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Folding canvas buckets

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Well that forum explains that (and many other things too). It seems I am taking this argument where some people have been before.

 

A contributor to the G does state that the canvas buckets were issued to some truck companies, so it does seem quite plausible that they were isssued to Jeeps as well. However the write does also state a passage from a TM where the canvas buckets do have to be properly stowed.

 

It would seem quite logical that the driving of Jeeps off road will cause canvas buckets suspended from the tow hook to be damaged due to flying objects and abrasion with the ground. it could even cause them to be ripped off. The example of a modern Law Enforcement Officer stopping a Jeep with a full bucket suspended on tow hitch may well have been something that mirrored something that happened 60 years ago. You never know.

 

As for the other matter about suspended buckets, well we will probably never know the truth. I did see an MP reenactor with a Bedford MW a few years back. I approached him with a friendly smile to ask him if he had any knowledge of the suspended bucket conotations. As i got within three feet of him i saw his suspended bucket dangling from his tow hitch. I then felt that the subject matter would be inappropriate for this situation and took a close look at the Austin parked beside him.

 

Anyway. Thats enough on this subject. Who wants to talk about the connotations of slipping a canvas cover over the head of your Jeep shovel?

 

Tim (too)

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QUOTE "Who wants to talk about the connotations of slipping a canvas cover over the head of your Jeep shovel? "

 

 

I'm strictly a no cover man myself!! :D

 

Tim(1)Goldbergstein :lol:

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I've got a great picture of a Dodge ( Jack you listening ) at beltring 2005. No less that 4 water buckets, is that desperate ot what!

 

Richard you seem to be up on these things.

 

I'll see if I can find it.

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Really not sure what Great War Truck is going to make of the boys of the 1st Panzer Regiment, Gruppe Guderian.

 

 

1st-panzer-regiment-gruppe-guderian-june-40_large.jpg

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I think the provocative pose by the tank commander says it all!

 

Actually, the galvanised metal bucket does seem to feature quite regularly on German trucks (and also some WW1 American trucks). I am not aware of any German military regulations concerning the dangling of buckets. Anyway, stones bouncing off of metal buckets will just make a lot of noise and would be unlikley to damage them.

 

Now, see if you can find a picture of a folding metal bucket. I will find a picture of a WW1 American truck with a metal bucket.

 

Tim (too)

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I've got a collapsable water bucket with my Dodge too but I don't think if I'll hang it from the tow hitch again :)

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I think the provocative pose by the tank commander says it all!

 

Quite. For those of you who own British A vehicles, it is worth bearing in mind that the Royal Armoured Corps has / had very strong feelings about provocative poses like this. Namely DON'T.

 

The CO of 4RTR, interviewing me about the prospect of becoming an RAC officer (I didn't - failed RCB), informed me that in the then recent Yom Kippur War, Israel's biggest casualty count came from sniped tank commanders.

 

Furthermore, with only your head exposed, it is possible to survive rolling the vehicle. A friend of mine rolled a Fox on the driver training area in Tidworth in 1976. Driver and commander both got head inside. Gunner tried to climb out as it rolled and was cut in half.

 

And with only your head exposed, you can read a map INSIDE the turret: map outside the turret is like a giant neon arrow to marauding FGAs overhead.

 

Provocative poses like this are for amateurs, infantry and sprogs, but definitely NOT for professionals.

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Provocative poses like this are for amateurs, infantry and sprogs, but definitely NOT for professionals.

 

I bet,

the B.E.F of 1939,

the Russians up to 1942,

the French army of 1939,

the Polish army of 1939 and many other fighting forces in the early days of WW2 had similar feelings but soon learnt the lesson`s of complacentcy, in recognising the true professonalism of the German army.

Ashley

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Though once again a metal version on the side of a halftrack

Ashley

 

 

DSCF0208.jpg

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sorry alll hopefully this shows the officer version :lol:

Ashley

 

 

DSCF0207.jpg

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Provocative poses like this are for amateurs, infantry and sprogs, but definitely NOT for professionals.

 

I bet,

the B.E.F of 1939,

the Russians up to 1942,

the French army of 1939,

the Polish army of 1939 and many other fighting forces in the early days of WW2 had similar feelings but soon learnt the lesson`s of complacentcy, in recognising the true professonalism of the German army.

Ashley

 

Well, it was beginners luck. In addition we must not forget that the Germans had by this stage mastered the art of manufacturing the galvanised triple banded heavy duty reinforced steel bucket with full channel handle. What chance did the allies have against this when they best they could come up with was made out of canvas with a rope handle?

 

I feel that the Germans finally had the tide turn against them in 1943 when Seargent Yuzuko of the 1st Russian Guards Tank Division developed the art of manufacturing welded Titanium buckets. The Germans could not produce a comparable bucket with their limited resources. And the rest is history.

 

Incidentally, here is a picture of a WW1 US Army Nash Quad mobile welding shop (really!) with a canvas bucket hanging over the lamp.

 

Nash6a.jpg[/img]

 

The question still remains after all these postings and an incredible number of hits. Has anyone seen a real picture of a British MV with a canvas bucket hanging from the tow hitch?

 

Tim (too)

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The technological advancements driven by the necessities of war ....fantastic. Full channel handle...remarkable.

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WOULD LOOK GOOD ON THE TOW HITCH OF YOUR BRITISH AIRBORNE JEEP

 

:lol:

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Well GWT I claim the reward, Its OFFICIAL, its on E-Bay so it must be true:

 

No i disagree. This is a plainly updated version of the "French lessons available, knock three times and ask for Lulu" method of attracting clients sign that we used to see so often down by the docks. Canvas buckets were never hung from tow hitches of British vehicles unless you were advertizing for something. Go on someone prove me wrong. The prize is still available for the winner.

 

Tim (too)

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Guest matt

And the scary thing is she's only 22! THAT'S what 40 a day will do for you :shock: !.

 

Matt.

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Is this a pic of the prize or a certain moderator in drag :shock: :lol:

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