Jump to content
BenHawkins

1914 Dennis Lorry

Recommended Posts

A slot was needed in the bulkhead so I drilled a row of pilot holes.

IMG_4358s.thumb.jpg.b6ed3b9b4943b3ee6509dacc6958e297.jpg

Then drilled them out.

IMG_4359s.thumb.jpg.8d301d15e980af5b0a18f0d30a411c6c.jpg

Finishing off with a file.

IMG_4360s.thumb.jpg.6b472460c5aff0acd958232ac60667a2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After marking up the shaft I cross drilled the shaft (using the milling machine) and reamed out for taper pins.

IMG_4361s.thumb.jpg.849a1143262636610e9edc6ad39aad3a.jpg

Then connected it all up. At some point I will take the transverse shaft mounts off and finish machining them to shape.

IMG_4363s.thumb.jpg.a8dc88161bf2bf79d5b76a00a34fe718.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The throttle was more complicated, needing the pedal and hand control connecting. Also nothing really lines up so it required cranked rods.

IMG_4351s.thumb.jpg.bfcfb51ee30b4886eb798cec77487424.jpg

 

This is achieved with an intermediate lever.

IMG_4354s.thumb.jpg.a2ca331bb3358ee8df59bd9d7de2beab.jpg

 

It took most of the weekend to sort all these linkages out so I was pleased to have it all finished.

IMG_4362s.thumb.jpg.1d1748574d115bc88f47d7c79919e289.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We then decided to try running the engine. It runs for about 30 seconds at a time, which at the moment I have put down to fuel starvation as I only started out with two gallons in the tank.

I hope the video works (despite the poor quality).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Ben! Hows the starting handle arm? Or did it go first time?

Steve :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben, and the lovely Apprentice,

Well done.

I've followed your journey and I'm in awe of your abilities and efforts.

One good thing the engine stopped slowly rather than lock up so low fuel does sound reasonable.

Looking forward to your next instalment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments, it was annoying that I had to fly to Denmark on Monday morning so could not have another go with the engine. At least it gave me plenty of time to rest my starting arm. I got back on Friday evening and we drove straight down to Southampton ready for Beaulieu autojumble.

The in service photo of the lorry shows a large brass mirror on the drivers side; I managed to negotiate this one for a sensible price.

IMG_4370s.thumb.jpg.17916af891ccd5bc7e2d6997c9a4bbaf.jpg

 

I also picked up the Claudel Hobson carburettor jets in case I decide I need to try another size.

IMG_4369s.thumb.jpg.a494035282fe944c99c9137316b279c9.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I only had some of today to work on the lorry. The first job was using a 1/2" bolt to draw the guide bushes into the clutch.

IMG_4365s.thumb.jpg.2f693162cadbe2a62bd15efeb516077d.jpg

 

Then fit the studs to the clutch centre and fit it to the threaded clutch hub bush. A centre punch was used to produce a small indentation at the perimeter of the retaining screw (to hopefully prevent it from coming undone).

IMG_4366s.thumb.jpg.afde18013d5ac4b248926fe1d6372d3a.jpg

Then the clutch was put in place.

IMG_4367s.thumb.jpg.affbde2d5e6bdf79c5517d31279fa772.jpg

I am not sure if the studs should come out far enough that the nuts can be fitted with the springs at their free length. I have used cable ties to compress the springs but need to replace the single nuts with a pair of half nuts. I will have to see how it feels when it is all together, it is a mix of Dennis parts from different vehicles so I may not have it quite right.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We put another gallon of fuel in the tank. The glamorous assistant choked the carb whilst I turned the engine over for a few revolutions. After turning the magneto on it started on the third flick of the handle.

It seems like we nearly have the starting process sorted; I will have to refit the choke to the carb to give me the option of starting it on my own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben... 

Once it's been out and verified as running OK you may want to pass on several info about ring gaps & piston clearances on this to the Goslings...if they haven't resolved the issues their having with the Thornycroft power unit... 

 

(I'm assuming you documented such data...?) 

Edited by flandersflyer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, BenHawkins said:

it is a mix of Dennis parts from different vehicles so I may not have it quite right.

 

How much of the clutch-release shaft do you have? I suspect that there is quite a lot of work in the pull-links etc? (And that these will need to be a non-standard length)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 2:55 PM, andypugh said:

How much of the clutch-release shaft do you have? I suspect that there is quite a lot of work in the pull-links etc? (And that these will need to be a non-standard length)

Thankfully the front propshaft and clutch release came from the Gosling fire pump, but the return spring arrangement was from the rusty remains of another engine. The fire pump had a hand lever for operating the clutch so there was still more work to do.

The first part of the job was to try fitting the propshaft. The gearbox is a few years later and has a longer square on the input shaft. In the last batch of laser cutting I had a spacer cut so the square will not protrude into the universal joint.

IMG_4371s.thumb.jpg.ecc2dc089a3b938b50d57e60e302448f.jpg

I didn't have sufficient hands to manipulate the propshaft into place and take a photo, so here is a photo of it once wrestled into position.

