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British WWII Camoflage Scheme

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Guys,

 

On the same subject, what is the best paint/coating to use to apply the mickey mouse camo to the canvas of a truck.

 

cheers

 

Mike

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Hello i Need the British Camoflage Scheme (Micy Mouse) Typ

 

 

Hello Marco

 

not too clear what you are asking for here............... do you mean the pattern, the colour or the period it was applied ?

 

Pete

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Guys,

 

On the same subject, what is the best paint/coating to use to apply the mickey mouse camo to the canvas of a truck.

 

cheers

 

Mike

 

 

Mike

 

Good question the WD found out quickly that painting canvas was not a good idea when using enamel paints of the period. ACI 1559 of 23 August 1941 notes...............

 

'It has been ascertained that paint spraying, Khaki Green N03 and paint spraying Dark Tarmac No4 has an injurious effect on canvas covers and hods of vehicles, and the use of these paints for disruptive painting of vehicle covers and hoods will be discontinued forwith'.............

 

It then goes on to say that......... 'only Paint camouflage bituminous emulsion is to be used'........ not very useful for you I'm afraid. The problem was that the spirit base of the enamel paint attacked the canvas and the varnish in the paint hardened the threads of the canvass making it brittle causing premature holing and failure of the cover at seams.

 

I assume the bituminous emulsion was more flexible and was thinned using water.

 

So what could you use now ?? I have always used a matt synthetic paint thinned down with a standard thinners, it will make the canvas 'hard' if you put it on too thick so either turn the gun down to get a hard edge and spray it on or use a brush but keep it thin.

 

Pete

 

 

 

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Hello Marco

 

not too clear what you are asking for here............... do you mean the pattern, the colour or the period it was applied ?

 

Pete

 

 

Hello i need a Picture from this Scheme at a Vehicle front, left, right, top i will Paint my Vehicle so

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Here is a basic Mickey mouse scheme - note however that the canvas has NOT been painted - it should have been painted with black as well

 

width=530 height=375http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g306/00ec25/Morris/morrisc8withtitle.jpg[/img]

 

This is not a very good example but may give you a basic idea.

 

For those in the know please do not be too critical of the painting I will re do it at sometime in the near future :oops:

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Not only is it a CMP it's also a Chev,

 

I do believe your beginning to weaken Mcspool............you know it makes sense :tup:

 

Pete

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Hi Pete,

 

Thanks for the reply,I am about to replace the original canvas on my MW, the cab canvas has been painted black and the rear canvas has the mickey mouse camo on it, I didnt want to wreck the new canvas by applying something that would eat the thread or remove the waterproofing,it looks like the original has a black bitumastic coating.

 

Mike

 

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Not only is it a CMP it's also a Chev,

 

I do believe your beginning to weaken Mcspool............you know it makes sense :tup:

 

Yeah sure... :yawn: Please explain why it seems only Chevrolets are camouflaged. Maybe Fords can be driven standing proudly from the crowds?!? :-D

 

Subject matter related: see more pics here.

width=640 height=477http://www.amv-lilliput.org/modelli/Docum/C8A_2/PIC/Image1.jpg[/img]

 

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The second picture is a better representation of how Mickey Mouse Ear was supposed to be.

 

From memory of what I read 30-40 years ago. Vehicles were churned out of factories in base colour (khaki, then olive drab toward the end of the war).

 

Mickey Mouse Ear involved applying overlapping circles of black to cover all upward-facing surfaces and break up the shape of all vehicle-identifying edges e.g. wheel arches, window frames. It is a camouflage scheme after all.

 

So the top canvas was supposed to be entirely black and MMEs extended along the top and bottom edges of the sides.

 

Of course, crews slapping paint on in the field may not have known how it was meant to work and just did their thing.

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Guys,

 

I dont know if anybody can help me regarding the subject of painting the mickey mouse pattern on the cavas of a truck, I think earlier in this discussion somebody contacted me saying that they had good results from using black screen printing ink, trouble is I have lost the details of the company that supplied the ink.

 

Can anybody help.

 

Thanks

 

Mike

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Guys,

 

I dont know if anybody can help me regarding the subject of painting the mickey mouse pattern on the cavas of a truck, I think earlier in this discussion somebody contacted me saying that they had good results from using black screen printing ink, trouble is I have lost the details of the company that supplied the ink.

