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With specific protection bar i think it is an Opel. See at the left row. At the right are different models with extra coil springs under the normal ones like the Mannesmann Mulag had.

 

opelLKWs.jpg

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Here an surviving Opel again in the weird colour scheme that Sinsheim uses often on restored vehicles. The protection bar is not original but the shape is. They have great french observation balloon whinch truck. Perfect restored but painted in bordeaux red with yellow accents....

 

21220854144_0f12ac8cff_b.jpg

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Although it can be helpful, I would be wary of basing identification primarily on a detail such as a headlamp protector, as this sort of equipment might well have been subject to addition or modification in the field. 

Fundamental details, such as chassis, axles and drive train are a more reliable means of identification; looking at these, I would say that the overturned lorry in the photo is certainly not the same model as the Opel in the museum.

Can we be sure that the overturned lorry is actually of German origin? -it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that it is a captured allied vehicle.

 

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59 minutes ago, mtskull said:

Although it can be helpful, I would be wary of basing identification primarily on a detail such as a headlamp protector, as this sort of equipment might well have been subject to addition or modification in the field. 

It does not seem to be the same as the Open one anyway. The Opel one is  tubular and outside the headlamp bracket, whereas the one in the photo seems to envelop the headlight bracket and has a riveted or bolted-on top section. 

Whatever it is, it is chain drive so not a Dennis. 

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I said already the Opel from the museum doesn't have it's original bar. Only the shape is ok not the material. And yes it is slighty more modern with the extra springs. On the row with parked lorrys you see both versions.

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Strictly not WW1 or of military origin, this 1906 Aries  2 ton lorry has recently  'surfaced' in France , dry stored ,complete and original, one family ownership since 1948. Reputed to have been last used to distribute food during WW1 at Auxerre.

Richard Peskett.

IMG_20180328_123544_resized_20180328_074708950.jpg

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That's lovely, but I bet the steel tyres are a whole lot of no-fun on metalled roads. 

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Can anyone identify this pair of front wheels. Rim diameter is 850mm. The longer hub cover contains a spring loaded drive, possibly a speedometer drive.

 

5ac29cef3c515_mysterywheelsandleyland002.thumb.JPG.e6c8547561e4e9c2bc920f4eb1285194.JPG

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Like Redherring says AEC. The domed bearing caps can have a series of stamped numbers on them and the letters AEC. These are not heavily stamped though.

Alternatively those wheels could be from a Daimler considering the tie between the companies.

 Doug W

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The rim has a lip for the tyre to be pressed up to, and the scallops facing the camera are so the tyre can be pressed off. On the other side are lugs around the rim for bolting something on. Vulcan wheels are a lot smaller in diameter, though interestingly there were some Vulcan rears at the same sale as this pair.. The only marks on the hub caps (that I have noticed) are smudged casting numbers.

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I was thinking the price was a bit steep, even though it is likely to be very rare and sn exotic make. Maybe they put one too many zeros on it ?

 

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Yes, it is super rare, but if it sells for that price it would be the most expensive WW1 IC truck ever sold.. Probably a unique survivor. Used by the Italians during WW1 and strangely enough also by the US Forces when they went to Italy. It is a very handsome machine. 

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I would guess that's from a towed trailer. It has the standard subsidy wheel bearings which were common to all makes in ww1. Not sure about the maker though.

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850mm dia rims. So is English and not American (who used imperial sizes). The axle is obviously home made so not a reference point..

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