IMG_4372s.thumb.jpg.158672a6e86accd52fe5cd3c1d70f424.jpg

Theses are the correct type of universal joints (according to the parts book) and although a little crude they do allow the travel required for the clutch.

IMG_4372s.thumb.jpg.158672a6e86accd52fe5cd3c1d70f424.jpg

On two sides of the knuckles these phosphor bronze slippers are fitted; these were cleaned up a little more before fitting.

IMG_4375s.thumb.jpg.4ef030b590dd0d5c354270a649757c9f.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once the propshaft was in place I marked up for the brackets that carry the transverse shaft and drilled new holes in the replacement mounting rails.

IMG_4376s.thumb.jpg.69d312716175cbadfd49daa0017bb42c.jpg

 

After checking that the lever I roughed out previously looked plausible I drilled the hole for the shoulder screw and shaped the eye on the milling machine. I made a new threaded rod to suit this pair of original Dennis clevises and fitted some replacement shoulder screws I had made in preparation.

IMG_4378s.thumb.jpg.245de6ed3403dc8ff368b545ce2be0ac.jpg

 

It was then possible to assemble it all and tighten the pinch bolt on the new lever. Without the clutch springs fitted everything seemed to work correctly.

IMG_4379s.thumb.jpg.660bb2e365de6e5efa53207a158faecf.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I then dismantled it all again so I could cross drill the shaft, ream and fit taper pins.

IMG_4380s.thumb.jpg.0e71c0f05ce4b5a8334b19138e00a14b.jpg

I could then reassemble and test it all worked correctly. I looked on the Lee Springs website and found a spring identical to those I had but with two fewer turns (and therefore 1/2" shorter) were available so I decided to buy those as I think they are a better fit.

IMG_4391s.thumb.jpg.e4c650887cbd584021964b2bea3af80e.jpg

That just leaves a problem with the clutch brake; the one I have will hit the return springs if bolted to the vertical face of the rail. The solution may just be an additional bracket to mount it from the top of the rail.

IMG_4392s.thumb.jpg.7bf345138d257883c100fc70e8d455df.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Aster engine has a tapered shaft protruding from the front of the timing case. The Aster engine, although made in Wembley was produced under license to the French designs. It has a 1:10 taper, a cut out for a 3mm x 5mm Woodruff key and an M10 thread to secure it. I roughed out a hub and carefully set the compound slide on the lathe to cut the taper. I then checked it against the engine taper with some engineers blue.  

IMG_4384s.thumb.jpg.c1d817d689b49682a1b728c33be975f9.jpg

I then put it back in the lathe to finish the machining.

IMG_4385s.thumb.jpg.c2b818a538e494f534ae2b6f694996c9.jpg

The flange lines up with the flange of the fan. I should just be able to machine an aluminium pulley to match the profile on the fan and a smaller one to match the water pump.

IMG_4387s.thumb.jpg.cab73de7eba2ceaa08d2e2ef586a3b32.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have made a brass mount of a similar style to that on the brass mirror and the glamorous assistant has given everything a polish.

IMG_4388s.thumb.jpg.0fabd4bb166b0aee302f0b31ba68df3c.jpg

 

I have screwed a piece of timber to the cab to support the triangular floor board on the drivers side. The footbrake linkage was binding very slightly so the return springs would not return it; the glamorous assistant has pushed it down several hundred times until it freed off.  

IMG_4390s.thumb.jpg.42e6e746c0ccb81678f1c96dfb7e78cc.jpg

Numerous other jobs have been completed this week including filling the back axle with oil, packing the gearbox glands and topping up the gearbox oil. The list of jobs is getting quite short and we get an extra day to play tomorrow.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been another very busy (slightly long) week but we are now having a little rest today without any truck work (apart from unloading the lorry and putting it back in the garage early this morning).

The big machining job for this week was to complete the fan pulley. I mounted a large lump of aluminium in the lathe and bored the end out to suit the hub I machined the week before.

IMG_4393s.thumb.jpg.13842d43c511bb77ca04eb63dfc95dc1.jpg

 

Using a pipe centre to help hold it in place I machined the larger pulley and roughed out the outside diameter.

IMG_4394s.thumb.jpg.0603067d1b3a4a86095dc0258d21bf03.jpg

 

After parting it off and turning it around I finished the front face.

IMG_4396s.thumb.jpg.f74582f6864687dd13a44889e0c12c20.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drilled the pulley and hub, and tapped to suit 1/4 BSF bolts. The keyway was cut by using a 3mm wide piece of high speed steel in the lathe after carefully adjusting it to the centre height.

IMG_4398s.thumb.jpg.656feaec8a243ea0bc2c4d51fda4c9bc.jpg 

After I purchased incorrect belts online the glamorous assistant managed to get some v-belts of the correct size from the local spares emporium. There should be sufficient Whittle belt in the garage but it probably needs a weekend of work to get it into a serviceable condition and I will probably always want to carry these modern belts in the tool kit just in case.

IMG_4431s.thumb.jpg.cafe5093a541194154996c19c7b450da.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben, where did this bit of red come from? The belt pulleys seem quite some way out on an unsupported shaft. For a moment I thought that you might have mounted an auxiliary bearing on the fan bracket to give extra support. When you tensioned the belts did the pulley shaft flex at all?

