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DO 17 raising

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That's a later version than that used in the Battle of Britain.

I could be wrong but I don't think there are any flying wartime German bombers are there? The He 111s that fly are Spanish versions with Merlins IIRC.

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I don't believe there are any CASA versions of the Heinkel 111 flying any more. The Confederate Air Force example crashed a few years ago following engine trouble, sadly killing the crew. I don't think there are any others that are airworthy or close to being airworthy.

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The headline in today's Evening Standard made me giggle: For you the water's over!

 

Best wishes to all involved.

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So with all this excitement....

 

Does that mean that this WW2 Dutch captioned photo postcard is worth a lot of $$$ now?:-D

 

 

 

Older model, it's a Dornier 17Z that's just been raised.

do2175.jpg

 

After conservation, it'll probably look a bit like the Ju87 in Sinsheim.

10565_10151631011243984_931709903_n.jpg

Pulled out of the Med.

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I was at Cosford on a course the other week and some of the guys in the article were in the hangar (At that desk) doing some work on small parts. It mainly involved chipping off the dissolved ally parts to reveal the steel parts preserved inside, unfortunately the ally shell was obviously once a component part. I didn't realise the one of the guys was the chairman as I asked him if I could go and take some measurements of the display .303 Browning. Its amazing what you can get away with in uniform, one security guy practically dragged me over the little barrier so I could get a good look at the BSA 350 on display.

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almost  six years since this happened is everbody convinced this was a worthwhile project or an absolute waste of hard earned publicly donated cash 

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7 hours ago, cosrec said:

almost  six years since this happened is everbody convinced this was a worthwhile project or an absolute waste of hard earned publicly donated cash 

It is the only example of the Do 17 known to exist. Of course it was (and is) a worthwhile project.

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You can’t save everything, but if you think that the money and manpower spent so far could have better helped to put some wings on the Hampden, Brigand, Wallace and Southampton fuselages, or contributed towards the (admittedly private) Whitley and Stirling projects, then yes why spend so much on the recovery and attempted stabilisation of flaking and fizzing aluminium. 

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Yes it was worth it. OK, so it's in quite poor condition, but it is the very last example. How many more times in history are we just going to scrap the last example of something because at the time, we feel it is worthless.  Worth every penny to save a unique piece of German and English history.

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46 minutes ago, Jessie The Jeep said:

Yes it was worth it. OK, so it's in quite poor condition, but it is the very last example. How many more times in history are we just going to scrap the last example of something because at the time, we feel it is worthless.  Worth every penny to save a unique piece of German and English history.

I couldn't agree with you more. 

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Different people have different ideas. Some may ask why anyone would spend money on a relic when there’s people starving in the world. I donate to a few different charities and all I know is, the money is spent on what the board decide is appropriate at the time.

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3 hours ago, simon king said:

You can’t save everything, but if you think that the money and manpower spent so far could have better helped to put some wings on the Hampden, Brigand, Wallace and Southampton fuselages, or contributed towards the (admittedly private) Whitley and Stirling projects, then yes why spend so much on the recovery and attempted stabilisation of flaking and fizzing aluminium. 

The point is that the existing partial examples of the Hampden, Brigand, Wallace etc. are not under threat; whatever components they lack can be added in the future as and when resources permit, whereas the Dornier would not have had a future if it had been left where it was. At risk of repetition, this is the last example of a highly historically significant type. That is what justifies the effort and expense of its recovery and conservation.

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