Jump to content
Great War truck

1918 Liberty B

Recommended Posts

I have a conundrum for you that has puizzled me for some time. The 'change speed and brake operating bracket' on the leyland S type was significantly modified for use in the c.1912 S3. My chassis, which I believe to be an S2, utilised the earlier version. BUT, I have a perfect and complete example of the S3 'bracket'. Do I use the latter or do I fabricate a copy of the earlier version? Robert

 

Is the situation any different to vehicles of todays era. Part number XXXX is now superseded by part no YYYY. It fits straight on, does the job asked of it and is a genuine product for that vehicle.

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately it doesn't fit straight on... the one I have requires me to drill a large hole central in the side of the chassis for the pivot. Whereas the pivot in the earlier version lies just above the chassis. In addition all the bolt hole locations are slightly different. The later version remained the same for the next ten years or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is your vehicle, Robert, what is your gut instinct?

 

trevor

My instinct is to consider how a scholar might view the vehicle in 100 years time. So mechanically it's almost authentic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unfortunately it doesn't fit straight on... the one I have requires me to drill a large hole central in the side of the chassis for the pivot. Whereas the pivot in the earlier version lies just above the chassis. In addition all the bolt hole locations are slightly different. The later version remained the same for the next ten years or so.

 

I know I said parts should fit correctly. It still is the situation where modification has to occur as the newer part is the now produced part and the older version is no longer available. Different mounts and linkages abound.

 

The other option is a line of the vehicles history, where modification and changes have occurred to keep the vehicle going particularly is used away from a city and a regular supply of parts. The local blacksmith and garage would have

kept the vehicle operational.

In the same line during the early days of The Great War, there was a problem with the rear axle housing on Thornycroft trucks in France. The army engineers in France cast their own version, which was later accepted by Thornycroft and became the standard part.

 

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always found the modifications/upgrades a vintage vehicle acquires over a long life interesting in themselves. For example, an FWD Model B as it was issued in 1917 vs the same model in 1925 with pneumatic tires, electric start, lights, etc.

 

Since you can't run down to the local truck parts store to pick up a new part, certain compromises must often be made on the originality front but I am in awe when I see a restorer who stops at almost nothing to make a truck as close to 100 percent accurate as his time and effort can make it. Just had a tour of a much more modern MV where the owner use ONLY NOS part used at the exact timeframe the restoration was designed to portray. Pedantic? Certainly, but delightfully pedantic... admirably pedantic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand we do have people like Ben and the Gosling's who build parts to original specifications.

In my own situation it is a matter of what parts are available to use, the facilities I have to construct some parts, or the funding to otherwise pay to have these parts built. Each of us will have a different set of criteria to work from to produce an operational vehicle.

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, stunning work.

I didn't realise how long it is, must be fun on a hairpin bend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's why it is so long! To keep a Carthorse in the back to drag it round! :-D Power steering, three Weetabix for breckfast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one has just turned up and sold in Springfield Missouri. Looks very complete and would not take a lot to get it running.

 

How much did it sell for I hear you ask?

 

OeiDVLV.jpg

 

MWPASCZ.jpg

 

5Q0JWIF.jpg

 

MgqUxwI.jpg

 

ZBjojKy.jpg

 

1pafbmp.jpg

 

RGBLXfx.jpg

 

The heady sum of $3,000. Well that's my pension plan scuppered then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Liberty of Ian Morgan has come on some way now. Using many original photos of the wooden body being made we think that Ian and Ari have made a very accurate copy of the original

b6dae507-2906-4dad-994a-36220d3720e1.JPG

FullSizeRender2.jpg

FullSizeRender3.jpg

IMG_0885.JPG

IMG_0886.JPG

IMG_0887.JPG

IMG_4580.PNG

IMG_4607.JPG

IMG_4650.JPG

IMG_4653.JPG

IMG_4682.JPG

IMG_4683.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looked great going up the hill to GDSF. One thing the Liberty was missing and which has just been remedied is the triangular Quartermaster Corps badge on each side of the seat box. 

FullSizeRender.jpg

IMG_0456.JPG

IMG_0457.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...