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DAN THE STEAM

Halley restoration

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Some of the people who say Britain is dead should be made to read this Forum. There is also a geography lesson seeing where in the world overseas members ply their trade as fastidious dedecated restorers. Turning out imaculate work. Inovation making tools and then making complex parts to infinate tolerences. Succeeding against the odds, Producing high quallity work, with in most cases minimal equipment. It is a pleasant education to read these posts.

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I am hoping to fit the crank and cylinders so I can make a wood con rod, to check tolerances and final details before I make the pattern.

 

I would have expected con-rods to be forged rather than cast. What material do you intend to use?

 

Machining from solid might give a better result, for a lot more work.

 

But then I doubt that the rods in an engine of this era were anything very special metallurgically, or that they needed to me.

 

If you know the max revs, the piston mass and the con-rod cross-section it might be worth calculating the peak tensile stress to get a feel for what is required. I understand how to do FEA if you don't know how to do it yourself.

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Nice to see the progress Dan.

 

I think Andy is right about the con rods and I would be very wary of using cast ones. With your kit and skills, it would be nothing to carve them out of the solid and they would give me a lot more confidence. Now, we need Mr Pugh's advice on material specification. I would suggest a low alloy steel like En 24 to quote a standard which went obsolete fifty years ago.

 

The wooden rod is an excellent idea to confirm clearances.

 

Good luck with it all!

 

Steve

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Hi all, sorry I haven't replyed to each post singularly, and thankyou all who have replyed.

 

I have done some more to the truck but progress is slow, the steering box is now only needing the key ways machining and setting up drag arm, then that is another part finished.

 

I have also been doing some more bits on the engine, and have been kindly allowed to borrow an engine frame to be able to rotate it to work on the con rod development.

 

I have also managed to sort out the final part for the bulk head, so now it really is looking more or less what it  should.

 

I will soon be looking into the hoop sticks as they hold the head board in position, I am thinking on just rolling the rad on them rather than welding rad sections into the sides.

 

Also, I will be looking into trying to make or get made a bonnet for it as that completes the look of the truck, everything else is hidden underneath.

  

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On 02/10/2017 at 9:41 PM, Old Bill said:

Nice to see the progress Dan.

 

I think Andy is right about the con rods and I would be very wary of using cast ones. With your kit and skills, it would be nothing to carve them out of the solid and they would give me a lot more confidence. Now, we need Mr Pugh's advice on material specification. I would suggest a low alloy steel like En 24 to quote a standard which went obsolete fifty years ago.

 

The wooden rod is an excellent idea to confirm clearances.

 

Good luck with it all!

 

Steve

If your going to machine em from billet then you might as well forge the blanks first... 

Edited by flandersflyer

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1 hour ago, flandersflyer said:

If your going to machine em from billet then you might as well forge the blanks first... 

I think that would make it hard to be sure of the heat-treatment condition. 

However, it would certainly save some time to have then laser-cut to at least the outline shape. 

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On 17/11/2017 at 7:07 AM, Citroman said:

Were the hoops made of metal or wood at that time?

Hi, the hoops were 2" angle iron, tgen wood slats ontop to support the canvas between the hoops. 

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Finally got the bulkhead top sorted out and dry fitted, starting to really look good now.

 

Also decided to use Tommo's colour of khaki, it looks about right on this, now to get the rest  stripped and painted, including stripping body off to finish and make steel brackets for reinforcevent. 

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Hi all, just some bits I been doing, mostly replacing studs and cleaning up cam followers, I have also dry fitted the camshaft, but this still needs some machining done to it to repair some damage.

The valve faces in the cylinders have just been remachined and valves ground to match them.

So will start to look into con rods next and patterns for water fittings.

Will also start needing to look into the flywheel assembly.

 

Also, can anyone help with info on the bottom picture, this is the remains of the oil gauge, but as you can see, it is missing the float and pointer.

If anyone has any info on this, would appreciate details.

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My early Jowett car is fitted with a similar oil level gauge . The wire from the float exits the crankcase via a piece of 3/8 bore steel tube which has a cap at the end . When the cap is removed and if the oil level is correct  the float pushes the wire about 1.5 inches out of the end of the tube . I will have a look to see what details I have of the float.  Mike

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On 15/12/2017 at 5:21 PM, smiffy said:

My early Jowett car is fitted with a similar oil level gauge . The wire from the float exits the crankcase via a piece of 3/8 bore steel tube which has a cap at the end . When the cap is removed and if the oil level is correct  the float pushes the wire about 1.5 inches out of the end of the tube . I will have a look to see what details I have of the float.  Mike

Thankyou, if you do have details that would help me on this, even ideas on the float.

 

 

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Dan, returning to your need for new con-rods and the general consensus that machining them from solid would be the best approach, can I just add something about having them profiled first to keep machining to the minimum. 

