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WW1 Dennis truck find

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22 hours ago, Rootes75 said:

Its a lovely read seeing this progress.

You are too kind. I am glad you are enjoying it though. It is the only reason for doing it!

Steve  :)

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21 hours ago, andypugh said:

Did you consider that they might be chaplets? 

Pretty sure they are not. They just look like surface marks as if something had been left in the sand. I have seen chaplets and they were much more obviously separate components. Also there is nothing obvious to support just there. I may yet be provem wrong!

Steve  :)

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They are re-decorating our production office at work and I got a call to say they were getting rid of an old picture and would I like it? It turned out to be a framed general arrangement drawing for the Dennis Subsidy A chassis! I took their arms off...

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Steve  :)

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Another photo please, square on

 Doug

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Hi Doug.

This is square on but the reflection is terrible!

Steve  :)DSCN9182.thumb.JPG.b652b60b6c0925332faa22750ba09cfb.JPG

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Very nice and good news that it is with you rather than being put in a skip!

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Yesterday there was an antiques program on tv a couple had a little russian home tabernacle in silver. They had the plan throwing it in the bin, but it got sold for 800 euros... People are stupid.

I did fish the complete construction drawings of our local coal mine from a waste paper stack on the road side.

Edited by Citroman
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Pattern making continues and now I am into core boxes. As you can see, there are two cut-outs in the back with return flanges, necessitating a core box each. The flange requires that the core protrudes outwards to create it.

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This is the side of the box with the flange tucked underneath. I drew out the profile on the drawing board which helped a lot in aligning it all.

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The front and side I glued together as a seperate piece. It must disassemble to be able to release the sand core.

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And the same for the other side.

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The whole lot is held together with over-centre catches. The water overflow boss was glued into the bottom.

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The prints on the main plug and the two boxes. The right hand one has two bosses for water outlets.

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Now onto the big core. I plained up some timber left over from a lorry body and the base is an old table top. Nothing is wasted in this household!

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The filler neck requires a cylindrical boss so I glued up two blocks and screwed them together before drilling the hole.

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The angles on the blocks were all cut on the chop saw. That is a marvellous tool. Nice straight cuts with controllable angles and the ability to trim them accurately to length.

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I cut rebates at the corners and set some plywood over the joints to strengthen them. They proved their worth when I dropped one and suffered no harm!

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A trial lay-out.

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All of the loose parts were then dowelled together and secured with over-centre catches.

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Just to add a bit more challenge, the inside of the tank has a baffle arrangement for the return flow. This puzzled me for a while but is quite straightforward as long as I can get the bits in the right place!

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The main shape of the baffle is screwed onto the bottom board. The interior will be part of the fourth core, supported through the return flow hole.

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All clipped together

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Dismantled and pulled back from the core to aid removal.

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One more core box to do. I shall be glad to see the back of this one. There is saw dust everywhere!

Steve  :)

 

Edited by Old Bill
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I think that the internal baffle is to deflect cold water being poured into an empty radiator from going down the pipe into the heads. Instead it tops up the radiator itself displacing hot water in the radiator into the cylinders via the water pump, hopefully reducing the risk of cracking a cylinder casting with thermal shock.

Nice woodwork too !

David

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11 hours ago, David Herbert said:

I think that the internal baffle is to deflect cold water being poured into an empty radiator from going down the pipe into the heads. Instead it tops up the radiator itself displacing hot water in the radiator into the cylinders via the water pump, hopefully reducing the risk of cracking a cylinder casting with thermal shock.

Nice woodwork too !

David

I very much doubt that it was to prevent cracking, boiling water will still crack an engine! More for better flow in the rad.

 

Matthew

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40 minutes ago, mattinker said:

I very much doubt that it was to prevent cracking, boiling water will still crack an engine!

It was 19-umpteen. A lot of engineering was based on rules of thumb and common beliefs. The baffle might have been intended to address a problem that did not exist, to address a problem that did exist, but ineffectively, or to address a real problem effectively. It is very unlikely that anyone then would have bothered to _test_ which of those it was.

Even now, where a car company might have more test vehicles than a total pre-war production run, a lot of stuff gets put in on the basis of "it probably does no harm" or a quick back-of-the-envelope FE analysis. 

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A thought as to the radiator baffle; When an engine is working very hot there is a danger when checking the water level.  Hot water can splash up through the filler cap opening. The baffle would redirect water reducing this splashing.  A second point could be as an indicator as to how fill a radiator should be. 

A check on two radiators here show no triangular baffle but a circular shaped additional casting positioned vertically  instead.

 Doug

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