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Jessie The Jeep

RADIATION HAZARD - Take Cover!!!

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I've been collecting old aircraft instruments for form a small diorama to go with my jeep, but one of the things to be careful of is radiation! Many instruments prior to 1950, have the pointers and numbers painted with Radium 226 to make them show in the dark. With a half-life of 1600 years, they are likely to be 'hot' for some time yet!

 

I bought myself a Geiger Counter to check the instruments before use. Some are not much above background radiation, and are considered safe for display so long as the instrument case and glass are intact.

 

I recently read that many American Military vehicles also used Radium on their instrument dials. Has anyone had their vehicle instruments checked or even thought about this potential problem?

 

Steve

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Steve, yes I've also checked my stuff out with a Geiger counter. There was a fuss a few years ago when postwar British Army radios had to have their meters removed before they could be released. Well I checked out some identical meters I had, but only a slight increase. But any wartime meters I've tested, the thing goes into overdrive :shake:

 

I remember a few years ago H&S descended on Bovy to see what risks were on display there, although I don't know what the outcome was.

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During the 1970s and 1980s, glow in the dark stuff was painted with a tritium (radioactive hydrogen3) solution known as trilux. (Hydrogen 3, light: get it?)

 

Items that stick in my mind are:

the Scorpion gunner's Quadrant Fire Control (QFC - a spirit level for levelling then elevating the gun for indirect fire)

Sight Unit Infantry Trilux (SUIT - pronounce zoot), a low-light sight for the SLR

Sight Unit Small Arms Trilux, ditto for SA80.

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Wondered why i got recruited for the new Ready Brek advert!

 

must check my old wristwatches... before my arm falls off!

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Wondered why i got recruited for the new Ready Brek advert!

 

must check my old wristwatches... before my arm falls off!

 

 

I have WW2 wristwatches.

Because I wear them only for events its no problem I guess...

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Back in the late 70's I think it was, while working in army workshops, a check was done on instruments and guages in the vehicles. It would have been at a time when we were awash with AEC Militant Mk1 wagons, amongst loads of other stuff. But I distinctly remember the AEC's because their air pressure guages were found to be radioactive, so a yellow warning label was stuck on the glass, with net result that you could not read what the airbrake pressure was.

 

Richard

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Beware of anything with a greeny yellow paint! Wireless set 62, and others had the main panel marked in this kind of paint. It was very active, and I remember the fuss in the workshop when some scraped the stuff off! Also compass markings etc. One chap was sent for FULL decontam! This included being scrubbed with very hard brushes and lots of water ALL over! Have ALL body cavities cleaned out :shake: :whistle: He was in hospital for some days, and not at all happy :?.

If in doubt, leave it well alone!

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Not forgetting Beryllium used in Clansman Radio's.. nasty stuff :shake:

 

 

 

.

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Not forgetting Beryllium

 

.

 

 

Lee,

 

That reminds me that the Lumenition ignition unit in J60 engines contains Beryllium, the warnings about it were quite scary.

 

Richard

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See the JSP here http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/C05E3C7C-AF55-45BB-831C-09756D9AB9B3/0/JSP392Leaflet26.pdf

It's not that most of this stuff is a problem, until it's inside of you. So no eating, smoking, drinking, cover open wounds, don't inhale dust. Alpha radiation is stopped by one sheet of paper, but once inside of the body is in direct contact with growing tissue. :shake: :schocked: :whistle:

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These J60 electronic ignition modules are safe as long as they aren't damaged or opened up though aren't they? As stated, this type of radiation is stopped by a sheet of paper so the tar-like sealant should be adequate shouldn't it? I've seen these stickers before and wondered how serious it is. (only asking because I'll be re-fitting one of these modules in the next few days :whistle:)

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These J60 electronic ignition modules are safe as long as they aren't damaged or opened up though aren't they?

 

Mike,

 

That is true, our information was that the unit should not be drilled or cut open, otherwise it is safe, who would want to cut one open anyhow, not much you can do with it if it does pack up!

 

Another component for CVR vehicles, with a Beryllium warning on the packaging, was a nodescript metal washer used on one of the wiper arm linkages, for sight or periscope, think it was a sort of shim or wavy washer, but put the fear of God up me when you think how easy it would be to cut yourself on it.

 

Another hazard warning I recollect, was Viton, if it had been in a situation where it was burnt or charred, then handling it could burn your flesh away. Some of the fluid flywheel seals at that time were made with this material and were quite often burnt where they had leaked and overheated. Hope this has not scared too many people, but engineering has more hazards nowadays than you may think!

 

Richard

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Viton "O" rings are found more commonly than one might suspect, particularly where there is contact with solvents and fuels. Amal motorcycle carbs often have viton-tipped float needles (and, of course they never catch light :-))

 

It produces hydrofluoric acid when burned which causes nasty and continuing chemical burns. I would certainly think twice before dismantling a fire-damaged vehicle.

 

We probably shouldn't forget either that most of the NOS brake shoes and pads that we deal with are not asbestos free. They still turn up on ebay but presumably they shouldn't any more.

 

Does anyone happen to know if the old Smiths instruments were originally luminous ? My speedo certainly isn't any more.

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We use Viton seals in fillers for Coca Cola, very good against caustic when cleaning them out. :-D

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We use Viton seals in fillers for Coca Cola, very good against caustic when cleaning them out. :-D

 

 

Coca Cola ?? Is'nt that some kind of derust solution ? :-D

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Coca Cola ?? Is'nt that some kind of derust solution ? :-D

 

 

:goodidea:

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Coca Cola ?? Is'nt that some kind of derust solution ? :-D

 

 

CC worked wonders on freeing up our recent J60 rebuild :tup: (the one that's going to get a radioactive distributor :-o)

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Last year I visited Bovvy on my birthday. After the demo, I bimbled round the back of the Leo that had taken part. I found an interesting metal plate on the back plate instructing me not to paint over the sign or doing anything at all to the paint finish because of the nasties in the finish. I didn't ask: neither did I touch.

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I checked out a few of the groups vehicles at the weekend and found a mix of hot and not gauges.

 

I hope Mr A doesn't want any more kids, as his speedo is hot, and with a cracked glass, is even more dangerous as the paint dust could escape and be breathed in. I also know why Mr M with the Dodge is fairly bald! The other two jeeps are ok, and I havent checked the other vehicles yet!

 

Steve

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During the 1970s and 1980s, glow in the dark stuff was painted with a tritium (radioactive hydrogen3) solution known as trilux. (Hydrogen 3, light: get it?)

 

 

 

 

I wear a tritium watch. Highly effective and the same stuff as the 'Traser' watch that a lot of military guys like - but not to be worn if you are in the field.

 

 

 

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Oh bugger i wear a traser watch and i have done for the past 8 years..........best watch that i have ever had :shake:

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I found an interesting metal plate on the back plate instructing me not to paint over the sign or doing anything at all to the paint finish because of the nasties in the finish. I didn't ask: neither did I touch.

 

German version of CARC?

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