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bobs1918

FWD arrives

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Wow! Is that load bed original? That might be the only one left...[/quote

 

:red: Yes indeed all original I hope to preserve it

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I do like the look of the workshop equipment, no doubt you can explain the functions of the universal equipment, it appears to be driven via a 'grad-start' electrical drive?

A flat bed Drummond lathe I unfortunately sold had a grad start which I think may have been used in a workshop truck?

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Today was separation day...That is the removal of the body from the chassis.All went well and the body now rests on the back of a c 1926 Commercial Electric truckIMG_0816.jpg

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I have not seen anything like that before. I cant see how it works. Must be something for one of the machine tools.

Have you got a copy of the American car and foundry company history?

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Hi bobs1918,

 

It looks very like a speedo drive that would have been driven from the back of the gearbox or the propshaft, Stewart-Warner made something similar.

 

 

Andy

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Ran across an old print in my files of a machine shop truck so I am posting it here in case it might be of use. The image is from 1918 and that's about all the context there is on it. I found it as I looking for some sort of an instruction manual for the machine shop I may once have had. It's on one 20 year old inventory of stuff but I don't find it now. I'll keep looking.

 

MS-18.jpg

 

PS- Accidentally loaded the ammo body pic but decided to leave it for grins.

WWI, Ammo Body.jpg

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Not sure what this geared unit is for. Maybe a PTO for one of the machines?

 

I would go with "speedometer" too. There might even be a skew-drive out the side for the cable?

 

Speedo drives were much chunkier back then, even on motorcycles:

http://s947.photobucket.com/user/1953Indian/media/Ner%20A%20Car%20with%20speedometer%20A.jpg.html

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OK I was wrong The manual does show a Stewart model 131M as original equipment..........So a little hunting led me to a very reasonable example IMG_2035.jpgMaybe not THE speedo but nobody will know. Sorry it is upside down.

IMG_2036.jpg

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Found a great fabricator in California, home of speed and custom shops. He was able to fabricate the missing engine panels.I still need to make a frame of 5mm round steel rod. The panel is then rolled around it and it gives the panel rigidityIMG_2034.jpgStill in the shipping box. It took a long time to find someone to make these for a reasonable price.

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We started work on the patterns and core boxes for the valve covers for the Wisconsin in Bob's

FWD. Interestingly the original piece we are using as a "go-by" arrived here in far northern Maine

from great Britain via Connecticut. I suspect at least one of you might have been involved with that

transaction. Having the actual part on hand has saved us quite a bit of work and... with it sitting on my desk at

school (soon to be shipped back from where it came) no small amount of wonder among the students. "A 1917 FWD?? What's that?"

 

Anyway, we (my students and I) started by developing a 3D model using Autodesk Inventor Professional. (I teach

Drafting & Engineering Technology to High School students). Once the model was completed we generated a set of 2D

working drawings. Usually I would disappear into my shop and turn this piece out using my old 1943 Southbend lathe. However.... this time I decided to use the Tormach PCNC 440 CNC mill we have newly installed in our classroom lab space.

 

Using Fusion 360 we generated the setups and the tool paths then post processed it to PathPilot. I cannot say it is faster than using the old Southbend but it sure is nice.

 

Here is a photo of the patterns ready to be mounted on the backerboard. The core boxes should be cut this week.

 

Jbiz3lqET9Vn8vnC7MzfiTtrrL5EgtHedAIo1BKp5x4Bx-O3AExhN0lqGJQ40MOwUIzAo5WPnxvntv7zqQ_9RpyNuTVmvww_9rQTTfxoR4qnvEY5mwpzMxuH_dK21JUwYhFo1fbfo4cEZY500lTIUW7VHXPfXvYDeQoeNlZxcubhDMKR7223KjzmS701y7-6-KR6Yf3-V2SEka3N59BJNId2xcEB--fnLZ1OB9aERQ8-bklDd3C5vQHl12JRz_r7tB933ujcO_bhKKMzXrbn5X8EbngChn-tholZibAlt69qQzvuf1LDJGTWeHw_43JsnA0v-1q_Vptye_TZpXB3auVzD2t0ZtGHXF5JjR13uklPPIPceZBOF5IB7Q3Ak8FDzTDbU8C1ssgx1bz9SPcAxm40_nW-M6HrJSwqzsLY0Nq5o_XpbYl80ZkpxsPxeOoi9CmZWFQOm2Pu4knKhUc_5RRBuL-OhDq9H8lglmIYAj1KdecS4WgtI9gdxgLV0oTe9fVoNClKJQyXMjStI3P1ngReT7Jg4SdLPz9eKfjub4AWIFvWQ-32r7j0Qf0zT3TeZ8Hg8jtwgGhqR0v6N3l9ts5CgQaWEC0N9SG0_rAFiN9SUDtRZrDmqFQmgamQjJWg2Rv78WFW5g=w267-h356-no

 

Best regards,

 

Terry

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Today we finished milling out the core boxes for the valve covers for Bob's FWD.

Again we used the Tormach 440 (Love this machine!)

 

Now we just need to mount the patterns on a backer board, seal and finish them.

The core boxes will be joined together and mounted in a frame and will be sealed

and finished as well - then its off to the foundry!

wmvbbXHJNDRzZXjg9uAeLpLgHRbkGm1fH1IowLbp8A0nQ9u4-4axpruX97IN7F-zSjtnGqFviOsGNGKLb25dL6o0Po05_R0l8S--pd-ypHUZluhl8N50KsgY720tBRfTyHBQ5YrbqmpxRvUm5p-2U-Oa1t0X7ItvoJtreGB_IBzfZgyAk0p6fKlGcOVCZTDhZLqYYJ8tsMhRB9jcXKpiJLhrd8sBsuwEejxzqT7a4v5kN-jHPn-DF_RcILhnr4xN5zGjHHM728vYndIy47Whq2FA69wh5QSZvAQeMEIs2TDJYGytEMy504IrWbTfGPFLQkZJ5KnTO4nD7_LmtSsimbb60LnLxQtWo-4VwgPbMBu7pxCoF4MzYdcaO-Z1E3DlgE01BQE_TP1sYsYl-nZwAlmd6qGDJLyrf89ZAchZzrISNjSfDFY1rCOfaMJMXZMCyvLOgvuq7fp1lUWi9HIewzLFym-KgXDp3064NH_KQPew_dXli9giCI0mfmCKo-yZu6VwTy15grzspfWOo-2t7yFyXm1LGmDI2HvFn4ttlvP_69eHUSXpbfaJWPaPluxOFjgFNseKphffXeCxIzWsyfv9_oDUsXVUJfW7cMQ5lIVJljfBU5XK=w480-h640-no

Edited by Tharper

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Today we finished milling out the core boxes for the valve covers for Bob's FWD.

Again we used the Tormach 440 (Love this machine!)

 

If it is using Pathpilot then there is a bit of a coincidence there, I work on LinuxCNC.

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Hello there Terry

Yes the pattern cover came from Tim Gosling a member of this forum and a superb restorer . Tim I will post it back to you when I have it in my possession. Waiting for the rims to be returned with new rubber. It has been 3 months wait time and still not ready> only ONE company here in the states is doing hard rubber tyres and the wait time is normal for them. In the mean time truck is up on a dolly and can be moved on a railroad track. IT has been difficult to remove the wheels as the bearings are not cooperating. will try hydraulic porta-power this weekend.

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After many hours was able to remove the wheels from the axles. The bearings would not slide off It took the use of three porta-power hydraulic devices to force them off.

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