Jump to content
BenHawkins

1914 Dennis Lorry

Recommended Posts

I found I did not have any suitable screws for fitting the switch so had to move on to something else. It looked like starting the engine was getting closer so some control linkages will be required. The hand levers (for ignition timing and throttle) needed some leather washers to generate some friction so I cut a couple from some scraps I had on the shelf. I looked through the stocks of bell cranks and brackets, decided I was lacking sufficient parts to complete the task and sketched up some blanks for laser cutting.

IMG_4301s.thumb.jpg.c7d86e854849633cdd57865bd2feddbe.jpg

 

The zinc roof is starting to look like the correct shape; I expected it to be a little softer but it should be possible to get it to follow the profile. I don't know how Dennis managed it without ratchet straps and speed clamps.

IMG_4302s.thumb.jpg.3f4daaf27daec4e52266ced3f2a5df96.jpg

 

The doors have been flatted back, rehung and given another coat of paint.

IMG_4303s.thumb.jpg.4d6d413b08f6b4f4328adf0e9adb5324.jpg

And finally the v5 has come through from Swansea so I now have a number to paint on the plates.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I have made up oil pipes for pressure gauges I have always just soft soldered the nipples on and not silver solder like what Ben has just used. On this era of vehicle ( pre-WW1 ) was there a preferred method?

Looking forward to hear the engine start. Engine starts seem to be coming thick and fast now!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben, are you going to use a sheet metal shrinker to take the ripples out of the turned over lip on the roof or do you have some other plan? I have been looking at one of these for years and could never decide whether they are any good or not. Does anyone here have any experiences of using one of these?

shrinker.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Asciidv said:

Ben, are you going to use a sheet metal shrinker to take the ripples out of the turned over lip on the roof or do you have some other plan? I have been looking at one of these for years and could never decide whether they are any good or not. Does anyone here have any experiences of using one of these?

Yes, we have a  stretcher and shrinker set in our workshop. 

They work remarkably well. 

Here is one being used to make a front wing flange for a Dennis N-type. 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/QYtJSq0ZatOqrF8S2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of the hand ones and it does work. The pedal operated ones are worth the extra money as not only can you get extra pressure (or same pressure for longer) but you have got both hands to control the metal. There are also some available with a deeper throat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎16‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 8:12 AM, Asciidv said:

When I have made up oil pipes for pressure gauges I have always just soft soldered the nipples on and not silver solder like what Ben has just used. On this era of vehicle ( pre-WW1 ) was there a preferred method?

Looking forward to hear the engine start. Engine starts seem to be coming thick and fast now!

 

The original oil pipe that came with the engine was silver soldered but the gauge was mounted on the front cylinder block (no bulkhead on the generating set). Soft solder would probably have been fine but more practice at silver soldering does not do any harm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎16‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 1:12 PM, Asciidv said:

Ben, are you going to use a sheet metal shrinker to take the ripples out of the turned over lip on the roof or do you have some other plan? I have been looking at one of these for years and could never decide whether they are any good or not. Does anyone here have any experiences of using one of these?

Before I started shaping the zinc I did expect it to be similar to lead, but it is actually much more difficult to form. It is work hardened so it either needs shrinking; cutting or just hiding under the beading. I am not sure which yet.

This week has been filled with small jobs. The magneto coupling is fitted and the wires run to the switch (now fastened to the bulkhead with 6BA screws. I get sparks with the switch in the ON position and no sparks with it in the OFF position so I consider that a success.

The pieces of timber to fill in either side of the cab have been cut.

IMG_4306s.thumb.jpg.04ed53084d000d12456e750c44f9d061.jpg

And that allowed me to cut the central boards to length.

IMG_4309s.thumb.jpg.d6abde28bf870ac83930ccf97b884351.jpg

All those floor boards have now been primed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have collected my latest batch of laser cutting and welded some of it together to make the pump bracket. The glamorous assistant helped my line this up in front of the engine along with a tacked together fan bracket to check it all looked plausible.

IMG_4307s.thumb.jpg.bafb4cc9fa1b95410c7e6a339a857da3.jpg

 

The infill pieces need bending into shape.

IMG_4311s.thumb.jpg.53fdb3cccc05379bccf3a8f0235dfcc2.jpg

 

I have bored some 2-1/4" diameter EN3 out to 1-1/2" to match the fan; when it is finished it will be welded to the top of the bracket.

