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BenHawkins

1914 Dennis Lorry

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I booked Friday afternoon off work and went for a drive to the nearest weigh bridge. It is only one and a half miles from home but gave us the opportunity to try another couple of short moderately steep hills (in the form of canal bridges). The bridges are not steep enough for gradient marker signs but we are gaining confidence to take it further afield.

If does go better in warm weather; I don't know if that is just the oil being thinner in the transmission and wheel bearings.

Anyway, the result was a total mass of 2580kg. 1100kg on the front axle and 1480kg on the hind axle. The petrol tank was half full and there was a supply of oil and tools. Technically it would just go on a car transporter trailer but a serious tow car would be needed.

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Why do british vehicles often have only one headlamp?

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5 minutes ago, Citroman said:

Why do british vehicles often have only one headlamp?

I don't think there was any requirement for headlamps to start with . This one left the factory with only sidelamp brackets but had a headlamp added by the original owner, I don't think my 1908 Dennis ever had any fitted. Period photos often show a single headlamp on early vehicles but most surviving vehicles have now been upgraded to two. Did the subsidy specification require two headlamps?

Thanks for all the positive comments!

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Purely as an anecdote:  An old time truck driver pointed out to me that if you see any photo's of commercial vehicles up to about 1970 they will have one huge spotlight at the front.

Dynamo charging dictated that when the wipers, heater fan and main beam were all in action at the same time the it didn't take long for the engine to start misfiring.

 

Apparently it was common practice just to use the one big spotlamp to save the battery.

 

After the 70's alternators became common and the charging problem didn't arise

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We have just spent a few days in the Cotswolds which included providing transport for the wedding of some good friends.

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Getting the bride to the church on time adds a little stress to the drive.

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But after that trip went so well it was much less concerning to make it to the village social club.

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The cab, doors and windscreen provided ample weather protection as described in the original sales catalogue (40mph winds and rain).

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Back to the venue where the sun came out for the photos.

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The hill performance is slowly improving (and probably my driving also), but there is probably some more tuning to be done. 

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Absolutely lovely

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Have enjoyed the process and the problem solving - the time has passed so quickly...    "...Quite a promising start to the project." ... January 2015.  

 

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