Jump to content
griff66

MOT Testing Exemptions Consultation VERY IMPORTANT

Recommended Posts

Looking forward to the rolling 40 years MOT exemption.  Just get a insurance and free road tax and no out of SORN inspection or MOT needed. Just changed the 2.25 petrol to a 2.25 diesel in my 1975 land rover and lets get rolling! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Not exactly playing Devil's advocate myself but, having spent many years in the motor trade (a long time ago) and having recently become involved with the maintenance of some heavy-ish preserved vehicles, I am of the opinion that no vehicle used on the road should be exempt from MOT testing unless it is operated by an organisation with the capability and responsibility to subject it to a stringent routine maintenance schedule, e.g. The MoD and emergency services.

A case recently came to my attention, of a preserved vehicle from the 1950's which is MOT exempt and in use on the road. One day, the owner complained that the brakes were poor. To cut a long story short, it transpired that the front brakes were not working at all (cylinders all seized), the rear brake cylinders were working (but leaking) and one rear hub oil seal had failed, allowing oil to contaminate the linings on that side. So, only one wheel with effective braking on a vehicle which weighs over eight tons and is capable of over 60mph. How long the vehicle had been used on the road in that condition is anybody's guess but my point is that a rolling road check as part of an MOT test would have flagged up these issues long before the vehicle became the deathtrap that it was.

Yes, I know that you all maintain your vehicles to an impeccable standard but there are also people with older vehicles who will do the minimum that they can get away with. The requirement for an annual MOT test raises the standard of that minimum and, let's face it, is a relatively inexpensive way of obtaining a pretty comprehensive roadworthiness check for your own peace of mind.

Edited by mtskull
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mtskull, I am from abroad , but can tell you that we had to go to MOT  every year with our pre 1950 vehicles , it was troublesome , because none of the MOT stations had a clue about the regulations of the older vehicles , 4x4 vehicles could not even do the brake test , so there where loads of complaints from well maintained vehicle owners , and finally the 40 + year old vehicles are exempt , I have not yet come across one unserviceable vehicle at rallies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Well it is spring and the beginning of the MV (antique vehicle) driving season.  So yes it is time to give your vehicle a through saftey inspection.  This should be happening reguardless of requirements for MOT, DOT etc. inspection.  It just takes a couple of examples of MVs or other antique vehicles having break failure in a parade with injuries resulting and stuff is going to hit the fan.

I will agree when we had required inspections here in New Hampshire, the people at the inspection station had no idea how inspect my military vehicles, they just were not qualified to do it properly.  In every case over a 20+ year period of these sham inspection I got inspection stickers without them inspecting or at most they would ask to see if the lights worked.  Our state system now exempts all vehicles over 40 years old.

Unfortunately I have seen a number of cases when brakes on military vehicles involved in Club events had brake failure.  Run aways on long hills while traveling in convoy, inability to stop at stop lights.  Some cases it was the same owner who just could not grasp the concept that they had to repair, adjust or replace their brake system.  Strange that they never noticed that after the 2nd brake failure that a couple of us with big trucks always seemed to be in line ahead of them in parades or convoys we figured it was better for them to run into us instead of somebody driving a Jeep.

 One of our long time CCKW drivers recommends the following.  "Everytime you start your truck, while it is warming up a little STAND ON THE BRAKES" his logic is it far better to have the peddle go to the floor while you are sitting still. As part of my own spring inspection is test my brakes on our dirt road, on a straight section at 30MPH I stomp on the brakes just hard enough to lock the brake, then release pull over and looks at the marks did all four wheels lock evenly.

Thanks for bringing the topic up, you just gave me the topic for my Tech Tips section of our clubs newsletter.

Cheers Phil

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trouble is that not all drivers can be trusted.  I am keen on elderly Land Rovers and, quite often, if I see one about, or for sale, I pop its details into the DVLA website and look at its MOT history.  More often than not, even enthusiasts' vehicles' MOT records are appalling - with fails in most years.  It seems its sent in for an MOT, it fails on several points, the garage puts them right and issues an MOT within a day or two, often with several advisories which then appear the following year, and off it goes for another year of indifferent maintenance from the owner .  And, all too often the failures are chassis rot, brakes or steering related.  If I were insuring a vehicle exempt from an MOT I would demand proof of roadworthiness in any case, whether it be a formal MoT or a qualified engineer's report.  And no matter how diligent we are in our own maintenance, it never hurts to get someone else to give our vehicles the once over, it is easy to miss something.

There was an "immaculate" Volvo 245 for sale on the Classic car website recently.  It looked superb and had a write-up to match.  It had failed its first attempt at an MOT every year since 2008.

10 68.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am as i stated happy for the MOT excemption, i am also for more roadside checks to make sure vehicles are up to a roadworthy standard. I have been given a 1975 s3 land rover civillian for my wedding gift, i did get it delivered by flatbed as it stood for 8 years after it was someones toy. The brake drum was 2mm thick, redone all copper plumbing aswell as new shoes, drums and the front anchor plates as they were a bit corroded. Seen a 101fc ambulance fail its MOT as a steel brake pipe failed during the brake test, the owner needed help with replacing the lines and i had the tools and next round it passed it. I have spotted a crack in my swb chassis, it will be inspected by cleaning the gunk ofd, screwdriver test and welded up, it was missed during the MOT though.

xlarge.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 12/18/2017 at 8:26 PM, John Comber said:

.

 

Edited by Nick Johns

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

For your information I submitted a request for clarification to DfT regarding the term "reasonably available" and eventually received the following in reply:

"[MG question] 1. Can you please define what “reasonably available” means in relation to the following context “changes that are made to preserve a vehicle, which in all cases must be when original type parts are no longer reasonably available” 
 
[DfT response] In respect to your first question, some thought was given at the time the guidance was drafted as to whether “reasonably available” should be defined. It was decided that as what “reasonably available” meant would vary in relation to every part for every vehicle model type, that a strict definition of the term would not be helpful. Individual vehicle owners are best placed in each instance to determine what “reasonably available” means in relation to their particular circumstances."

Make of that what you will!

I do not propose to poke this particular anthill any further.

 - MG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2018 at 6:57 PM, 10FM68 said:

If I were insuring a vehicle exempt from an MOT I would demand proof of roadworthiness in any case, whether it be a formal MoT or a qualified engineer's report.

As an aside to the general topic I don't believe insurance companies care one way or the other whether a vehicle they are covering is roadworthy. They will happily take your money. If the vehicle is found to be unroadworthy following an incident they will simply invalidate the insurance.

 - MG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Changes to a vehicle, if i cram a 300tdi with automatic in to a series 3 lwb as a disability adaption, including left foot accelerator for a amputee or convert a 101fc ambulance with a 3.9 V8 with automatic gearbox for the same purpose, how will that stand when they hit 40 years of age? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

21 hours ago, TooTallMike said:

I do not propose to poke this particular anthill any further.

 - MG

But one day ,the ants might come after you Mike, forwarded is forearmed !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×