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BIGREDONE

British army uniform WW2

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I thought I would post some pictures of the kit I have been collecting over the past few months for my new Royal Engineers impression. I will start with the basic kit and uniform. The uniform is repro but most of the rest is original.

 

I hope this will help anyone who is just starting out.

 

I will also post the basic uniform and kit for the US infantry man in due course.

 

I am not an expert on uniforms so please feel free to correct me if I am in error.

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Mug should be the red/brown version! :nono: Wandering about with a big WHITE target on your back? :shocked:

Drivers had rubber soles on the boots, not nails.

The SMLE No 1 was used mostly in the Desert and Far East, though there are photos of units armed with No1 in Europe post D-Day.

Edited by Tony B

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Thanks for the reply.

 

Mug should be the red/brown version! :nono: Wandering about with a big WHITE target on your back? :shocked:

 

Were white mugs ever issued then as I was under the impression they were used early war?

 

Drivers had rubber soles on the boots, not nails.

 

Would that be rubber or leather?

The SMLE No 1 was used mostly in the Desert and Far East, though there are photos of units armed with No1 in Europe post D-Day.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for the reply.

 

 

White mugs were used pre-war, in 1 pint and 1/2 pint sizes, later they issued dark brown ones, so not wrong if early war time is depicted.

 

A good reference book that quotes Army Council Instuctions (A.C.I.) on uniforms, badges and personal kit of the British soldier in WW2 is "British Army Uniforms & Insignia of World War Two" by Brian L. Davis ISBN 0-85368-609-2

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Drivers had rubber soles on the boots, not nails.

 

 

I have come across a pair of 1944 boots with Rubber soles but not on the heels. Also, drivers tended to remove the rear buckles on the belts as they get caught in the seat backs.

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White mugs were used pre-war, in 1 pint and 1/2 pint sizes, later they issued dark brown ones, so not wrong if early war time is depicted.

 

A good reference book that quotes Army Council Instuctions (A.C.I.) on uniforms, badges and personal kit of the British soldier in WW2 is "British Army Uniforms & Insignia of World War Two" by Brian L. Davis ISBN 0-85368-609-2

 

V interesting, ill have a look at that, Thanks

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I have come across a pair of 1944 boots with Rubber soles but not on the heels. Also, drivers tended to remove the rear buckles on the belts as they get caught in the seat backs.

 

Another top tip, its all in the detail. Cheers

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Though never done (as far as i know ) the water bottle was officially carried in the small pack along with personal items and the pullover.

 

Ashley

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Though never done (as far as i know ) the water bottle was officially carried in the small pack along with personal items and the pullover.

 

Ashley

 

Yes, strange that, not very good if you need a quick drink whilst on the move. Pullover, thats next on my list of wants along with the Great coat.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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The rubber soles were often stick on placed over the leather soles that hadn't had nails knocked in. You know of course never drink out of a chipped enamel cup. The SBR should be type 4 up to about 1941 then type 5. Note also DO NOT ever try it on. Better to tape up the slots. There is asbestos in the filter. You have Bren puches on the webbing, this is agin later in the war. Early issue were the small rifle pouches. The Bren pouches would go with teh No 4 rifle.

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My Father was in 279 fld Coy RE 15 ( scottish Div) . His Rank was Driver because His trade was driver /mechanic, lots of strings to his bow; metalsmith , oxy welder, crane op. etc etc.

When I got my RAF license in 1967 all our footwear ( both boots and shoes) were leather sole; I hated certain vehicles as they didn't have pedal rubbers. I remember commenting to my Dad saying about slippery pedals especially in the wet ; He replied when you are a real driver you will be able to drive in hob nailed boots just like I did ??

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My Father was in 279 fld Coy RE 15 ( scottish Div) . His Rank was Driver because His trade was driver /mechanic, lots of strings to his bow; metalsmith , oxy welder, crane op. etc etc.

When I got my RAF license in 1967 all our footwear ( both boots and shoes) were leather sole; I hated certain vehicles as they didn't have pedal rubbers. I remember commenting to my Dad saying about slippery pedals especially in the wet ; He replied when you are a real driver you will be able to drive in hob nailed boots just like I did ??

 

My old man was with Hants Fortress RE 1938, 576 field park coy 1942/43, 171 Tunnelling Coy 1943/46 then 577 construction Sqn post war TA. Until I get his service records thats all I know, plummer by trade but as you say did everything.

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The rubber soles were often stick on placed over the leather soles that hadn't had nails knocked in. You know of course never drink out of a chipped enamel cup. The SBR should be type 4 up to about 1941 then type 5. Note also DO NOT ever try it on. Better to tape up the slots. There is asbestos in the filter.

 

You have Bren puches on the webbing, this is agin later in the war. Early issue were the small rifle pouches. The Bren pouches would go with teh No 4 rifle.

 

Yes I have the pouches in the earlier picture with the early war pea green webbing. The Pattern 1937 Web Equipment published 25th October 1938 have pictures of the bren pouches as in service?

