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Great War truck

WW1 finds and discoveries

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I came across this story today about a Mack and a Mathis truck discovered back in 2001 in a warehouse in the centre of Marseille.

http://www.forum-auto.com/automobiles-mythiques-exception/voitures-anciennes/sujet390721-1925.htm

Did anyone on here heard about these trucks before? They were in a splendid original condition, and I do hope they haven not been painted since.

All the best for 2018!

Marcel

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What a wonderful find! Thanks for posting, Cel. I shall look forward to finding out what has happened to them!

Steve     :) 

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Posted (edited)

Some years ago they did also find 2 ww1 trucks in the Bourgogne region if i am correct they were in the store of an wine merchant. Shall see if i can find pics.

Here an german tank in Berlin

 

Dtank.jpg

Edited by Citroman

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That's one of the two built post-WW1, on Überlandwagen chassis. 

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H&S insanity prohibits such sharp and unyielding objects in kids playgrounds today (in my country at least). And that provided a windfall for a friend who collects old vintage tractors. He noticed council workers digging an old 1930s Fordson tractor out of its concrete base and he offered to dispose of it for them. It had been exposed to the weather for at least 25 years and was all seized up. But today it is running again and in pride of place in his collection.

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We played in the broken down machinery of an abandoned coalmine. We got cuts an bruises but we loved it. ^_^

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This idea that modern playgrounds are to be bubble wrapped and hermetically sealed against all risks is a load of old tosh.

I’ve managed playgrounds and the European Standard actually states that  a child might break a limb in the process of playing, and that is an acceptable risk as that is how the child learns.

Doesn’t mean that we’ll just leave lots of huge pointy things laying about though.

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Found on the web this nice pic of an german truck accident in France, a few kms of where my uncle lived. South of Verdun.

madine_accident_de_camion.jpg

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Looks like the guy on the left is planning on starting it!

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Why were all those bodies still on the truck whilst it was being manhandled though?

Steve

Edited by Ex-boy
Inadvertent apostrophe

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1 minute ago, Citroman said:

To have extra weight on the drive wheels?

I wondered about that, but the ground looks pretty dry and solid, especially on the side shown, where the weight is possibly concentrated. It does puzzle me.

Steve

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By the way it looks as the man in front of the fallen truck is using a large wooden jack. Not sure what is trying to lift though.

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19 hours ago, Citroman said:

By the way it looks as the man in front of the fallen truck is using a large wooden jack. Not sure what is trying to lift though.

If that is a jack, then the extending piece appears to be bearing on the chassis dumb iron, which would make sense as it would tend to assist the righting action.

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On 15/02/2018 at 6:03 AM, Ex-boy said:

Why were all those bodies still on the truck whilst it was being manhandled though?

Steve

Looking at the photo the road surface appears firm by the feet of the men, but the area to the rear of the lorry shows many small stones on the surface as if they have been flicked up by spinning wheels and a lose of traction. Adding weight using people as a load would increase the grip. The chap by the fallen lorry has a number of lengths of timber about providing a solid base to position the jack on. 

Identifying the makers of the two vehicles is the next question. 

 Doug W

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Anyone here bought this nice RFC grouping? are some vehicles in the photoalbum.

Was at an auction last month in Tunbridge Wells.

Cheers,

Lex

 

001.jpg

041a.jpg

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Did find this binoculars on an belgian fleamarket. Was attracted to it  by the engraved Touring Club de France. it was to remind that they were offered to the army in WW1. You also see engraved MG on the top. Which i first imagined being the owners initials but it turned out to be Ministere de Guerre. So next time you see old binoculars check those engravings.

 

jumelles-3e24e4a.jpg

jumelles_touring-3e24f16.jpg

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On 14-2-2018 at 10:07 AM, Citroman said:

Found on the web this nice pic of an german truck accident in France, a few kms of where my uncle lived. South of Verdun.

madine_accident_de_camion.jpg

The tyre profile on the rear wheel of the fallen lorry seems unusual?

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Citroman said:

Did find this binoculars on an belgian fleamarket. Was attracted to it  by the engraved Touring Club de France. it was to remind that they were offered to the army in WW1. You also see engraved MG on the top. Which i first imagined being the owners initials but it turned out to be Ministere de Guerre. So next time you see old binoculars check those engravings.

 

jumelles-3e24e4a.jpg

jumelles_touring-3e24f16.jpg

That poster is fascinating and doesn't pull its punches:

"Cut down (literally "reaped") by a machine gun that they are unable to see"

"You can save the French soldiers"

"The machine gun that our soldiers did not see, killed them when they attacked. Give them the eyes to see and our cannons will destroy it"

"Here the naked eye sees nothing, the binoculars observe the machine gun"

"The battlefield seems empty but the enemy is everywhere, crouched in the gulleys or hidden in the woods, always ready to be unleashed and give a hail (literally "hurricane") of fire".

Edited by mtskull
Corrected translation

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On 14/02/2018 at 8:07 PM, Citroman said:

Found on the web this nice pic of an german truck accident in France, a few kms of where my uncle lived. South of Verdun.

 

The underside of most vehicles intrigues me.  So what is it?  My first guess is Daimler Marienfelde. 

Unfortunately the photo presented isn't particularly clear.  

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Don't think so, daimler had cardan drive this one has chains. Looks like the grill protection bar goes around the headlights.

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Posted (edited)

As I understand it, the Daimler 3 tonner (the German equivalent of Britain's "subsidy" lorries), had chain drive. Some heavier models had cardan shaft drive.

Edited by mtskull

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