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Top Ten Tracked Armour Safety Tips

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OK - at the risk of sounding like a bit of a H&S geek - those who served no doubt had certain key things drilled into them but for the rest of us who just have to pick it up as we go along - any top tips please !

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OK - at the risk of sounding like a bit of a H&S geek - those who served no doubt had certain key things drilled into them but for the rest of us who just have to pick it up as we go along - any top tips please !

 

For starters in no particular order.

 

1. Wear a helmet when inside AFVs, it bloody hurts if you bang your head.

 

2. Ensure you get somebody to guide you when reversing your AFV, and ALWAYS check behind first.

 

3. Always lower the decks under control and keep feet etc out of the way.

 

4. Always use 3 points of contact when mounting/dismounting your AFV.

 

5. If the engine is running only mount/dismount your AFV from the front, to ensure your driver knows your getting on/off.

 

6. Always wear ear defence when running up your AFV.

Edited by recymech66

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make sure you lock the hatch down securely when in the open position, i had a mate commanding a saxon on a brake test with the hatch unsecured, when the driver braked the hatch pushed his head onto the armour and ripped his face off, never saw him again, poor b#stard, still it could have worse it could have been me.

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9 The driver is to be well versed that he may be the owner but he drives under the command of the vehicle commander who should be competant person not a 13 year old with no experience. I have personal experience of this one, came a fraction away from flopping a CVRT on its side because I could see and appreciate things the driver could not

 

10. Do your first parade checks and maintenance and take them seriously, your working with a very lethal weapon if it goes pear shaped. Ever thrown a track on the high street?

 

11 Have a viable and fast plan for recovery. We dont go off the property without discussing this and talking with our recovery assets.

 

 

my 2 cents worth

 

 

R

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I would also add that it's worth contacting local LEO and let them know your plans. Even if moving armor on trailer, rather than driving it, there are plenty of moms in minivans that will call police because you might be a terrorist. I would not want to be pulled over like that, especially since you might not see the officer or hear them, and that will make them very twitchy.

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Warning to self !

 

Instead of crossing your fingers and saying it'll be OK ! it always has been before !

Read notes 9, 10 and 11, commit to memory, and adhere to those rules !

 

Many good points raised.

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Ensure the driver and commander know what each hand signal means, too many times I have been guided by some tw#t that would look more at home on a disco floor than in front of me.

 

Hi-viz ensure commander is wearing this when dismounted, it does help a lot.

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Dont attempt, or be tempted to support yourself while driving a ferret, by placing your hand anywhere around the hatch openings. They will invariably slam shut and take your fingers off.

 

Dont inadvertaently sit under the spent cartrige shut in an M113. When we would pile into an M113 on live fire exercises, we always pushed the new guy into that seat.

 

Dont sleep under an armoured vehicle if your an infantryman, even in the fowlest weather. The vehicle will start up at some unexpected hour and run over you. It has happened many times.

 

If being transported as an infantry section in an APC, dont eat the crews rations. They get very upset about it and fist will invariably fly around.

 

When the rear ramp on an M113 closes, remove limbs, shovel handels, gun barrels or any other equipment you dont want chopped in half.

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Don't fart inside an armoured vehicle. It makes the other occupants VERY unhappy!

 

That made me laugh.

It can be bad enough in a car let alone in a tin box...

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To add to a very good list.

 

a) make sure you have liability insurance, for those in and around your Vehicles.

b) If carring people, conduct a suitable "crew" briefing before anyone goes near it. Focus on safe egress, such as in case of fire.

c) Clothing. As "snag free" as possible, and fire resistant ( more cotton....less poly.)

d) Intercom system, at the very least between driver and CC.

e) Checklists (I'm an ex-military pilot...these are hard wired to my brain) . checklists are great for all postions, regardless of your background with armor.

f) Checklists again, pre start walk around and systems checks.

g) if in doubt...dont.

 

have an armor day!

 

cheers

Nick

CWC Canada

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A working intercom system between driver and commander . The commander has 360 view around the vehicle a driver a LOT less .

How long does it take to pass on a hazard warning to the driver with out one .

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I have done many miles in CVRTs on the roads on my own.

 

It does depend on which vehicle you're driving as to what visibility you have, but I think if you have to rely on a commander then perhaps you shouldn't be on the public roads with it?

 

Good mirrors are a must. As is a backup plan for when it breaks down, because at some point it will.

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Probably the biggest one is Read The Flipping Manual (RTFM). But remember health and safety has probably moved on a bit since it was written. Check what you can't do, but think twice about what you can.

 

I've heard too many stories of accidents from people falling off or out, so always keep the lower half of your body (or your passengers) inside the vehicle.

 

Similarly, always be certain of where your feet are in relation to moving turret baskets, and never put your fingers somewhere you can't see first.

 

Another big one that's not been mentioned is hazardous substances. Be careful of radioactive materials (glow dials etc.) and asbestos (engine bay linings, pipes, etc.). If you've got a new vehicle of cold-war era, check and deal appropriately.

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If it hasn't been run for a long time, is an unknown quantity, or people have been in there pressing buttons at a show, double, triple and quadruple check before starting / driving.

 

Seen and heard of too many machines that have done something unexpected (and dangerous) on start up because a valve or a lever is stuck or because someone left a control in the wrong position.

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1. Use ground guides

2. Use ground guides

3. Use ground guides

4. Use ground guides

5. Use gr.....

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1. Use ground guides

2. Use ground guides

3. Use ground guides

4. Use ground guides

5. Use gr.....

 

 

YES!

 

One if not THE most important.

 

There was a certain Sherman that backed over a linesman truck in a town near here. Yes, they had a guide, but just the one at the front. Truck drove up on the opposite side of the Forward GG, therefore...crunch.

 

I find that heavy armor used by the military always uses two GG's

 

Nothing moves around here unless we have GG's, we even have a writen policy for it in our operations maunal.

 

 

Nick

CWC Canada

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Don't fart inside an armoured vehicle. It makes the other occupants VERY unhappy!

Accept that if you are going to live for weeks in an armoured vehicle, living off Composite Rations, it's going to stink. Dreadfully. Live with it. If it was good enough for Gemini and Apollo astronauts, it's good enough for armoured vehicle crews.

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Accept that if you are going to live for weeks in an armoured vehicle, living off Composite Rations, it's going to stink. Dreadfully. Live with it. If it was good enough for Gemini and Apollo astronauts, it's good enough for armoured vehicle crews.

 

Fair cop, but the last time I looked, the question was posed by someone who is in all probability, NOT going to be carrying a bunch of stinking sweating squaddies who have been out in the field for weeks on end. Yes, after a couple of days of that, a fart won't make a difference (btw, I know what it's like, I wore a uniform for 14 years), but you will have to admit that it IS a bit hard to hide a stitch ripper stinker when you're battened down. Especially if the people you're with are just joyriders.

 

As a tongue in cheek response, astronauts on the gemini and apollo flights had their suits on all the time, apart from taking the helmet off at times I think. Bit like the wet suit effect I suppose, and I bet it still wasn't funny when the neck seal leaked what they'd just released!

 

Best, M

Edited by ltwtbarmy

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