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New project - Mk 1 Knocker 6x6

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I am not sure of the "Mk1" Milly but surely it goes faster than 15mph, Mk3 should be up to around 50mph so why the need for beacons in normal road driving? I appreciate they are green and do not stand out too well at times and we all want to be safe but the chevrons on the back with normal sidelights (in the case of the Mk3) are up to modern standards (pretty much). :undecided:

Can't hurt I suppose and I am just curious, your trucks your rules. It helps that I am in Aberdeenshire and road traffic is not quite as busy as in your neck of the woods....:laugh:

 

cheers

Iain

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I am not sure of the "Mk1" Milly but surely it goes faster than 15mph, Mk3 should be up to around 50mph so why the need for beacons in normal road driving? I appreciate they are green and do not stand out too well at times and we all want to be safe but the chevrons on the back with normal sidelights (in the case of the Mk3) are up to modern standards (pretty much). :undecided:

Can't hurt I suppose and I am just curious, your trucks your rules. It helps that I am in Aberdeenshire and road traffic is not quite as busy as in your neck of the woods....:laugh:

 

cheers

Iain

 

Managed 52 mph in mine once Iain :D (gps speedo), for me it's the length of time the truck takes to get to that speed compared to the modern vehicles around it, I drive with lights on dipped beam too with some of the plonkers on our roads - painful experience from riding motorbikes put to good use.

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I am not sure of the "Mk1" Milly but surely it goes faster than 15mph, Mk3 should be up to around 50mph so why the need for beacons in normal road driving? I appreciate they are green and do not stand out too well at times and we all want to be safe but the chevrons on the back with normal sidelights (in the case of the Mk3) are up to modern standards (pretty much). :undecided:

Can't hurt I suppose and I am just curious, your trucks your rules. It helps that I am in Aberdeenshire and road traffic is not quite as busy as in your neck of the woods....:laugh:

 

cheers

Iain

 

The Mk 1 tops out at about 30 to 32 mph Iain. Very slow by modern standards and it takes a while to get there too.

So anything that reduces the risk of being rear-ended by someone who thinks it will pick up speed faster and generally go faster has to be a good thing. Modern drivers aren't - it seems - taught to make allowances for this type of vehicle. I saw what happens when cars argue with Militants back in the Seventies - the car always loses and only the other year we had the case where a slow moving MV - a Scammell I think - was rear ended by an artic whilst enroute home from a show.

 

So anything that reduces the risk of either type of collision has to be good - I'd rather go the extra mile in the warnings dept and have the peace of mind of knowing I've done all I possibly can to avoid rear end collisions. :)

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I see where you are coming from guys(excuse the pun) and totally understand. I must admit I have pondered the hazards of poor visibility in the event of a break down (I know unlikely with a Mk3 :D ) especially at night. So I used the strobes I had removed from my beavertail when I sold it and wired them up to be used with magnets and a booster pack or cigar lighter socket. I have also got a din mount beacon and some extensions, with a mount on the rear right box on the Milly and wired to the sidelights, easy to fit or remove as required. I have not got around to fitting the din mount yet.:blush: Its on my list !

 

~

 

Cheers

Iain

IMAG0244.jpg

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I saw these on Milweb and thought they might be an idea as they would double up on the rear lights. You would need to remove the triangles if used on a solo vehicle.

 

http://www.milweb.net/webvert/a1830

 

These are a good idea, with the correct reflectors of course ! Would also make great trailer boards :D

 

Actually, the parts in lights etc. are worth it.

 

Iain

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lane-closed-vehicle-sign-936890.jpg

 

Not so long ago a van driver on the M20 ran into the back of one of these, reckoned he didn't see it!!

 

So I reckon if they can fail to see something like this with all its' lights flashing, a dark green MV is on a proper sticky wicket as they say. The more lights, beacons, Hi-Vis Stripes, etc you can get, the better your chances.

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Even though my Bedford RL green goddess will sit happily at 40-45 mph, I agree with the idea of 'the more visible you are, the better'! Most drivers these days - cucooned in their shells, insulated from the world around them - just don't expect vehicles to be plodding along lane one of duel carriageways at 40.....

 

Mine had rear chevron marker plates fitted in service - for Op Fresco in 02/03- and I replaced these as the old ones were faded.

