Jump to content
R Cubed

NGK Plugs

Recommended Posts

Have any of the bike owners had any issues with NGK plugs failing or causing misfires ect ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have any of the bike owners had any issues with NGK plugs failing or causing misfires ect ?

 

When I had bikes, the NGK was the superior plug, never had problems. You have to be careful to get the correct grade for your engine, that goes with any make of plug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superior plug then but I have my suspisions now having lots of problems with strimmers and chainsaws and mowers not starting or dieing wonce running, fit a different make plug no more problems, and yes the NGK's that were fitted were the correct plugs as stated by the manufacturers....

 

Beware out there if you have an NGK plug which is newish and you are having starting issues or misfires after 10 or so miles try the plug first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to reckon on one or two duff per box of ten but that was back in my two-stroke days. I've always found Champion more reliable.

 

There have been suggestions of counterfeit NGKs on the autojumble circuit over the last few years. I have no idea if the stories are true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I used to reckon on one or two duff per box of ten but that was back in my two-stroke days. I've always found Champion more reliable.

 

.

 

Going back to my apprentice days ... in late 60's. Champions had a percentage of duff plugs. When we were going out on a job with new Champion plugs the mechanics would test them on one of the servicing machines where you could fire the plug under simulated cylinder pressure. One in six might fail and the storemen would tear their hair out when you tried to change them. Champions improved greatly in later years with their "copper core" range which came out to challenge the likewise NGK plugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had issues with NGK plugs in the past, after talking to my local garage I was told they found them more suitable for more modern ignition systems and they did seem to fail more on older points type systems. I use NGK in all my modern bikes no trouble but on the older stuff I tend to use Champion if possible. The NGK plug tends to like a powerful spark often more consistent with CDI units.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had real trouble with NGK plugs in my WOT2 the V8 engine gets very hot, and the NGK plugs just could not cope, changed to some NOS Champions and all was fine !

 

Jules

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This (copied from an NGK web page) may help throw some light on the technicals of hot / cold plugs :coffee:

 

Heat Range Explanation

Typically the heat range for NGK Spark Plugs varies from 2-11. This number indicates the thermal characteristics of a spark plug, or how ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ a spark plug is. The term hot/cold is commonly used to describe whether a spark plug heats up easily (hot) or whether it provides resistance to heating up (cold).

Generally, low power engines such as lawn mowers don’t produce a large amount of heat, hence use a low heat range (or hot) spark plug such as a 4 heat range. This means the spark plug will heat up easily and reach its optimal operating temperature. High performance engines on the other hand produce a large amount of heat, hence a high heat range (or cold) spark plug such as a 10 heat range needs to be used to resist the heat developed by the engine.

Several factors influence the heat range of a spark plug, although typically the insulator nose design provides an indication of the heat range of a spark plug.

When a spark plug absorbs heat produced from combustion, the heat is transferred through the centre electrode and insulator nose to the metal shell, which then transfers the heat into the engine casing and circulating coolant.

sparkplug_tech_005.jpg

A low heat range (or hot) spark plug typically has a long thin insulator nose which will heat up easily however will not dissipate readily to the metal shell (above left). Conversely, a high heat range (or cold) spark plug has a short thick insulator nose which will dissipate heat much easier (above right).

When the heat rating is too high:

 

The spark plug temperature remains too low and causes deposits to build up on the firing end; the deposits offer an electrical leakage path that gives rise to loss of sparks.

 

When the heat rating is too low:

 

The spark plug temperature rises too high and induces abnormal combustion (pre-ignition): this leads to melting of the spark plug electrodes as well as piston seizure and erosion.

 

NGK Spark Plugs pioneered the use of a copper cored electrode in 1958, which enables a spark plug to heat up quickly and also dissipate heat quickly giving an ultra wide heat range. It is essential to use a spark plug that fits a specific engine and its conditions of use.

 

As spark plugs are positioned in the head of an engine, their analysis can give a good indication of how your engine is operating.

sparkplug_tech_006.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the last couple of years I have had all sorts of problems with ignition components of all kinds and in one case had to swap the whole lot of a Bedford ignition system out.

 

The sad fact is that the market is awash with sub-standard and counterfeit items. In the 1970s I never ever ever heard of a rotor arm giving problems, these days it is one of the first places that I look.

 

Spark plugs are the same, and these days I take the view that just because the box says champion or NGK or whatever the reality is likely to be different.

 

There are also numerous accounts of similar counterfeit goods such as oil and air filters, brake components and the like.

 

Sad but true.

 

It is not just the little things either. We had a generating set in Baghdad powered by a CV12. It gave us constant problems and blew turbos once a month almost without fail. In frustration I suggested to our US Airforce maint Sgt that she stop getting the runaround from the contractor (no names no pack drill) and approached Perkins direct. She did, forwarding the spec and the serial number etc.

 

Mmmmm said the nice man from Perkins. Very interesting but sadly we cannot help - as whoever made that engine was not us! Someone out there was doing knock-offs of Perkins CV12 powered generating sets as big as a small house.

 

So no wonder the small bits get copied.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'd agree with Mr Farrant. I've always sworn by (not at) NGK plugs, whereas I've always found issues with Champions, whether on modern or older ignition systems.

 

I think one issue can be counterfeit parts being fed into the supply chain, another issue can be incorrect plug grades due to slight mismatches in manufacturers' ranges or (more typically) catalogue or supplier errors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
….I think one issue can be counterfeit parts being fed into the supply chain, …..

 

This could be a far bigger problem than we realise. I guess the only way to minimise the risk of ending up with counterfeit plugs is to buy them from a trusted source. I get my NGK from a long-established local independent automotive supplier being a main agent for many years for Lucas and others, who I am confident will be sourcing their stock direct from the manufacturers (not that I actually know that for sure….).

 

Given the typical annual expenditure on plugs by each of us, is it really worth buying from an unknown, untraceable source?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My local friendly factor can get NGK's for me far quicker and cheaper than any on line scource. Also close by if any problems. Internet isn't always better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy plugs for the Norton wherever I can find them; I have no reason to suspect any counterfeits.

 

KLGCollection_zpse5c3439e.jpg

 

The trouble is that it's become a hobby in itself....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This could be a far bigger problem than we realise...

 

Oh, it's a massive problem. If counterfeit parts can be fed into the very heavily regulated aircraft supply chain, and to reputable suppliers - and they are - you can bet the automotive supply chain's awash with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once got caught out by a set of fake Ferodo brake shoes. Found out when the brakes locked uo at 70 mph on the M4 motorway near Swindon. Definite stain on the drivers seat! Police and local factor and Ferodo all investigated, none could work out where they entered the supply chain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nothing but trouble when I had a ngk plug in my m20,started from cold everytime but would not tick over and refused to restart once hot ,change to champion l10 and the transformation was incredible ,she ticks over and always (almost) starts

 

Nigel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I could not get Champion plugs for my Dodge I tried NGK and to be honest I was not impressed

with plugs breaking down misfires etcc when mentioning this to a local motor factor rep who called in

at the garage he suggested that I change them and try some Bosh plugs they stocked since then I have

covered over 3,000 miles without a plug change or misfire and I am well impressed

Commander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...