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Aden Land Rover radio question

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Can anyone help me work out what radio set would be fitted to this Argyles LandRover in Aden in 67, I thought Larkspur but not sure ?

 

thank you

BrianAden Land Rover.JPG

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Can anyone help me work out what radio set would be fitted to this Argyles LandRover in Aden in 67, I thought Larkspur but not sure ?

 

thank you

Brian[ATTACH=CONFIG]83059[/ATTACH]

 

Hard to tell. It's been a long time. The antenna base looks at first glance to be for a Larkspur HF set (with an earthing strip iirc) though expanding the pic doesn't make it any clearer.

 

The set does not look like a basic C13. I was trained on C13 High Power and C11/R210 as fitted to Saracen ACVs. I really cannot remember what they looked at. Maybe this is one. Or maybe not, because I recall ours were caged away to protect users' fingers from collecting a high-power electric shock from the set.

 

Not much help am I, really?

 

Except that I can believe that in the hands of a competent operator, HF will probably work better over the conditions and distances involved in working in Aden.

 

If this is a C13 High Power or a C11/R210, I'd posit that this LR belongs to a senior officer, either the CO or a Company Commander.

 

Edit:

 

Of course when I look at the picture, there is a BFO number 29 on the spare wheel and I'd bet a good wodge this is B Coy Commander, callsign 29, as I used myself in 1977 when I drove B Sqn leader.

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Hard to tell. It's been a long time. The antenna base looks at first glance to be for a Larkspur HF set (with an earthing strip iirc) though expanding the pic doesn't make it any clearer.

 

The set does not look like a basic C13. I was trained on C13 High Power and C11/R210 as fitted to Saracen ACVs. I really cannot remember what they looked at. Maybe this is one. Or maybe not, because I recall ours were caged away to protect users' fingers from collecting a high-power electric shock from the set.

 

Not much help am I, really?

 

Except that I can believe that in the hands of a competent operator, HF will probably work better over the conditions and distances involved in working in Aden.

 

If this is a C13 High Power or a C11/R210, I'd posit that this LR belongs to a senior officer, either the CO or a Company Commander.

 

Edit:

 

Of course when I look at the picture, there is a BFO number 29 on the spare wheel and I'd bet a good wodge this is B Coy Commander, callsign 29, as I used myself in 1977 when I drove B Sqn leader.[/quote

 

 

Thanks for your help, Yes it is the B company C.O. vehicle :) , any photos would be much appreciated .

 

cheers Brian

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Thanks for your help, Yes it is the B company C.O. vehicle :)

 

OC B Coy.

 

CO is the Commanding Officer, a Lieutenant Colonel, which rank was an appointment until the 19th Century, he being the officer in command of the regiment in lieu of the Colonel, the man who raised the regiment, who might be any rank or not military at all. For instance 15th Light Dragoons were raised by Maj General Sir George Augustus Eliot (and known as Eliot's Light Horse). Hence Lieutenant Colonel, "taking the place of the Colonel".

 

Apart from command of a brigade, not surprisingly in the rank of Brigadier and known as The Brigadier (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigadier_Lethbridge-Stewart), anything above Commanding Officer tends to be General Officer Commanding, for example GOC 1 Armd Div.

 

And every officer in command of anything smaller than a regiment (infantry battalion) is for example the Officer Commanding B Company (though in the cavalry, where squadron equates to company, he is known as the Squadron Leader, whence cometh the RAF rank).

 

If he is an NCO, he will be known as, for example, the NCO IC Marching Reliefs, the 2IC (usually Lance Corporal) to the Guard Commander, who controls the relief of the sentries on the gate and on the prowl overnight.

 

Yes it's a mess but when you live with it, you learn it.

 

There is a fuller explanation in Mallinson's "1914 Fight The Good Fight" but it's a tome and the middle section makes for some heavy reading.

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The size and shape and the presence of one large and one small junction box on top suggest VHF wireless sets C42 or C45 - see large clear drawing 1/2 way down the page at http://remlr.com/wireless/larx/Links.htm and photos at http://www.vk2bv.org/museum/c42.htm. The wing box is also consistent with Larkspur VHF

 

Hope this helps

 

Iain

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