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Chris_Collins

Morris Tilly late model

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My late father was a plumber and used to make a lot of galvanized iron tanks when I was young. I remember being about six years old when I began helping him by holding the rivet dolly on the inside while he hammered the tin rivets from the outside. As the tanks got higher I had to work off a ladder with each hit almost knocking me off the ladder. Anyway, I still have his old tools which haven't seen any use for many years. Who'd a thought. I supported a piece of railway line in my vice as the anvil for swedging the lap joint.

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Once this seam was finished I lowered my press to its bottom and placed a plate at each end of the tank. It pressed in perfectly. I need to now attach all the external flanges and baffles before permanently attaching the end flanges.

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I got the end flanges, baffles and most fittings off the car tank but I only had one filler inlet flange and that being on the complete Tilly tank. The car being different.

This Tilly I knew had a foreign tank fitted.

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I removed this tank and found it had been modified by blanking off the original filler neck and then fitting an original Tilly neck. Once removed I have a complete set of correct bits for each tank.

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I popped the ends off the body of the tank and firstly riveted and soldered the bottom drain plug flange. Next the fuel line filter and pickup. This has a nut on the inside to tighten up the brass fitting and then soldered on the outside. The baffles were then soldered in and then the fuel filler inlet flange and fuel gauge flange were riveted on and soldered. Lastly the ends were pressed back on and crimped tight and all the seams soldered. Not the neatest of soldering but I am very happy with the end product. Pity it will be slung underneath never to be seen.

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Second tank completed. The ends and baffles on the second were not as good so I put them in the electrolysis bath for a few days. The ends have some fine pin holes in them. I then had them re-zinced at a local electroplaters. Before reassembly I ran some solder over the holes on the inside of the ends and then put it all together. They now only need pressure testing and painting.

 

Chris had painted both rooves and all the timber inserts.

These have been reassembled and the first one installed. Timbers for the spare wheel carrier have been cut and fitted. The timber doesn't bolt down satisfactorily to the roof contour and i am thinking of steaming it to get it to hold its shape. My plan is to crank up my Wiles Cooker to provide the steam and pump it into a piece of pvc pipe. A job for later.

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some time ago I had pieces folded up to form the rear body sides. I had the front and top fold done and the rest I will hand form. Now the roof is on I can start on the rear body. I started by supporting an original side in place to use as a guide for the main timber support. This has been marked out, cut and holes drilled to line up with the cage nuts in the B pillar. This is then placed on the new panel so it can be scribed out and cut to shape.

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Time to finish the side panels.

First they need trimming to shape and folding the edges. I bought a couple of sheets of heavy plywood to use as a former. Placing an original panel to trace the shape I then drill a few holes into the plywood which are shared by both metal sides. The two sheets of plywood were bolted together through those holes and the shape cut out.

 

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One of the plywood sheets was laid inside the metal blank and the shape traced out with appropriate allowance for the folds. That shape was then cut out of the metal blank x 4 and then the two plywood sheets were bolted together with the metal sheet sandwiched in between.

A few clamps were added to secure the edges. I only need these formers to survive long enough to make four panels so they don't need to be too elaborate although I need 30 mm folded over for the wheel arch in a circular pattern which needs a lot of slow tapping and is a significant stretch..

 

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Excellent job! I had to replace the rear arches on a much more modern vehicle recently & wish I'd thought of doing it this way...

 

Kevin

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More inspired work from the House of Neville. "With one set of rear side panels in place with their timber support and the roof all bolted up and in the correct position, I bolted a brace across the two B pillars to keep it all in place and then made up another new timber bulkhead which bolts to the rear of the roof. "

 

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"Using the other set of rear panels allowed me to lay out the timber frame as I cut each piece. A very time consuming excercise with each piece lapped into two others. I also did two sets at once so glad to have that out of the way."