 

Can anybody help.

 

Thanks

 

Mike

 

Hi Mike .

Its Russ here Iv'e often thought about useing fabric paints which you can get at a local hobbycraft .

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Sounds very complicated. Why not just use black paint, like what the squaddies did. It sticks like **** to a blanket, and it'll look propper. Just put it on thinnish so it soaks into the fabric, it'll last for years, and fade slightly to give a nice patina.

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If your paint is oil based that you painted the body with .Use it to paint the canvas .Idid the ALBION 20 years ago with no problem .And is still on the original WW2 canvas TONY

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Guys,

 

Thanks for the replies, I will pass on the info, a friend has just bought a WOT 15 cwt and wants to put the mickey mouse markings on the canvas.

 

 

Cheers

 

 

Mike

 

 

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I own a Ford WOT2 and after much research and confirmation from the original paintwork on the truck, a 1943 WOT2 should be painted Brown (Service Brown No3) and then have Mickey Mouse camouflage painted on in GREEN, not Black. This was also carried onto the canvas, and was applied by Ford at the factory. The IWM photos KID3804, KID3803 and KID2178 show a factory fresh Ford WOT2 of contract S2019 which dates it at early 1943. I rubbed down the paintwork on my own Ford WOT2, which is also from contract S2019, and found the Brown base coat with Green camouflage. It seems to be that the Black camouflage was applied to vehicles with a base coat of Green, such as Jeeps. As far as I am aware, all British built Ford vehicles were Brown. I know for certain my 1943 WOT2 was Brown with Green camouflage, and also my 1944 Ford WOA2 was also Brown with Green camo.

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I'm sure I came across somebody on Ebay yesterday doing paint for canvas, they were called specialist finishes or something like that.

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Thought i'd ressurect this thread rather than start a new one. As i'm going to be painting our Scammell Pioneer this summer following its ground up resto i wanted to delve into other peoples knowledge on british WW2 camo schemes. I'd like to put some sort of disruptive camo on the Scammell, Mickey Mouse or other, but i also want it to have the invasion star. Now i've been told that post D-Day everything was just green with no camo. Can anyone shed any light on this and suggest how i might authentically apply some sort of camo and invasion star over the top?

Many thanks, Richard

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Like many things in life there is not a definitive answer to your question it really depends on number of factors,  the first and probably the most critical is when was your Pioneer built ? as this will determine what the specification for the factory finish would have been which may sound not a very useful way of answering your question however bear with me.

Front line units engaged in the second front were issued  with a lot of new vehicles and your are correct that by this stage of the war they would be coming out of the factories in Olive Drab British standard camouflage colour No 15 (not quite the same shade as US olive drab) and for the most part would not have have had a camouflaged over pattern applied. 

However second line and support units  used vehicles that had been on muster for perhaps a couple of years and unless they had been into workshops for a full rebuild as specified by ACI.533 dated 12 April 1944 it is unlikely that they were repainted  so it is more than likely to have seen trucks in G3 Khaki green with Nobel's Dark Tarmac No4 disruptive patterns in the pattern now commonly called 'Micky Mouse' . 

There is now another "but I'm afraid" and it's this since 30th May 1942 (ACI 1160) the basic colour for both A and B vehicles will be 'Brown' SCC No2  disruptive patterning would be SCC No 4 until stocks were exhausted then  No 1A (very dark brown) would be used instead and once again if these vehicles had not been through workshops they would not have been repainted.

All this is a long winded way of saying basically the choice is yours go on the web and look up Mike Starmer his book on 'British Army and Disruptive Camouflage in the UK, France and NW Europe' is the accepted authoritative volume on the subject with colour chips of all the colours used appended in the back

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby

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Thanks for your input chaps.

The vehicle is already partially painted olive drab and i'm not repainting it now. Its a 1942 vehicle.

It seems plausable to me from your responses and the Bedford MW thread that it could have had some sort of disruptive camo and retained it up to D-Day at which time invasion markings would be applied.

I'm just anticipating some smart arse coming up at a show and telling me "it wouldn't have been painted like that".

I'll definately have a look at Mike Starmer's book.

Thanks, Richard

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