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handy1882

Vulcan VSW 30cwt 6x4.

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They made them to last ... I'll bet if you were that way inclined you could have changed the oil, put a coat of paint on the outside, and just run it.

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Great set of pics and congrats on your progress. Having been there and done "that" one can appreciate the effort that the Goslings and other forum members have and are putting in to various restorations before they are lost etc. Be a proud moment when you 'kick it in the proverbial' and drive it out of the shed so to speak! Cheers Rod

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I quite agree that there should not be any need to heat treat piano wire as it comes ready treated from the factory.

However I tried a few unsuccessful attempts to cold form the spring, but as it was 4mm piano wire it was not too keen to stay in the correct shape without trying to tear my face off when I released the tension.

 

Ah, yes, it all makes sense now.

 

I wound some 1/4" springs last year, but there was no way to do those by hand without being maimed, so I improvised:

 

 

When I bought the milling machine I was sure I would never use the 45rpm speed.

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Gordon, I think you're probably right! Apart from the leather seals in the axles everything else has been fairly serviceable so far.... Let's hope the other axle is as good!

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Rod,

 

Thank you for your comment, it is a lot of effort to restore these old trucks but will be worth every moment when I kick it in the proverbials as you say, and take her for a test drive, really looking forward to that day but I think I'm a little way off that though!

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Andy,

 

Very interesting clip, did you get much expansion when you took the spring off the mandrel?

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Andy,

 

Very interesting clip, did you get much expansion when you took the spring off the mandrel?

 

Yes, a fair bit. I basically made a spring, worked out how much bigger it was than I wanted, then turned down the mandrel to compensate.

 

The final springs are here:

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/u7-LoyIMofVXAlpzdUO_z9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

 

The mandrel included an attempt to form the bottom loop, as the springs are a funny-shaped motorcycle seat spring.

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The rear axle has been progressing well.

 

The hub nuts and hubs came of quite easily as they were still well oiled up.

 

E3C7496F-EAA9-4AA1-BBBB-1C5401061292_zps1jisbjxa.jpg

 

 

This revealed some nice hardly worn bearings, a screwback oil seal and the remains of a leather washer dust seal.

 

F7E10EA0-D0A2-4D8C-A869-D76A25766974_zpsakiemrn0.jpg

 

The brake shoe pins were seized but a lot of heat and wd40 got them moving. The brake actuating shafts got the same treatment and came out with a bit of persuasion. The main brake bracket/hub casting was not so willing to come off...

 

04B5FD85-D766-4615-8B60-1313CF68F456_zpscrmrmipq.jpg

 

They are held in place with two 9/16" bolts which came out with out too much fuss and two 1/4" x 3" long keys.

They also seem to be a press fit and were not keen to come off, putting it mildly....:shocked:

I could not find any bearing pullers which would fit and grip on anything substantial, so we made a set using some 1" plate, big G-clamps and 16mm screwed rod....

 

 

BC9AF4E5-9ACD-4B28-A735-524FE12B6D20_zpswohfqt9g.jpg

 

 

After a big fight involving a lot of heating, oiling, tapping and bending of 1" plate, they eventually came off.

 

364C66A1-7804-4D56-A6AE-8B89CE43B658_zpsqenzmoxe.jpg

 

Much excited jumping up and down and a trip to the fridge for a beer!

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With the castings removed the axle mounts and bump stops could be taken off, everything was cleaned up and coated with primer, then the spray gun came out..

All the rear suspension and back axle is now in a nice coat of deep bronze green.

 

348EE8D5-A0F8-4F64-881D-A27E29EEC374_zps9de4shag.jpg

 

9FC62C84-FC8E-4604-BBC5-5A487AA88A81_zpsajqhzcr1.jpg

 

5319020B-6961-4DB1-8454-F96D2369BA1A_zpsdwhg1usg.jpg

 

 

007618F2-310E-4B13-B990-C8C7F97379FE_zps3ajnoynj.jpg

 

 

D5E92DEC-44A1-40B9-AAB6-FD1B6803F778_zpsslu5qzgh.jpg

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Thanks Greg,

 

It looks like the holes for the retaining screws were drilled and tapped in place, so the burrs on the edges of the holes were holding on too.

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Well, santa was extra good to me this year!

 

A simple thank you does not seem enough and the photos certainly do not do justice to the sheer amount and quality of work involved.

 

My Dad Jim has fabricated a radiator top tank from scratch! A huge surprise, I had no idea he was building it.

 

 

 

SAM_0988_zps3awnzp4r.jpg

 

 

 

SAM_0987_zpsyumpcdfm.jpg

 

 

 

SAM_0981_zpsp8uhm4ov.jpg

 

SAM_0995_zpsoiuve4jr.jpg

 

SAM_0997_zps88rx6d49.jpg

 

With the rad cap in place

 

SAM_0989_zpst7bfhez7.jpg

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Just for comparison, this is an original radiator from Bob Grundy's Vulcan which provided the measurements.

 

DSCF1250.jpg

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My Dad Jim has fabricated a radiator top tank from scratch!

 

Wow!

 

I had never previously considered the idea of putting myself up for adoption :-)

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That really is a superb bit of work!

 

Could you get your Dad to explain how he did it? You mention that it was fabricated - so does that mean that it was not a casting to commence with? And how did he obtain that marvellous finish on it?

 

Tony

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Thank you to everyone for your kind comments. Dad has a look on here occasionally so im sure he will see them, and i will certainly pass them on if he hasn't already.

 

Tony, I have some pictures he took while he was making it, I will get them in to some sort of order and try to do an explanation.

There was no casting involved, it was all made in sections and welded together.

He used some enlarged photo's and measurements from Bob Grundy's Vulcan to get the correct size and shape.

As for the finish, it was all filed to shape by hand then polished with emery paper and scotchbrite then finished off with brasso.

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As promised, I've been through dads pictures and will try to expain how it was done,I cant take any credit for the work at all, this was all Dad.

 

I'll start with the name badge.

The dimentions all came from an original badge and a photocopy of a head on photograph which was blown up to full size.

The letters were then transfered to some aluminium sheet and all sawn and filed out individually.

 

IMG_0273_zpskbds8uei.jpg

 

 

The back plate was also marked out silmilarly, but dad said he "cheated" and got a CNC mill to machine out the pocket.... i think i'll let him off!

 

IMG_0267_zpshcsn5klf.jpg

 

 

The letters were then riveted on using aluminium of the same grade so that when it was polished up they would not show.

 

IMG_0274_zpsthb5qwjk.jpg

 

 

The badge was then polished up and looks very nice indeed!

 

 

IMG_0277_zpskcr88asy.jpg

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Thank you to everyone for your kind comments. Dad has a look on here occasionally so im sure he will see them, and i will certainly pass them on if he hasn't already.

 

Tony, I have some pictures he took while he was making it, I will get them in to some sort of order and try to do an explanation.

There was no casting involved, it was all made in sections and welded together.

He used some enlarged photo's and measurements from Bob Grundy's Vulcan to get the correct size and shape.

As for the finish, it was all filed to shape by hand then polished with emery paper and scotchbrite then finished off with brasso.

 

Rob - that really is an amazing job! We have enough trouble welding steel as we are not Welders but welding aluminium for that wonderful job is an amazing feat! I patched up the Top Tank of the Dennis Radiator but another enthusiast told me at the time that I was wasting my time as it never lasts - and Steve told me only this morning that it was looking very sorry for itself again. He hopes to patch it up for one more season but it will need new tanks - they will have to be castings as there is no way that we can emulate your father's work!

 

Perhaps one of your pictures will show the welds inside the tank?

 

Tony

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