 

IMG_20140330_145839.jpg

 

I also bought a magnetic LED yellow beacon - no wiring needed. Not great during the day but much better at night or dawn / dusk. I also have LED bulbs in the front and rear side lights which I use as 'running lights' night and day.

 

IMG_20140330_150213.jpg

 

Duncan.

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The LED bulbs are good idea - esp,. for the rear lights! I am guessing that they are the same bulb on the Militant as the RL. Probably good for the front too. Think I will consider this as an option too.

 

For night times - anyone got any thoughts on improving the light output from the head lamps? I seem to remember they were not too great - light output was barely adequate even at 30.

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For night times - anyone got any thoughts on improving the light output from the head lamps? I seem to remember they were not too great - light output was barely adequate even at 30.

 

From memory the standard FV lamp pods will take a modern 7" headlamp unit which uses a 75/70 watt 24v H4 bulb.

Edited by radiomike7

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From memory the standard FV lamp pods will take a modern 7" headlamp unit which uses a 75/70 watt 24v H4 bulb.

 

Many thanks :-) Could be a worth while upgrade!! Found this site whilst looking for 24v LED bulbs - seems to be quite good: http://www.autobulbsdirect.co.uk/24V-LED-Truck-Bulbs/

 

Goof progress - and I am still 4 weeks away from picking the old girl up :) :) Definitely getting itchy fingers right now...... :)

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Ignore the itchy fingers, it's the bigger biceps you are going to need to get round corners.....

 

Oh - the biceps I remember from the 1970's - and the sore hand from knocking the handbrake off - and the aching leg from standing on the throttle pedal. Haven't got the luxury of the hand throttle our tippers used to have!

Do get the bonus of 6x6 and low ratio though :-) :-)

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I got some magnetic SLOW VEHICLE signs from here a while back - 610mm wide. Quite good value. They also have a 1200 wide version available.

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Slow-Vehicle-Fluorescent-Magnetic-Warning-Sign-/272172432116?hash=item3f5ebdbaf4:m:mkIy-XGAx9PXuIU66J5BM7Q

 

 

Many thanks - got the 1200mm one @ £30 saved on watch on evilbay :-) 25 days to run so should be OK

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Thinking out loud a moment - a dangerous occupation I know - have any other Militant owners considered fitting a Clansman intercom in the cab?? As I recall cab noise was like, or worse, than that in a Stolly whilst driving making normal conversations with the co-driver borderline impossible.

The Militant is 24v so should be OK electrically. If you have done it - how did you go about it - i.e where did you spur off the power supply. If not - is there any reason why not??

 

As I will be stripping things down for repairs etc it seems a good time to think about doing such a thing. :-)

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Thinking out loud a moment - a dangerous occupation I know - have any other Militant owners considered fitting a Clansman intercom in the cab?? As I recall cab noise was like, or worse, than that in a Stolly whilst driving making normal conversations with the co-driver borderline impossible.

The Militant is 24v so should be OK electrically. If you have done it - how did you go about it - i.e where did you spur off the power supply. If not - is there any reason why not??

 

As I will be stripping things down for repairs etc it seems a good time to think about doing such a thing. :-)

 

Never thought to do it, but sounds like a great idea. Any journey longer than 5 minutes on the road and I wear ear defenders to prevent having ringing in my ears in bed that night. They're certainly not the most sociable or even driver friendly cabs. Having used the intercom on 432's whilst driver training, I'd have thought it ideal for the Militant. The batteries are in the cab, so the power feed would be very simple I'd have thought?

 

Jules

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Never thought to do it, but sounds like a great idea. Any journey longer than 5 minutes on the road and I wear ear defenders to prevent having ringing in my ears in bed that night. They're certainly not the most sociable or even driver friendly cabs. Having used the intercom on 432's whilst driver training, I'd have thought it ideal for the Militant. The batteries are in the cab, so the power feed would be very simple I'd have thought?

 

Jules

 

Kind of what I was thinking... :)

Back in the day (early Seventies) we used to wear industrial ear defenders linked by a motorbike intercom because as a transport unit access to Clansman gear of any sort was virtually impossible. As was conversation in the cab inc. map directions from the co-driver

The Stollys could be rigged as FFR so there was a 28v take off point beside the commanders seat on little Maud which was used to power the intercom on her.