Are we going to see pictures here of the adventure that the lorry had a few days ago!

 

Barry.

pulley shaft.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve very kindly came over on Saturday to show me how to solder the propshaft! We cleaned up the surfaces and applied plenty of Tanacity No 5 flux. We filed small flats along the outside diameters of the universal joints to make sure there was a route for the solder to flow. The relatively short propshaft meant we could carry out the soldering at a sensible working height. Fire bricks were arranged to keep the heat in whilst still giving goo access to the joint. The slight lip on this end was considered to be a suitable lip to accept the silver solder.

IMG_4400s.thumb.jpg.4946f02cdd89ae7a56bb0a0ba2e65fb0.jpg

These fire bricks were given to me when a furnace was dismantled. They are light weight alumina fire bricks and seems fine for this application.

Steve heated and soldered the first end; the heating was more gentle than in my trials. We used Steve's silver solder (CuP 455 I believe) as they were 2.5mm and I only had 1mm & 1.6mm. I was surprised how much difference the rod diameter made for these bigger joints and I will certainly be investing in a pack! 

IMG_4403s.thumb.jpg.476728e77e14262178e054cdd4b5c379.jpg

 

It all went well (the only injury was to the top of the workmate) so I had to take on the other end! Following Steve's advice I filed two notches so there were ledges to accept the solder. 

IMG_4407s.thumb.jpg.b5ffadc18737efe8708b3b993f444f5e.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Asciidv said:

Ben, where did this bit of red come from? The belt pulleys seem quite some way out on an unsupported shaft. For a moment I thought that you might have mounted an auxiliary bearing on the fan bracket to give extra support. When you tensioned the belts did the pulley shaft flex at all?

Are we going to see pictures here of the adventure that the lorry had a few days ago!

 

Barry.

pulley shaft.JPG

I put some primer on the steel pulley hub and that is what can be seen, the larger fan belt is positioned over the 16mm shaft so is minimising the bending moment on the shaft. The smaller pump belt (and presumably the lower power of the two loads) is positioned beyond the end of the shaft. We will need to monitor the pulley and see how we get on.

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We drove the a drive pin in a short way at each end to keep the joints aligned. Obviously they ended up soldered in so I drilled them out.

IMG_4420s.thumb.jpg.575d648dd3d3a2d7284caeb1ef79e586.jpg

 

The holes were then cleaned up again with a 3/8 reamer (I was running short of time so used a battery drill on the hand reamer)

IMG_4421s.thumb.jpg.699027ead8d79e02edaceb77c787088a.jpg

 

With the help of the glamorous assistant we riveted the ends of the pins over to keep them in place.

IMG_4418s.thumb.jpg.71ae8fa73739cc1550fa65c860c6df24.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may remember that I struggled to machine the eyes in one of the universal joints perfectly in line and had left the holes 0.010" undersize to allow for that and any distortion from the silver soldering process. To give me the best chance of getting the two eyes sharing the same axis I had purchased an expanding reamer with pilot from an online auction site. This made the job relatively painless, alternating from one side to the other whilst holding the pilot bush in place.

IMG_4423s.thumb.jpg.04dca7d0b8118d747f26a31505e915ad.jpg

 

Some sockets and M10 rod was used to pull the bushes into the bores. At this point I realised that I had only rough machined the hub to length and it was 0.1" longer than the gap between the bushes.

IMG_4424s.thumb.jpg.924be5ddb35195b8ebb200e5d9939a60.jpg

 

The other end should have just been a simple job of passing a 1-1/8" reamer through the eye. I had a machine reamer in stock but as it was completely parallel I would have been unable to guide it accurately (especially as by this point everything is much too big for setting up in my milling machine).

There was about 10 hours to go until the low loader was arriving so we had to stop and get the lorry presentable (and make a route out of the garage) rather than mess it all up for the sake of not having the right tools in stock.

Once the lorry was on route I had plenty of time to give the propshaft a clean and a coat of primer!

IMG_4430s.thumb.jpg.db04a09400ef4af2d226ba37fb10f631.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was nice to see the lorry out even if we did tow it!

IMG_4426s.thumb.jpg.236dc6f5276781276c074e1d624f616b.jpg

 

The Transport Trust awards were a nice day out, John Dennis brought his 1902 Dennis car along so there was something available if Prince Michael wanted a ride. Thanks John!

The award came with a financial contribution which paid for all the consumables I purchased earlier in the year which is an additional bonus for which I am very grateful.

1762351314_transporttrust.thumb.jpeg.23e4848f6f2c63caf894ee8989332413.jpeg

Mick Giles who had collected together all the major parts for this project was able to attend and it was great to share the recognition with him and both our glamorous assistants!

The trip did show up a couple of things that are too tight as the chassis does twist a fair amount; the bonnet becomes quite difficult to open on uneven ground as does the door!

IMG_4432s.thumb.jpg.b6929f1b409c68d5afe6ee390371cebd.jpg 

Another deadline missed but there will always be another one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...