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Not immediately useful, but worth having, I managed to get a spare engine over the winter - it's basically a kit of parts, but will hopefully yields some useful bits. The most useful being a newly re-profiled cam shaft. The current cam shaft is severely warn towards the back of the engine, as it only appears to be lubricated from the front.

IMG_1453.jpg

AEC A193 petrol engine in kit form!

IMG_1390.jpg

Two spare blocks:

IMG_1385.jpg

Also included was a spare carb

IMG_1445.jpg

Spare magneto - this is an earlier type to the one fitted, but will be useful anyway.

IMG_1392.jpg

And spare autovac assembly

IMG_1448.JPG

 

I'll hopefully be able to make more progress over the next few months.

 

Nick

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Not immediately useful, but worth having, I managed to get a spare engine over the winter - it's basically a kit of parts, but will hopefully yields some useful bits. The most useful being a newly re-profiled cam shaft. The current cam shaft is severely warn towards the back of the engine, as it only appears to be lubricated from the front.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102822[/ATTACH]

AEC A193 petrol engine in kit form!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102820[/ATTACH]

Two spare blocks:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102821[/ATTACH]

Also included was a spare carb

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102817[/ATTACH]

Spare magneto - this is an earlier type to the one fitted, but will be useful anyway.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102819[/ATTACH]

And spare autovac assembly

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102818[/ATTACH]

 

I'll hopefully be able to make more progress over the next few months.

 

Nick

 

Hi Nick would you happen to know any one with a spare radiator cap....

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Done a bit more over the winter, but after finishing painting the front of the chassis, the weather hasn't been that good for painting, so not a huge amount of visible progress. So here is a picture of the chassis, once the hubs were also painted.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102816[/ATTACH]

Radiator also coming along nicely - been pressure tested and had a long drill run down each of the tubes to make sure they are clear.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102815[/ATTACH]

Cleaning the sump has revealed a painted number on the bottom - not sure if it's the sump assembly number, as I don't have a parts manual for the petrol engine, and the petrol sump is different to the one fitted to the 7.7 diesel engine.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]102814[/ATTACH]

 

Nick

hiya i see you have a brass aec badge on you rad.thats only the second one i have seen as my timber tractor has one .do you know weather the painted ones are brass underneath??

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Doug, Here is the drawing for the badge, as fitted to Matadors and Marshalls - they should be a matt brass finish. The chrome ones fitted to other AECs are also brass under the chrome. I guess it's easier to paint the radiator and badge in one go, without taking the badge off than it is to take it off! It's only the early ones that are supposed to have badges fitted, but I suppose the radiators got swapped around, so any of them could have ended up with a radiator with a badge on.

 

If you look at the note on the drawing towards the bottom, it says that sheet steel, rejected by the canning industry would also be suitable if properly protected - I've never seen a steel AEC badge.

 

Nick

 

matador.jpg

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I am very suprised that the badge drawing is mostly dimensioned in mm. Was that normal for AEC ? It is interesting too that several dimensions have been left off the drawing (like the width of the border) and the badge is to be "slightly dished". Presumably they came off the press slightly dished and the drawing is just stating that that is ok. It is hard to see why it would be actually intended.

 

David

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23 Aug. 1974 Revision stamp is probably for metrication other than hole dia. Possibly the drawing was issued for manufacture , by then it would be company policy.

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23 Aug. 1974 Revision stamp is probably for metrication other than hole dia. Possibly the drawing was issued for manufacture , by then it would be company policy.

 

The date stamp is when a drawing was copied and issued from the drawing office, someone obviously requested one on that date. If it were a revised drawing it would be written in.

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AEC was metric at one stage but subsequently fell in with SAE standards at some stage. Not sure if it was a war thing or like other British manufacturers well after the war. Certainly Leyland was using bsf etc during the war.

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These badges are of "trophy" value , by 1974 AEC could have re-stocked a dusty shelf or just responed to a restorers request for manufacturing details ?

 

There is mention of raised & sunk portions , so it would probably be acid etched and then enameled - or were they embossed ? I doubt if material was removed on a pantograph engraver from a master but it is a possibility but very costly when they were prepared to go to tinplate.

 

It could be that engravers during WW2 time-line in fact worked metric to make their master for whatever process , and the firm(s) they used made a request ?

 

It looks too clear to be a "print off a print" that tend to have heavy blue clouds , it just looks too crisp and clean around the dimensions to be later amd.

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I'm not sure about etched and enamelled or embossed, the drawing says sheet brass pressing, so I'd guess they were just stamped out from a sheet. I have an identical badge, from brass, that came from an O870, clearly made in a single press operation. I'd guess the 'slight dish to facilitate manufacture' would be to aid release from the press tool.

 

As Richard says, 23 Aug '74 is probably a copy issue date, last amendment looks like the addition of sheet steel as an alternative material on 11.10.43 presumably due to MoS supply concerns?

 

'Background to be sunk' I would guess is indicated because there is no cross section so without that instruction it would not be clear, rather than to show a second operation.

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Hi Nick, such good photos of restoration and progress. Nothing for a while. Moved forward on the rebuild? Love to see some more photos.......

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Just looking in to admire the pictures and see if I can pick up any tips. There's a lot of skill and dedication going in to restoring those timber framed cabs!  

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Not really got any updates that are worthy of posting pictures - lots of little bits have been cleaned up and painted, but restoration has slowed down quite considerably over the last year, mainly due to family commitments.  Hopefully be able to start progressing again in the new year.

Nick

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Not sure I have been paying attention somehow missed this interesting restoration. I have heard of Petrol AEC Matadors my father spoke of an odd one in his unit along with what he called Canadian Matadors meaning FWD Tractor 4 x 4 Medium used alongside Matadors to haule 3.7 AA guns. 

I came across this in a Chilwell list its the only entry mentioning A.E.C petrol Matadors

H.4476112

to

4477582

T.9569

29

A.E.C..

Tractor 4x4 Medium (Petrol)

     

"

30

"

Tractor 4x4 Medium (Oil)

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From what I can work out, there were 17 Matadors from the first contract (V3501) converted to Petrol, but this was done after they were build with diesel engines in, and they were spread over the first batch in a fairly random order.  And then there were a further 147 from contract T9569, which I think were originally built with petrol engines rather than being converted.  And obviously there were a lot of the 854 tankers that were built with petrol engines, although I don't know how many of them there were.

I've been making progress again with my restoration over the last few months, so will post a few pictures shortly.

Nick

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If this is in an earlier post then my apologies, but why were they converted to petrol, a specific purpose? The only thing I can think of is the requirement for one type of fuel, but by that analogy they would all be petrol !

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NICK the records l have on the MATADOR show that chassis numbers 1624 to 1773 from contract T9569  were fitted with the  A193 petrol engine

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I suspect that the petrol engine was fitted in anticipation of using them in arctic conditions because the perception at the time was that petrol engines would be much easier to start than diesels at very low temperatures.

David

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 Matadors were originally modified for the planned Invasion of Norway,... and as in the above post, Petrol engines were thought more suitable for the conditions

Edited by Nick Johns

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As Nick Johns mentioned, the initial 17 Matadors converted to petrol were for the Norwegian campaign, although the campaign was over very quickly, and I have never seen any evidence that any Matadors actually went to Norway.  The other batch of 149 Matadors (I incorrectly said 147 earlier) must have been built for a different reason, and again I have no idea what that was - maybe a single fuel type was a factor for those ones?

Attached is a picture of the A193 petrol engine, which I'm in the process of putting back together, after a period of inactivity with the restoration.  Hopefully I can get it running again in the next few months.

Nick

IMG_3123.JPG

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