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18 pounder limber

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Modified Limber Wagon for the Irish Army with the use of the Martin Parry Kit. This conversion was different from that of the limbers supplied to the British not having the tool tray or the wheel carrier. Rob................rnixartillery.
How did you get a hold of this. Exactly what I am after for my Irish army gun tractor.

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LBDR, looks like you have found what you wanted. For completeness, following photos of the Australian conversion of the hind ammo wagon into a limber are posted:

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Colour photo of the limber at Fort Lytton Museum. It would have been better if I could have gotten detail of the hook as well as the perch. Next 2 photos from AWM database showing full rig. The fact that the rear door is one piece shows it is a hind ammo wagon conversion. They have had to cut a piece out of the armour flap so that it fits over the later added hook,

 

cheers,

 

DN

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Some more photos of limbers in Australia.

 

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The Birmingham plate is from an Ammo Wagon (hind) that is one of several in one collection. The gun limber in red primer is nearing completion. The limbers 'in the wild' are a small fraction of what was spread along a creek bed - I don't know if they are still there,

 

cheers,

 

DN

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trawling through the Handbooks for 18Pr MkII and II PA (1940), MkIV / V (1931 & 1940), I can offer the following clarification.

 

MkII gun limber for MkII gun (24 rounds) became the Trailer No.4. It was unmodified and was used only for horse.

Mk.III gun limber for Mks IV & V gun (20 rounds) became the Trailer No.5. No sign it was modified for motorised traction.

Mk.II ammo wagon limber for Mks II, IV, V gun (38 rounds) became the Trailer No.6 (horse drawn)

Mk.II ammo wagon limber for Mks II, IV, V gun (38 rounds) was modified to become Trailer No.7

Mk.II ammo wagon limber for Mks II, IV, V gun (38 rounds) was modified to become Trailer No.8. The visible differences between Trailer No.7 and trailer No.8 are not discernible from the manual (no photos, only stores lists).

Mk.II ammo wagon (hind) became Trailer No.9

Mk.II ammo wagon (hind) modified for mechanical traction became Trailer No.10

Mk.II ammo wagon limber for Mks II, IV, V gun (38 rounds) was modified to become Trailer No.29. Again, differences between this and trailers No.7 & No.8 are unknown, but No.29 clearly uses Martin Parry running gear.

 

cheers,

 

DN

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Well spotted Runflat,this clip shows the 18 pdr MkV and the French 75 in Irish Service ,note on the French 75 limber that the ammunition is loaded from both front and rear of the caisson .

I wonder if my 18pdr is one of those ?

 

 

Rob...................rnixartillery.

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Hi Rob, nice 18Pdr! Somewhat inspiring to get my Mk.IV sorted, but Australian Army has done a fine job of deactivating the cradle using C4. :cry:

Any one out there who may have a spare? Unlikely, but you never know.... I have gathered a few trail, barrel and breech spares for these guns so trade may be an option

 

cheers,

 

DN18pr5.jpg

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There is an 18 pounder limber at the National Military Vehicle Museum in Adelaide, South Australia. I'm not sure which variant it is, but it appears to be in very good condition. It currently doesn't have any wheels, but they have just received a grant in order to have some manufactured by a wheel wright.

 

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Cheers,

Terry

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Nice one, Terry!

 

I would say that this is a 'hind' ammunition wagon, as opposed to a limber - judging by the 4 tier rack and central storage box. This thread has taught me something :)

 

trevor

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Actually, reading through the thread again, the 4 rows, double doors and (missing) wooden draw bar make it an ammunition limber, which (had I read it more carefully) is what is stated on the sign taped to the lower door :)

 

Cheers,

Terry

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drawbar metalwork 2 - Copy.jpgIt is indeed the front section of the limbered ammunition wagon. It is in very good condition as most I have seen have rust outs where ever water has pooled in them. It will need the draught pole and the pole support bar as well as the wheels. There are also some leather pouches needed for the door lock keys and the fuze spanners. The draught poles and pole support bars are not too common now but if you have the metalwork, the wheelwright should be able to make them up. Picture shows the end of the pole that fits into the socket in the limber. The long hinges are for the folding draught pole that is stowed under the hind section of the ammo wagon. missing is the reinforcing for the other end of the pole that mounts the 'J' bolt.

cheers,

 

DN

Edited by watercart
add photo

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There is an 18 pounder limber at the National Military Vehicle Museum in Adelaide, South Australia. I'm not sure which variant it is, but it appears to be in very good condition. It currently doesn't have any wheels, but they have just received a grant in order to have some manufactured by a wheel wright.

