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Dingo advise needed

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I work at a local military museum. One of the pieces is a Dingo that a previous volunteer tore apart, and sadly he is now deceased, so the challenge of putting things right again fall on those of us remaining.

 

He had removed pretty much all of the panels under the engine looking for a leak. However, we found the leak to be coming from the bell housing. Of course, now that we have it running, the leak has stopped. The transmission is showing full, or perhaps even a little overfilled. But just in case the leak was from the fluid coupling, I am going to check it's level and top up if necessary.

 

What is the modern day correct oil that goes in the fluid coupling and the transmission?

 

Are the transmission input seal or the fluid coupling seal something special, or just plain seals available at the local jobber?

 

We also had some issues with the starter, in particular wear on the contacts of the solenoid. Are there any sources of parts for these?

 

Thanks in advance for any help you guys can provide.

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The correct oil for the flywheel is OM13; which has a commercial equivalent of an ISO 10 hydraulic fluid. I the UK, I believe that Morris makes a suitable one. The flywheel isn't too sensitive to fluid type though, and plenty of people run them with regular auto trans fluid without problems (something like a DX3). I'm pretty sure that the seals are available as a generic item.

 

If your leak is from the bellhousing, I can almost guarantee that it's the fluid flywheel. Because f the design of the housing, they tend to fill up with a pool of fluid, even from a relatively slow leak, that will then be splashed around everywhere as soon as you run it, making it look like a major disaster. It will then settle down to a slow leak again.

 

I would suggest topping it up with OM13 and possibly adding a bottle of commercial seal conditioner that is rated for automatic transmissions. Then I'd just keep an eye on it to see how much it's leaking. If it's a museum vehicle that doesn't get driven much, like ours, then you might be best to just top it up before use and clean up the mess afterwards, as the amount of work involved in replacing the seals is pretty insane and leaving them sitting around won't do them much good anyway.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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I work at a local military museum. One of the pieces is a Dingo that a previous volunteer tore apart, and sadly he is now deceased, so the challenge of putting things right again fall on those of us remaining.

 

He had removed pretty much all of the panels under the engine looking for a leak. However, we found the leak to be coming from the bell housing. Of course, now that we have it running, the leak has stopped. The transmission is showing full, or perhaps even a little overfilled. But just in case the leak was from the fluid coupling, I am going to check it's level and top up if necessary.

 

What is the modern day correct oil that goes in the fluid coupling and the transmission?

 

Are the transmission input seal or the fluid coupling seal something special, or just plain seals available at the local jobber?

 

We also had some issues with the starter, in particular wear on the contacts of the solenoid. Are there any sources of parts for these?

 

Thanks in advance for any help you guys can provide.

 

The original oil spec for the Dingo flywheel was SAE30 engine oil, as in gearbox as well. Do not use gear oil in the gearbox. The leak could be engine oil as there is not a seal on the rear of the crankshaft and oil passes from reservoir to sump over a period, and with sump being shallow, can show as a leak into bell housing, the colour of the oil leaking should give a clue. Seals for gearbox and flywheel are available of shelf (in UK anyway).

Transfer box oil is SAE50 engine oil.

 

Starter is a common Lucas type used on many cars and trucks of the 40's and 50's.

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Thanks guys. The oil appeared to be engine type oil but with a reddish tinge, so I thought someone may have topped up with dexron at some point. The transmission oil as that tinge to it, and I have not checked the fluid coupling yet.

 

So what is preferable for the fluid coupling: the 30 weight or the ISO10 hydraulic oil?

 

Our vehicle has both the front propeller shafts removed. No doubt they will be hiding in a triwall somewhere. Are they important to help divide the load from the rear gear boxes and shafts, or do they cause more wear by providing the full time four wheel drive on the typically hard surfaces the vehicle will be operated on these days?

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Thanks guys. The oil appeared to be engine type oil but with a reddish tinge, so I thought someone may have topped up with dexron at some point. The transmission oil as that tinge to it, and I have not checked the fluid coupling yet.

 

So what is preferable for the fluid coupling: the 30 weight or the ISO10 hydraulic oil?

 

Our vehicle has both the front propeller shafts removed. No doubt they will be hiding in a triwall somewhere. Are they important to help divide the load from the rear gear boxes and shafts, or do they cause more wear by providing the full time four wheel drive on the typically hard surfaces the vehicle will be operated on these days?

 

If there is any doubt on the type of oil in the gearbox, then drain and refill with SAE30 engine oil. As for flywheel, the ISO10 or nearest equivalent, (ISO12) if it is hard to source. The ISO hydraulic oil grades are in small increments so the difference between 10 and 12 is hardly noticeable.

 

Look at the tyres, if there is any difference in tread depth or circumference between front and rear, this may be why the front shafts have been removed. The Dingo does not suffer too much with wind up as each tyre only has around 0.75 tons on it and a small footprint, so the transmission easily relieves it self, unlike the heavier vehicles such as Ferret, Saracen, etc.

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I would think that running your Dingo without the front prop shafts will possibly make the rear drive line last longer as being a museum vehicle it probably spends more time manoevering than running in a straight line. The extra loads caused by wind up are absent and you are doing a tiny mileage anyway. Don't forget to check the oil in the bevel boxes and tracta joint housings at both front and rear as they are all still going round even without the front prop shafts. I can't remember what grade oils but others will.

 

 

I'm sure you already know but the gear change pedal must not be used as a clutch as the brake bands in the gearbox are designed to be either gripping or not. Letting them slip will wear them very quickly.

 

David

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David

 

I have a reasonable bit of experience with the ferrets, which seems to be applicable to the Dingo. The lineage is quite clear. However, you bring up a good point that I'll have to pass on to any volunteers who want to move the vehicle.

 

I think the Dingo will remain in two wheel drive for the meantime.

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