough flex in the sheets to get the torsion bars out.

I have now cleaned out all the channels by using de greaser and pushing several old rags through with a pole. Similar I guess to cleaning a large barrel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somewhat ahead ofourselves but looking at the turret I wonder what is actually holding the gun barrel in place?

 

Would I be correct in thinking that a twist and a pull and itshould come out?

 

 

SAM_1927.jpg

SAM_1929.jpg

SAM_2368.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your breech ring seems to have gone missing, so are you sure the barrel hasn't been welded in place?

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×