I would opt for water jet profiling rather than laser, as laser profiling can lead to embrittlement of the edges of the plate leading to cracking. Of course it all depends how much you are going to machine off after profiling as to whether it will become a problem.

In fact why not water jet profile to size apart from the bores and then there is virtually nothing to do?

Barry.

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44 minutes ago, Asciidv said:

In fact why not water jet profile to size apart from the bores and then there is virtually nothing to do?

Another option would be wire spark erosion. It is a fair bit more expensive, but can do much deeper cuts and has no significant kerf.

I was going to suggest profiling with WSE twice, once at right-angles to the crank axis to get the waist, then the actual profile. However that would still require post-machining to make the round things round, so is probably not worth the bother. 

This is clearly on a much smaller scale, but there might be some useful ideas for conrod machining. 

http://www.f1-2000.co.uk/index.php?f=conrods

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Hi all, thankyou for the responses to my previous question, I still have not been able to progress with the con rods, things been a lil crazy here plus the fact the truck is 15 miles from any machinery or workshop, I am hoping this will change in the near future with yet another move of our works.

 

I have been playing with pain colours and so on, but, am needing to do some modifications to the cab as a things need changing and altering to achieve the correct look and appearances that I am wanting from it to get best results from the basic shell. 

 

Regards Dan

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Hello All, well after along wait, I have finally finished the keyways on the steering box and drop arm, I am hoping to trial run the steering for the first time tomorrow if the weather keeps off.

 

Going to pull it about for a few miles on a strap to see how the steering feels and responds to the road ect, and then if any issues, then make notes of them and once im resettled with stuff, I will have machinery to start moving forward with this project.

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It is also with very deep sadness to find out that Jim passed away recently.

Jim is the guy who supplied so much info towards my truck, including documents and information that without this info the project and progress so far would not have been possible to achieve the level of correct details that it is at.

 

My deepest condolences to Jim's family, such a shame Jim never got to see the Halley in the flesh, also I never got chance to meet him in person.

 

RIP Jim, your help and advise on this project are immeasurable.

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Success, we have just towed the Halley about four miles about the place trying different road conditions, curves speed ect.

 

The steering is perfect, everything works first class, had the Halley up to 26mph and felt very stable and could be steered with one hand easily, even done some full lock manovers with no dragging of outside wheel.

 

This is a large step in this truck as it proves all my hard work so far and sets the foundation firm for building the rest on,  maybe Brexit should take some notes from WW1 truck builders!

 

Next job is to finish working out and machine adaptors for the gearbox to pair to the chassis, then try and sort out the cab and finish rear body including hoopsticks.

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On 7/29/2018 at 3:51 PM, DAN THE STEAM said:

Success, we have just towed the Halley about four miles about the place trying different road conditions, curves speed ect.

 

The steering is perfect, everything works first class, had the Halley up to 26mph and felt very stable and could be steered with one hand easily, even done some full lock manovers with no dragging of outside wheel.

 

This is a large step in this truck as it proves all my hard work so far and sets the foundation firm for building the rest on,  maybe Brexit should take some notes from WW1 truck builders!

 

Next job is to finish working out and machine adaptors for the gearbox to pair to the chassis, then try and sort out the cab and finish rear body including hoopsticks.

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Brexit would be fine.....if Bunches of remoaning traitors to this country didn't constantly...just continuously attempt to interfere with it... 

 

Oh... 

And nice to see the Halley is progressing... 

P. S. I've just acquired an early turret lathe by Alfred Herbert....WW1 era....or just after... 

For flat belt running from a lineshaft... 

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Hello all.

 

After many things going wrong and moving our workshop to new premises twice I am pleased to say we have now found a decent workshop.

 

Nearlly twice the size of any other we have rented before, this means the Halley is now in the machine shop and will make working on her so much easier.

 

I have also purchased an Albion A10 gearbox to fit into my chassis, it does need modifications to suit as my chassis and wheels are narrower than that of the A10.

 

I am hoping to start pushing on this project again as danger is, if I leave her for much longer I can't see me having the want to complete it with having new work commitments and overseas work that I have started getting into.

 

The past three years have been a bit bumpy, but really hoping things are now on the up.

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Posted (edited)

It's great to have you back Dan. This is one project that I, and I'm sure many others, have missed. What you have done so far is brilliant, so please don't let it go to waste. We are all rooting for you.

Best wishes and good luck,

Steve.

Edited by Ex-boy
Mis-spelling.

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Hello all, things are stirring within the doors of my workshop???

 

Gearbox crossmember had to be moved forwards about 6" due to being in wrong place for the gearbox to sit at the needed height and position.

Regards Dan

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Made up the second side lamp bracket and lengthened the other one as it didn't look right.

 

Will need to figure out front lamp brackets next, but need to find out the mounting bracket centres on the large king of the road self generating lamps , i think a 10"lense

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