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eddy8men

buried and abandoned tanks

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There is no market for tanks rebuilt from that condition however, the finished value is just not there.

 

Hmm not sure I agree. If it had the all important black cross, it would have been sold for a fair sum, rebuilt from scraps garner from all over Europe and now be worth a six figure sum.

 

unfortunately it was British and as we saw with the Crommwell it took ages to sell, it's 'market value' was really to low and, sadly, it couldn't remain in the UK.

 

time to step off the soapbox and return it the corner of the garage.....

 

julian

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I cant believe that they just scrapped it, the re-sale value is of no consequence as far as I am concerned, as I wouldn't sell it. A nice, very big project but still achievable.

 

Jon

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The leading energy behind Operation Nightingale is Dr Diarmaid Walshe (serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps) who is a Project Manager within the Defence Archeological Group, also working closely with the Wessex Archeology.

LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/diarmaid-walshe-19b92918

walshe.jpgUK00003149733.jpg

I have his current work contact details. PM me.

 

I believe the 'Richard' who is mentioned is Richard Osgood, Senior Historic Adviser to the MOD's Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO).

LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/richard-osgood-492b9552

Richard-Osgood-Cpl-Steve-Blake-Crown-Copyright-150x150.jpg

 

Dare say we can track Richard down if needed.

 

the bloke at the top is neither an archaeologist or Dr. just a bluffer.

Richard Osgood is the MOD archaeologist, second picture.

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In the north of the netherlands that was liberated by the canadians there is a story that there must be a tank that is sunk in the moor ground overthere. Canadian soldiers were trading petrol against gin. They brought the petrol to a farm with a tank but it slid from a narrow road and started sinking. There are people there they a sure the tank is still there at a depth of 5 meters. Only proof are some pictures of the sinking tank. This is one of the pictures, i think it is the the second tank on the picture that is at an bad angle. The other seems sinking too. Only thing there is no evidance in the canadian archives of a missing tank. But the people in the north are testing the ground with a radar to proof that the tank still is there...

attachment.php?attachmentid=125351&stc=1

tank.jpg

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sounds interesting. i hired a magnetometer for £30 a day to find the covenanter and it worked very well and was easy to use. that might be the best option to find large ferrous objects

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I love the fact there are dozens of civilians including a young lady standing on the tank to the rear. The rear one looks in a bigger pickle that the front one. Unless it too difficult to get recovery vehicles to the tanks I'm not sure they would have been left.

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it depenses on the fact how fast the thing was sinking. The road was at that time unhardened. On tv we did see the guy that was testing the area proof how soft the ground is there. He stuck a 2 meter ground handdrill in to it's handle like a hot knife in butter. Stange thing someone offered them already a great sum of money for the tank..:cool2:

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Are they hoping the Gin might still be in there? :-D Considering how much surviving bottles of Whisky from SS Polotician sell for.

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In the north of the netherlands that was liberated by the canadians there is a story that there must be a tank that is sunk in the moor ground overthere. Canadian soldiers were trading petrol against gin. They brought the petrol to a farm with a tank but it slid from a narrow road and started sinking. There are people there they a sure the tank is still there at a depth of 5 meters. Only proof are some pictures of the sinking tank. This is one of the pictures, i think it is the the second tank on the picture that is at an bad angle. The other seems sinking too. Only thing there is no evidance in the canadian archives of a missing tank. But the people in the north are testing the ground with a radar to proof that the tank still is there...

attachment.php?attachmentid=125351&stc=1

 

Nice Firefly..

 

Got any more pics please?

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There is one other picture. Here the registration is visible...anything you can find out about the beast?

attachment.php?attachmentid=125379&stc=1

index.jpg

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Stange thing someone offered them already a great sum of money for the tank..:cool2:
not strange at all, "Bog tanks" are time capsules because there is no Oxygen. The ones they pulled out so far look like they sank a few months ago instead of 70 years ago. They are perfect time capsules, wooden boxes, paint, cloth, everything is perfectly preserved. Stug 3 in Russia was like that,

A Sherman Firefly in that condition would be easily worth a millon Euro IMO, probably more.

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I hope it is still there but I would have thought there would be no shortage of wire rope and other tracked vehicles about (and crews skilled in recovery work) at the time to pull both tanks out. they don't appear to be under fire and the guys who got the tank stuck would be very keen to get it out seeing as they were up to no good when it turned to custard.