 

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Cheers,

Terry

Fantastic. I dont suppose you could post up some dimensions. Please!!!

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Fantastic. I dont suppose you could post up some dimensions. Please!!!

 

Sure I can. I'll be going back to the museum on Sunday (I took my Saracen up there for a recent open day and have to do some work on it before I can collect it again) and can take a notepad and tape measure with me. Please post up what dimensions you would like and I'll note them down.

 

Cheers,

Terry

Edited by Starfire

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Sure I can. I'll be going back to the museum on Sunday (I took my Saracen up there for a recent open day and have to do some work on it before I can collect it again) and can take a notepad and tape measure with me. Please post up what dimensions you would like and I'll note them down.

 

Cheers,

Terry

 

Fantastic! the more dimensions the better as I an hoping to make a replica for my Morris Quad. Thanks

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Fantastic! the more dimensions the better as I an hoping to make a replica for my Morris Quad. Thanks

 

I've never made a replica anything, so I don't know what dimensions are critical to you. List out what you want and I'll get those and only those (it can be 2 measurements or 200, but if you don't tell me what you want, I won't get it).

 

Cheers,

Terry

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I read my last post again, and it sounds a bit aggressive. Apologies if you take it that way - it's not intended. I'm happy to take as many measurements as you need but I really don't know what would be of benefit to you, other than basic dimensions. If it'll really help, I can get a new battery for my digital calliper and measure things like rivet diameter and height and metal thickness as well.

 

Happy to take detail photos of anything that you need also.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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Didn't take it that way at all, and I know what you mean, it's hard to know what to measure. Are you a regular visitor, I only ask as it might be easer to divide it up into parts and maybe do some drawings or something.

 

Some overall dimensions would be a good start too. Length, hight and depth of the main box. Distance of the shelves from each other. Sizes of the doors too.

 

By all means take as many pictures as you can, they are always a help.

 

I really appreciate all your help Thanks

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I'm a member of the Military Vehicle Preservation Society of South Australia, the club that runs the museum, and I also manage their website.

 

Lately it seems that I'm always there, but it varies depending on my work schedule.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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I have a spare box from the hind ammo wagon. It is the same size as the box you are looking for, but it has one large rear door instead of the three smaller doors. Also have some of the sub-frame / chassis as well from the hind wagon I am selling off, but I would think it could be modified. It may be worth considering if you are prepared to build from scratch. If you intend building something exact, the number of rivets is pretty intimidating. Send me an email off line if you are interested and I can send some photos - the cost of freight between UK and Australia would be the main problem I think,

 

cheers,

 

DN

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I'm still waiting on a list of measurements that you want.

 

Today I went to the museum to help in filming an interview for the nightly news, and while we were waiting for the reporter, I went into one of the storerooms I've never been in before and found this:

 

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It too is awaiting wheels and other fittings.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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I have no idea what it is. It looked too long to me too. That projectile was bloody heavy.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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We used the 60 Pounder guns here after WW1. If the projectile fits reasonably snugly in the hole and it is 5 inches (127mm) in diameter, then 60 Pounder (Long Tom) is likely. I think one of my photos of the limbers rusting away in the creek bed is one of those.

 

cheers,

 

DN

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I've confirmed that the long limber is for a 60 pounder and also that the "projectile" is in fact a barrel gauge. Apparently, you drop it down the barrel to check the bore.

 

I mentioned to our curator the other day that I need to take some measurements and he pointed out that there is another, unrestored, limber and 2 spare chassis that are surplus to our requirements that could be sold off. I couldn't get decent pictures of most of it, as it is in a large caged trailer in a storage shed, but if anyone is genuinely interested, I'll drag it out and/or climb in to get better pics.

 

The rear door arrangement is different to our Ammunition Limber, so I don't know exactly what variant it is.

 

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