IMG_4313s.thumb.jpg.f6e768f9419229e04e9b8b57b73572bd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I unbolted the number plates and took them to work. My employers kindly let me use their printer.

printing.thumb.jpg.c20dae94342df8cb839b5cdbb687ca6d.jpg

 

Then refitted them.

IMG_4312s.thumb.jpg.c68b8e7aae8fce1758782cdb9bdf9f30.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I welded all the pieces of steel together to make the fan bracket. I left the eye at the top a couple of thou under size so I could ream it out until it is a snug fit for the fan.

IMG_4314s.thumb.jpg.63d507ea1f11af695d156bbfd1909fa7.jpg

 

That bit seemed to work.

IMG_4315s.thumb.jpg.b2e5cfaf6642403d5fb66509e88d4ea0.jpg

Then I tried it in position. The fan only clears the chassis rail at the highest point for the eccentric belt adjustment. I am not sure how I got the dimensions wrong but it looks like I need to splice some more steel in. 

IMG_4316s.thumb.jpg.57d0a6845f23d68c36d5281a05101e9f.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, BenHawkins said:

I

Then I tried it in position. The fan only clears the chassis rail at the highest point for the eccentric belt adjustment. I am not sure how I got the dimensions wrong but it looks like I need to splice some more steel in. 

 

Hi Ben,

Can you make spacers up to fit between the mountings at bottom?

regards, Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to go back to messing with the floor boards. I trimmed the three central floor boards, doweled and glued them together and screwed two braces across the underside.

IMG_4317s.thumb.jpg.930f4f142e5b2b11afb44c8f38828f69.jpg

This floor panel needs to be easily removable in order to gain access to the transmission for servicing. To make this possible there always seems to be a flush ring; I had a 2" version on the shelf and the glamorous assistant suggested I could use a hole saw to cut the recess.

IMG_4318s.thumb.jpg.c8b2c629b1f3b921f26ceb862980f92d.jpg

Most of the centre was removed with a flat spade bit of 1-1/4 diameter.

IMG_4319s.thumb.jpg.4ae72c408bef41a2eba601a85246048e.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Richard Farrant said:

Hi Ben,

Can you make spacers up to fit between the mountings at bottom?

regards, Richard

Hi Richard,

They need to be around 1.5" high; it would solve the fan issue but then makes the plumbing for the pump a problem. It should be possible to weld an additional piece of steel in without it looking too bad.

Thanks,

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I then took a chisel to the floor boards to finish cutting the recess.

IMG_4321s.thumb.jpg.5e9f1ea91f0eb121d68cc346970766ba.jpg

Followed by a trial fitting of the flush ring.

IMG_4322s.thumb.jpg.1f9c8da2c9ddec408a8f62ffb14744f6.jpg

The braces were trimmed back using a saw and giving a few degrees of taper.

IMG_4323s.thumb.jpg.51fee71eef1019597a326f3698fc53f0.jpg

And then back to painting.

IMG_4332s.thumb.jpg.44130585b54353216fae2d080a273327.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still need to link up the magneto and carburettor to the controls. One of the things needed is a bell crank for the magneto as the timing adjustment needs an up-down motion but the control rod needs to be fore-aft. I decided to copy this one from my 1908 Dennis.

IMG_4329s.thumb.jpg.59d8d61257f1030b7fcb9261495ea4a4.jpg

The bell-crank was laser cut from 10mm steel; the 3/8" diameter holes can be cut by the laser (as a rule of thumb the minimum hole diameter the laser can cut is equal to the material thickness). However, I wanted the one hole to be 3/16BSF and that is certainly too small for the laser to manage so I marked out and used a centre punch ready for drilling.

IMG_4325s.thumb.jpg.794fb313fe5b3e5c8e145d2a5e6a4698.jpg

Then it was simply a case of drilling and tapping.

IMG_4326s.thumb.jpg.0f2de800adab273f7271a483b3073917.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have welded an extra 1.5" into the fan bracket flattened it off so it is difficult to see the mistake.

355196900_FanBracket2.thumb.JPG.a77720e82986152d26c58aaba372add3.JPG

 

The floor panel has been painted.

IMG_4346s.thumb.jpg.6558583b109123a6e7aa80ab8502e35b.jpg

 

I have welded up the bell crank bracket for the magneto linkage and given it a coat of primer.

IMG_4348s.thumb.jpg.08e343dfbec8a42168c1acc36e24732e.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the roof beading laser cut so it started out with the correct radius. I used a file to break the edges and countersunk the screw holes.