Obviously the Militant won't have such a pre-wired take off point and I'd be loath to take a power supply direct from the batteries - if nothing else it means the intercom would be permanently live so any issues would result in dead batteries - and bump starting a knocker is, literally, a non-starter :shocked:

So my thoughts were to have a detailed look at a wiring diagram to see where I could take a switched power supply from. At first glance it might be possible to use the inspection lamp socket on the distribution box to feed the intercom system - all one needs to do is pull the plug on leaving the vehicle - no flat battery!! Failing that - rigging a master isolating switch in the feed circuit of the batteries might be an answer.

I think the standard IB3 + ICB2 set up would suffice - no need for the ANR version. :)

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Neil,

 

Why wouldn't you use ANR kit? The whole point of it was to suppress background noise which is what you are complaining about. The boxes and headsets are easy to find in servicable condition if not in new condition and they are no more expensive than the non ANR ones. Ebay is your friend !

 

David

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Little Maud now has ANR kit (and a PRC352)!

 

IMG_6965aw.jpg

 

Andy

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Getting a bit carried away with the Military abrieviations here. ANR kit? etc looks nice in the pictures, 352 is clansman kit if I remember right, all going over my head a bit.

 

Anyway reality. Militant wiring is simple in the extreme by todays standards so taking a spur off of the mains to power an intercom would be easy. Fitting a master switch across the batteries is a good anti theft device as well.

 

I did try a civvy intercom on the timber tractor, but the unsuppressed noise from the dynamo made it unusable. Given that ear defenders are essential we have resorted to sign language or silence on longer journeys.

 

Assuming the "ANR kit" is pretty much self contained I would suggest the hardest bit would be where to mount it on the back of the cab. Wiring it in would be the least of the worries

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Neil,

 

Why wouldn't you use ANR kit? The whole point of it was to suppress background noise which is what you are complaining about. The boxes and headsets are easy to find in servicable condition if not in new condition and they are no more expensive than the non ANR ones. Ebay is your friend !

 

David

 

I was looking on eBay last night David - the ANR boxes and headsets that I found were between 1.5 and 2x the price of normal one. Cost will be a big factor for me - and I also want to investigate a rear view camera set-up as I know from experience reversing one of these old girls is not a solo job.

 

Little Maud now has ANR kit (and a PRC352)!

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]114207[/ATTACH]

 

Andy

 

Interesting you did that Andy - did you feel the back-gound noise was too much on normal boxes?? Good work on the 352 - is that a TUAAM box in the middle now?? How is the old girl running these days?? I hope she is behaving herself :)

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Getting a bit carried away with the Military abrieviations here. ANR kit? etc looks nice in the pictures, 352 is clansman kit if I remember right, all going over my head a bit.

 

Sorry about the abreviations, Yes ANR stands for active noise reduction. There is a microphone inside each ear cup and if it hears anything that has not come down the intercom, that noise is reversed and fed into the speaker, canceling out the external sound. If you have never experienced it, it is amazingly good. The Clansman ANR boxes have yellow fronts and different headsets are needed (like Racal 195 which are luckily quite common).

 

Fortunately the Clansman intercom function is independent of the radio so as a minimum you need a CB2 (crew box, 2 outlet) and an IB3 (intercom box, 3 possible inputs - this is the 'basic' intercom box and has the amplifier in it for the intercom), one 12pin to 12pin cable to connect them, a power supply 2pin cable to the IB3, and two headsets with pressels (the press to talk switch).

 

The 352 is one of many Clansman radio sets but that is a different subject.

 

David

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CB2 and IB2 will also work - the IB3 is really only useful if you have 3 radios (and loses some of the other features of the IB2). Of course if you have no radios it doesn't really matter ! The IB2 can be used directly with the 321 and 353 radios - the 351/2 need an external interface box called an IBHA to convert an audio socket to harness. There is a good set of wiring diagrams for the IB3/CB2 version at http://www.ferret-fv701.co.uk/intercoms_&_radios.htm and a freely downloadable manual at http://traktoria.org/files/radio/clansman/prc320/Clansman%20harness%20manual.pdf

 

Regards

 

Iain

 

PS Neil - I probably have some gold fronted harness boxes you can have (untested) for cost of postage

Edited by g0ozs
add diagram and manual links

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