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British army uniform WW2

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White-enamelled mugs prevailed throughout WW2 (and beyond).....the brown-colour version was introduced around 1944-45 as part of the new tropical clothing & equipment issue (alongside aluminium soap tins, incidentally).....it is doubtful if any brown-mugs actually saw service, at least in Europe, before the end of the war although they did become commonplace during the post-war years.....

 

The waterbottle was indeed originally intended to be carried in the small pack, but in reality the volume of kit carried by the average soldier resulted in this rarely occuring......

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Thanks, that is an excellent reference. I found the (what have referred to inmy previous post as) types 2 & 3 on that page, but the type 1 remains a bit of a mystery. It is nearly identical to the Pat. 1919 waterbottle carrier, but the straps from the buckles to the front cross piece are shorter on mine than the one depicted on the website (http://www.karkeeweb.com/patterns/1919/1919_equipment_carriers.html). I guess it is either a version of the P19 or an early production P37.

 

Incidentally, anyone know if all P37 water bottle are WW2 produced, or how to date these?

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

 

These are in my other book, the bottle that is on its own is WW1 08 issue the other one with two pictured are obviously WW2. Any good?

P1040645.jpg

P1040647.jpg

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These are in my other book, the bottle that is on its own is WW1 08 issue the other one with two pictured are obviously WW2. Any good?

 

Thanks! Two of my bottles have the same carriers as in your second pic. The first one is a bit different though of the WW1 one in your first pic, in that the straps from the cross to the buckles are shorter on mine. See the pics below:

 

Edit: I just noticed the press stud is marked 'United Carr Canada'.

 

waterbottle001.jpg

 

waterbottle002.jpg

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

Edited by earlymb

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OK, I think I have an ID on that water bottle carrier. It may be Canadian-made for Australia. Although there are a couple of them on eBay.au they can't be very common here. I pulled it from a knee-high .50p-each-pile of skeleton carriers at Beltring 2011. I am quite pleased with it as it is perfect for an impression I'm working on.

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

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The collection in the photo's is very good indeed.

 

Lot's of people saying where you've got it wrong but i'd say (depending on fine tuning for the exact theatre/period) it's spot on. Don't worry.

 

White mugs are fine for any period. Lot's of photographic evidence of brown mugs in europe post d-day, Unlike the aluminium soap dish and steel mirror they are NOT part of the late war kit for the Pacific theatre. A new water bottle with mug was part of the 1944 pattern kit for that.

 

Drivers did NOT have rubber soled boots. They had leather sold ammo boots like everyone else. Some Commando's had rubber soled boots but they were/are very rare indeed.

 

Bren pouches were worn from the very beginning of '37 webbing by the infantry. The smaller cartridge carriers are for rifle-carrying non-infantry personnel, nothing to do with early/late.

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Very true, ammo boots/leather soles, with heel/toe plates and dependant on year maybe studs in differing number and pattern.

 

Drivers tended to be issues cartridge carriers, as stated. (ever tried to drive a bedford with normal sized fixed pouches ??...............and yes, there are 'MT pouches' out there, but very little real evidence of them being used/issued.- difference is instead of fixed 'hooks' into belt, they used a tunnel that would slide along belt,)

 

 

 

The collection in the photo's is very good indeed.

 

Lot's of people saying where you've got it wrong but i'd say (depending on fine tuning for the exact theatre/period) it's spot on. Don't worry.

 

White mugs are fine for any period. Lot's of photographic evidence of brown mugs in europe post d-day, Unlike the aluminium soap dish and steel mirror they are NOT part of the late war kit for the Pacific theatre. A new water bottle with mug was part of the 1944 pattern kit for that.

 

Drivers did NOT have rubber soled boots. They had leather sold ammo boots like everyone else. Some Commando's had rubber soled boots but they were/are very rare indeed.

 

Bren pouches were worn from the very beginning of '37 webbing by the infantry. The smaller cartridge carriers are for rifle-carrying non-infantry personnel, nothing to do with early/late.

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