 

This is a great site http://www.karkeeweb.com/1937main.html

 

Cheers for the info.

Edited by BIGREDONE

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Re the water bottle in the small pouch,

It is to my understanding that a spare is to be carried in the small pack with the second in its cradle on the belt. There is nothing wrong with the use of white enamel mugs, they where used from the 30s well up to the end of the war.

 

 

Looking good, i look foreword to seeing more threads like this.

Ollie

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Re the water bottle in the small pouch,

It is to my understanding that a spare is to be carried in the small pack with the second in its cradle on the belt. There is nothing wrong with the use of white enamel mugs, they where used from the 30s well up to the end of the war.

 

 

Looking good, i look foreword to seeing more threads like this.

Ollie

 

Yes been meaning to do this for a long time, I will scan the kit issue page of the 1937 booklet and post up. I have even seen a 24 hour ration box being carried in the cradle. The only thing is, if you carry the bottle in the small pack and it leaks out wouldnt your kit gets a soaking? I know, least of their worries, but.....

 

Anyone know what the story is with the ground sheet v cape, when did one succeed the other or didnt they?

 

The jumper is refered to a cardigan in the book, so is a cardigan a cardigan or jumper as we know it?

 

Was the gas cape used/carried in the mibble east?

 

Cheers

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Re the waterbottle. Here is what the book states.

 

It reads that the water bottle was removed from the small pack and placed on the webbing when changing stations. It also looks like that only your eating equipment was held in the small pack, with washroll etc held in the large pack.

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Edited by BIGREDONE

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Hi,

the cardigan as far as i know was a `V `neck pullover (we had wartime dated one issued to us in the cadets in the early seventies) not that i have seen an origonal one for many years. though the middle east variety are more available.

 

Ashley

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"...drivers tended to remove the rear buckles on the belts as they get caught in the seat backs..."

 

I've got two webbing belts, one inherited from my uncle who was an RAMC medic, the other was my dad's - he was a REME driver/mechanic. They were both skinny boys back then, and both belts are set to the same size (too small for porky me to get on these days!). The only way to tell them apart is that dad's one has had the rear buckles taken off. Believe it or not, until I read this thread tonight, I had no idea why!

 

The things you learn...

 

All the best, Glen.

 

PS. The one thing I can remember my old feller telling me about his uniform was that once he got to Italy he begged, borrowed or stole the denim "overall" versions of the battledress as it was much nicer to wear than the serge type. Most of the pictures I have of him from then though he's in a filthy boilersuit!

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Regarding studs in boots, for drivers. there is an official date stated then studs were REFITTED into boots for ALL arms of service, (per this date drivers and Armoured vehicle crews were exempt. Typically I can't lay my hands on it at the mo)

 

Has to be said, after talking to vererans, what was worn 'in barracks' and was worn in field did vary dependant on co's tollerance, etc.

 

White mugs fine, andas for rear buckles being femoved from web belt, walking out purposes only, (and only then in some regts)

 

Andy

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I have 3 types of waterbottle carriers. Type 1 is the 'skeleton' model, with the press stud on the front. Type 2 is the 'skeleton' model with the press stud on top of the bottle (right next to the neck), and type 3 is the full sleeve model.

 

The full sleeve type is dated 1942, but on the others the dates are worn off. Is there any specific period these types were used? I can post a pic if needed.

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

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I have 3 types of waterbottle carriers. Type 1 is the 'skeleton' model, with the press stud on the front. Type 2 is the 'skeleton' model with the press stud on top of the bottle (right next to the neck), and type 3 is the full sleeve model.The full sleeve type is dated 1942, but on the others the dates are worn off. Is there any specific period these types were used? I can post a pic if needed.Greetz ;)David
Ill check my book tonight, but have a look here....http://www.karkeeweb.com/patterns/1937/1937_water_bottle_carriers.htmlCheers

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Ill check my book tonight, but have a look here....http://www.karkeeweb.com/patterns/1937/1937_water_bottle_carriers.html
Try this link

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One thing about WW2 British kit, is who wore what when. The first thing that went out the window was 'regulated pattern issue'. Not to mention feild improvisiation and private bought kit. (Not a lot changes really:D) At least at that period the Goverment had the excuse 'There's a War on!'.

 

If you look at pictures from the feild, uniforms and kit vary tremendously.

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A great mine of infomation re regulations, etc is

'British Army Uniforms and Insignia of WW2' by Brian L Davies.

 

(and yes, it does go into studs or no studs in some detail. )

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Try this link

 

Thanks, that is an excellent reference. I found the (what have referred to inmy previous post as) types 2 & 3 on that page, but the type 1 remains a bit of a mystery. It is nearly identical to the Pat. 1919 waterbottle carrier, but the straps from the buckles to the front cross piece are shorter on mine than the one depicted on the website (http://www.karkeeweb.com/patterns/1919/1919_equipment_carriers.html). I guess it is either a version of the P19 or an early production P37.

 

Incidentally, anyone know if all P37 water bottle are WW2 produced, or how to date these?

 

Greetz ;)

 

David

Edited by earlymb

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