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Yes i wonder too. But on the pic with the 2 tanks you see the first is not as far sunk in as on the second pic. The very unstable ground and narrow road would it have made rather difficult to get rescue equipment in. The second tank did sink also??? Who knows.

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yeah that's not a bad guess, if it was near the end of the war, why risk recovery vehicles? They would have been more useful after the fighting stopped to clear the roads, haul away wrecked armor, etc.

 

what I don't understand is if the ground here is so boggy, how does that rather large Brick house keep from sinking?

 

Citroman, do you know if that house is still there?

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yeah that's not a bad guess, if it was near the end of the war, why risk recovery vehicles? They would have been more useful after the fighting stopped to clear the roads, haul away wrecked armor, etc.

 

what I don't understand is if the ground here is so boggy, how does that rather large Brick house keep from sinking?

 

Citroman, do you know if that house is still there?

 

The house would probably have been built on a concrete raft , the 'road' more or loss looks like part of the curtilage - possibly used only by generations of horse & trap + dog-carts , crush stone shoveled in a pot-holes appeared.

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They say there is a stable sand layer at about 5 meters depth. In that region of holland they put wooden or concrecte pilons in on that they build the houses fundations. Amsterdam for exemple is said to be build on thousands of pine trees...

For the house i don't know it's about 250km from here so i won't go have a look ;)

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They say there is a stable sand layer at about 5 meters depth. In that region of holland they put wooden or concrecte pilons in on that they build the houses fundations. Amsterdam for exemple is said to be build on thousands of pine trees...

For the house i don't know it's about 250km from here so i won't go have a look ;)

 

Interesting, I know of an old castle which is supposedly built on reeds bound together, also heard that some of the Victorian railways were built on the same method

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Interesting, I know of an old castle which is supposedly built on reeds bound together, also heard that some of the Victorian railways were built on the same method

 

Lifted this from Wikipedia regarding the Liverpool & Manchester Railway,on which George and Robert Stephenson were employed as Engineers:

 

"the famous 4.75 miles (7.6 km) crossing of Chat Moss. It was found impossible to drain the bog at Chat Moss, and one of the men on the site, Robert Stannard suggested timber in a herring bone layout.[15] Stephenson began constructing a large number of wooden and heather hurdles, which were sunk into the bog using stones and earth until they could provide a solid foundation—it was reported that at one point tipping went on solidly for weeks until such a foundation had been created. To this day the track across Chat Moss floats on the hurdles that Stephenson's men laid and if one stands near the lineside one can feel the ground move as a train passes. It is worthy of note that the line now supports locomotives 25 times the weight of the Rocket, which hauled the first experimental train over the Moss in January 1830."

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The house would probably have been built on a concrete raft , the 'road' more or loss looks like part of the curtilage - possibly used only by generations of horse & trap + dog-carts , crush stone shoveled in a pot-holes appeared.
very cool, never heard of such a thing before

 

They say there is a stable sand layer at about 5 meters depth. In that region of holland they put wooden or concrecte pilons in on that they build the houses fundations. Amsterdam for exemple is said to be build on thousands of pine trees...

For the house i don't know it's about 250km from here so i won't go have a look ;)

so to me that reads "the tank is only 5 meters deep" :-D

What do you mean you won't go have a look, it's a FREE TANK , all you need is a shovel and a coupe of friends with a tow rope :cheesy:

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House raft.

 

In UK coal mining area (previous underground workings LoL) AFAIK - it has been mandatory for over 50 years - a reinforced concrete raft for house building , alternatively such as Bison concrete beams. I have two houses built on rafts , one certainly well clear of any mining , one very likely because a neighbour 50 yards away purchased half of a very large garden. It nearly bankrupted him because a JCB digger broke through a capped shaft (not very well capped LoL). I observed at least 8 loads of rock tipped form 8 wheelers ! The vendor I always suspected knew , he was a master butcher / property developer - strange was it not that his own house was built using two lots for the huge garden that he decided to sell on after 5 years - not that he ever did the gardening.

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What about Winchester Cathderal? They sent a diver down, William Walker to shore up the East side. Anyway, here how it should be done.

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