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Is this Oxford Blue?

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Is this Oxford Blue BS381C 105? If not what BSC is it?

 

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Its certainly not Oxford Blue , that's a dark almost Navy Blue. If it's a British Army (recond.) engine and ancillaries colour I think it is called "Eau de Nil" but the picture quality looks a bit too blue. BSC number I think is 316

Edited by David B.

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Its certainly not Oxford Blue , that's a dark almost Navy Blue. If it's a British Army (recond.) engine and ancillaries colour I think it is called "Eau de Nil" but the picture quality looks a bit too blue. BSC number I think is 316

 

David it's not Eau de Nil, I painted some genuine stuff on the inside of my trailer.

 

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I'm perplexed by the colour, these sites that show colour charts are a bit misleading when you look at a colour you are very familiar with often it doesn't seem quite right & of course a lot depends on the settings on my monitor!

 

I know what you mean about recon engines etc that is Sky Blue 101 which actually looks much paler & greener than this mystery blue.

 

Incidentally this blue is on two different generators the first is a No.10 from a Rover & the second a No.12 from a CVR(T)

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Clive - you are dead right about colour interpretation. I've just looked at www.e-colours.co.uk and their BSC381C colours -your picture still looks too blue to me or is it simply down to the usual "variations"

 

Is the Eau de Nil colour actually prescribed as a vehicle interior colour then and the Sky blue as an engine colour ?

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On the BS 381C colour chart to my eye it is closest to BS113 Deep Saxe Blue or BS 102 Turquoise Blue. but not right for either .

 

http://www.e-paint.co.uk/BS381%20Colourchart.asp

 

I would go for BS 4800 colour 16 E 53 Aquamarine/ Seafarer. as fairly close.

 

http://e-paint.co.uk/BS_Colourchart.asp

 

It is probably the colour you get when you tip the tail end of three different cans into one pot and stir. (although when I this I normally get BS381C Shyte brown.)

Edited by antarmike

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David yes Eau de Nil was prescribed for certain interiors such as some ambulances & signals vehicles. It was also a colour used for zinc phosphate primer, which indeed I have used on some areas of my cipher trailer & colour wise is indistinguishable from the gloss finish.

 

Yes Sky Blue was widely used on reconditioned engines & ancillaries. You can see the difference here:

 

Dscf6855a.jpg

 

The mystery blue I think would be better named Sky Blue which in contrast to the outside which looks like a sort of weak pea soup green.

 

Mike yes those other blues do look closer to it. The reason I voiced Oxford Blue is as follows.

 

The EMER describing repairs to the diodes describe that the inside should be painted with H1/8010-99-220-2046. Later on it describes painting the outside the same colour H1/8010-99-220-2046. So there is contradiction as to what has been done to both of these quite different generators.

 

Well H1/8010-99-220-2046 is a black heat resisting paint. I have never seen a generator (other than early OEM dynamos of B Series) painted black.

 

Looking in COSA H1 it lists only 3 heat resisting finishing paints for use with vehicles. Black, Sky Blue & Oxford Blue. So I wondered whether this was Oxford Blue. If it is not, what is it? What vehicle application would it be used for that requires a heat resisting property? I can't recall having seen any vehicle components painted with this colour.

 

H1/8010-99-220-2046 is the paint quoted but when you look at Oxford Blue it is

H1/8010-99-220-2047

 

So might that be a typo? If it is it hasn't been amended as this 1966 EMER has a number of hand written amendments.

 

All very strange. Before I looked inside these two quite unrelated generators I was expecting to see Sky Blue throughout. Why would there be a different internal colour scheme & why does it differ from the EMER that seems to say it should all now be black?

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Hi Clive, difficult to determine on a PC monitor: I have downloaded the pic at message 6 into my PC and Mrs A's, as expected they give different results. I have a professional BS 381c chart and the internal colour on both monitors comes nearest to BSC 112 Artic blue. It isn't just recon items that were BSC 101 it was the manufacturers applied colour in many instances; thinking back I am pretty sure the B series engines and ancillaries were BSc 101. So my thought is the internal blue may be a manufacturers standard- and it may not even be a BS colour.

my experience is an EMER is an engineering procedure or policy etc , but they do not dictate specs on manufacture. this is currently to Def Stan and prior to that specs laid down by FVRDE amongst the chain of establishments we had. The relevant spec may have been FVRDE 2051.

I also have a grey cell telling me that the insides of these components was often treated with a anti tracking laquer which also may have had anti fungal properties ????

As an aside, although a useful general guide the various "E " colour charts on line are often as misleading as they are helpful

 

So in conclusion your items may heve been manufactured to that internal colour and unless a rebuild is necessary it would not be changed.

 

TED

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Having said that the E-charts are to my eye pretty good, when seen on a poota. They all pretty well agree with each other, and what I see of something like RAF Blue grey on the charts is what I get when I paint the colour....

 

Out of interest what is the alternator from? What age is it?

Edited by antarmike

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Ted I've been waiting for you to join in as I know paint is a subject dear to your heart:D

 

As regards B Series engines I notice that for many vehicle types the provisional/troop trial UHBs show much of the engine & bits in black. With subsequent publications most components become engulfed in BSC 101. Although I note that all the Solex 40NNIP carbs refurbished by Marcus Engineering for Pigs in NI were done in black & very smart they look to!

 

Anyway moving away from B Series. I believe once I saw what I took to be a NOS No.10 in black but have never seen the like since. So you may be right that they are 101 on manufacture.

 

So this internal blue is that from manufacture or repair?

 

I can't reconcile how there is 101 on the exterior & strange blue inside on both of these quite different generators.

 

I don't understand how there are differing colours inside & out. Yet the EMER instructions in different paragraphs indicate that the interior & exterior are in the same colour & that colour is black!

 

I think the important issue on the painting is not just for preservation but for waterproofing as the generator is designed to be submerged. It all gets wet except the brush housing that is sealed off with gaskets & a diaphragm that is able to balance any internal air pressure changes.

 

The main purpose of the internal paint seems to be as an insulator as these painting instructions are in the paragraph "Waterproof barrier repair".

 

So this isn't heat resisting Oxford Blue vehicle finishing paint, but I wonder what application indicated that to be used?

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Out of interest what is the alternator from? What age is it?

 

Mike 2 types shown No.10 is from a Rover produced from 1960s. This is a Mk 3 so was the latest version so could be from 70s-80s. The No.12 is from a CVR(T) & a provisional look at 5 examples recently they all look to be the same.

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So we have Oxford Blue, heat resisting that seems to have no role in alternator repair nor indeed any known vehicular application, although it is in the COSA as a heat resisting vehicle finishing paint.

 

The bright blue inside the No.12 doesn't tie in with any special purpose paint. Most of the electrical anti-tracking paints are clear & one grey. All the alternator EMERs specify the diode packs for insulation purposes are to be painted with heat resisting paint although its type varies & is not born out by observation.

 

Generator No.12 CVR(T) Sky Blue

 

Generator No.10 (Rover) Gloss Black

 

Generator No.9 (Hornet & Mk 1 FV432) Gloss Black

 

Alternator No.1(oil cooled) Sky Blue

 

All very curious:undecided:

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