IMG_4333s.thumb.jpg.7d380158663b4c1a96d2494a1744b3b3.jpg

The back of the cab was the best place to start as the zinc was happy to follow the curve.

IMG_4334s.thumb.jpg.47c7e592207f4149ed5b7e384bc425bb.jpg

 

I could not shrink the zinc sheet so cut small notches between the screws to help the zinc follow the shape.

IMG_4335s.thumb.jpg.f9992596ba6bb6cee1a33491b1b37b7b.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I then fitted the straight portion of the sides.

IMG_4336s.thumb.jpg.e654f795566d95e5ded01d02ff7ba296.jpg

 

And working out from the centre at the front I fitted the rest of the screws whilst pushing the zinc to follow the shape. There is a little undulation in the centre front but it looks good from ground level.

IMG_4337s.thumb.jpg.d114e8071aa7b512f0f7f824473f0728.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cut some 3/4" Sapele to length for the top of the seat.

IMG_4338s.thumb.jpg.a6aac51fe15a20dccf8d89bf07a5c49a.jpg

And six short planks for the front of the seat box.

IMG_4339s.thumb.jpg.86529724dbc34f76bed9f9ae748518a9.jpg

The long planks were dowelled together and braced on the underside.

IMG_4340s.thumb.jpg.1600a652205687a9cd236f4ff75de3a1.jpg

An access hatch was cut for the tool compartment. Access to the petrol filler is via a hole that was cut with a hole saw and then rounded off with the router.

IMG_4344s.thumb.jpg.6783f953ddc04a46da64dde9520bc68e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The water pump is 1-1/4" but the radiator plumbing is 1-1/8" so I cut some brass tube to length in order to make the adaptors.

IMG_4341s.thumb.jpg.1dc680641d0c106d193e52161a74c47c.jpg

I bent some copper pipe and soldered some fittings together to link the radiator bottom connection to the pump inlet.

IMG_4342s.thumb.jpg.d2db4fb81a48102de0e46f5abe7fbc60.jpg

 

I then tried putting it all together.

IMG_4343s.thumb.jpg.f48cf9bf67881a330656cc07e33c1632.jpg

There is not much clearance between the fan and the pipe but it should be enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put a gallon of water in the radiator and it started to leak out the lower flange and past one of the bolts. I let it dry out, pushed a little sealant in the gap and around the screw and tightened it all down a little more.

IMG_4345s.thumb.jpg.f618b3b964f09933122f6ddaa82c3cdc.jpg

 

It was a nice warm day so it was easy to tighten the clamps down to stop a couple of minor leaks at the rubber hoses. That just leaves two left; one from a welded boss and the pump gland.

IMG_4347s.thumb.jpg.dbfb4f2898febd8e4293020acee89da3.jpg

The welded boss was the drain plug when the engine was in a generator set; the manifold was up the other way and the radiator was mounted over the flywheel. I think it will take a couple of days to fill the miniature wheelie bin.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Dennis is very bright 'red' in colour. Is this shade original?  Are you likely to get booked for speeding by every passing patrol car?  Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 8:30 AM, Redherring said:

The Dennis is very bright 'red' in colour. Is this shade original?  Are you likely to get booked for speeding by every passing patrol car?  Robert

It is a close match to the paint that was left under various fittings on the chassis, but that may have just been an undercoat. Later vehicles owned by Ernest Shentall were closer to maroon.

I have chiselled out for the hinges on the tool compartment.

IMG_4349s.thumb.jpg.aa02918ec008c67a62e4382889f32437.jpg

The front has now been trimmed back and the whole lot given a coat of paint.

To run the engine I need to be able to connect up the magneto and carburettor to the controls. I sorted out some of the pieces I have salvaged over the years.

IMG_4350s.thumb.jpg.755b12e5b473f91de5f652fd861db9e5.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to make a few extra clevis pins and shoulder screws.

IMG_4352s.thumb.jpg.5599ed2d285005e2c8fe5941659427a6.jpg

The magneto is on the opposite side to the steering column so a transverse shaft is needed. I roughed some blocks to size using the shaper.

IMG_4355s.thumb.jpg.48286c7bd11edc841e8e1f22c1bea730.jpg

Then scribed out for drilling the holes.

IMG_4357s.thumb.jpg.979507b018ca350e0ab3f3a3eea063ce.jpg

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...