 

 

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A bit more progress of the timber work. The side pieces are all now screwed and glued but not attached to the metal sides yet. The front main cross bearer is complete and joined up to the main pillar supports. The rear main cross bearer is cut to size and clamped in situ to hold the sides up. I am waiting on more timber for the rear tailgate hinge supports and rear floor step. I need that assembled to help get the whole body square before I put the floor boards in and make a tailgate. But before I can do that though I have to rebuild the inner wheel arches.

 

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The inner wheel arches were salvaged from the original sides and sandblasted. On closer in inspection they were too dented and with too many rusted through areas. I could have reused them but considering the rest of the rear body will be all new and straight, these parts would have detracted from the finished look. I have decided to make new ones but after working out how to do it I decided I could re-use the inner panel which was easily straightened. The top panel I removed by grinding away the spot welds of the top panel to preserve the inner panel intact. I new top panel was formed up using angle irons and G clamps and working from my pedestal vice.

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First panel done. Came out quite well.

 

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FANASTIC WORK... being a complete sheet metal novice ...just wondered how did you form the curved lip round each wheel arch without it buckling/rippling as you go round ? Many thanks for any tips.....

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Hello Andy, I'm but the monkey, I'll let the organ grinder comment on this.

 

John?

 

Both sides are now complete with inner guards manufactured and welded in place. I will get them blasted for better paint adhesion. Chris has primed all the timber which has been glued and screwed together ready for fitting. In the meantime I assembled one of the doors.

 

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Any little dents were straightened in the outer skin. It was then a simple matter of cutting the two inner sections were they overlapped and manipulating the lap joint so when welded together and ground down the welds would be flush. The edges were then hammered back over and redressed. I needed several clamps to get the corners tucked in tight to start with.

 

 

 

 

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FANASTIC WORK... being a complete sheet metal novice ...just wondered how did you form the curved lip round each wheel arch without it buckling/rippling as you go round ? Many thanks for any tips.....

 

 

Andy, if you go back to post 135 you will see I cut two pieces of 20mm form ply the desired shape. These were tightly clamped each side of the panel. It is then simply a matter of tapping gently all the way around the circumference just slowly stretching the panel bit by bit. I used a nylon hammer to minimise bruising the sheetmetal. If you hit too hard in any one spot you can over stretch and tear the panel. It is all about taking time to work it slowly. Each guard took about and hour. You can do an awful lot of panel work with pieces of angle iron,flat steel, and a lot of clamps. I find a swivel vice mounted on a pedestal that you can work all around much more versatile than any bench. These methods I find are more accurate and versiitile than folders. Lots of small folds can be done with pliers. Everything then needs finishing off with a panel hammer and dolly. Cold rolled panel steel is very malleable and designed to work like this.

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Andy, if you go back to post 135 you will see I cut two pieces of 20mm form ply the desired shape. These were tightly clamped each side of the panel. It is then simply a matter of tapping gently all the way around the circumference just slowly stretching the panel bit by bit. I used a nylon hammer to minimise bruising the sheetmetal. If you hit too hard in any one spot you can over stretch and tear the panel. It is all about taking time to work it slowly. Each guard took about and hour. You can do an awful lot of panel work with pieces of angle iron,flat steel, and a lot of clamps. I find a swivel vice mounted on a pedestal that you can work all around much more versatile than any bench. These methods I find are more accurate and versiitile than folders. Lots of small folds can be done with pliers. Everything then needs finishing off with a panel hammer and dolly. Cold rolled panel steel is very malleable and designed to work like this.

 

 

Thanks for taking the trouble to reply.....Andy B:thanx:

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It is a real pleasure to follow the outstanding restoration projects on this forum. The levels of skill in metal-bashing, welding, casting, woodwork, painting etc are extraordinary. I am grateful to all of you who both do the work and then photograph and explain what you are doing for the rest of us - truly inspiring. Thank you all.

 

10 68

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I agree; It is a real pleasure to follow this outstanding restoration projects on here. I only wish I had the time and the ability to do the same! You must have had a good 'teacher' if you are not in the auto crash repair business already.

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