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Redcap

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About Redcap

  • Rank
    Warrant Officer 1st Class
  • Birthday 06/29/1964

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  • Location
    South London area
  • Interests
    Amateur Radio, Re-Enactment
  • Occupation
    On the buses
  • Homepage
    http://www.practicalairsoft.co.uk/80-provost/index.html

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  1. Read the document, makes sense. Replied to consultation. Whether the arse-covering politically correct idiots in the corridors of power decide to use common sense on this, or not, is a completely different matter. :rolleyes:
  2. Good to know, used it earlier to book my place :-) See you all there
  3. I like it. I reckon they got it spot on, to be honest. That they're marketing chocolate with period-style wrapping is nothing new, really - remember the "Keep calm" style bars a couple of years back? However, the proceeds from the sales going to the RBL is a GOOD twist to this, one I whole-heartedly approve of.
  4. I'll go with Robin's reply, above. As the owner of a Series 3 109, which also happens to be my daily drive, I find it a dead easy wagon to drive around in. Granted, I've had hells own delight in fixing a couple of dashboard switch issues (heater blower & wash/wiper) in the last week (still not completely fixed, lack of time, suitable weather, and those thrice-be-damned lock-rings (smooth sided nuts)), but they're pretty-much there now, which emphasises the point that even a mechanical clutz like me can have a bit of fun (ahem. That's one word for those damned lock rings!:banghead:) both driving and fixing older ex-military wagons!
  5. I cold bloody cry. I really could. I just moved home, and was trying to find the box with the older radio kit (incl the 290) that I'd packed - and the damn things gone walkies Not the only thing either; a box of clothes, a box of books (thankfully nothing irreplacable), and bizzarly, spare kitchen stuff. Had a word with the removals people, they can't find it in their 'misplaced boxes' store either. Just bloody glad my other (more frequently used) radio kit was shifted my yours truly the day before the move! Just peeved about the 290, not to mention all the patch leads, gash coax, et al. Irritating is not the word :mad: At least the PRC-320, ID-51A, VX-5R, and FT-817ND (have you noticed the size/portability trend there? ), plus PSU /tuner and a few other odds and sods are all safely accounted for! :-D
  6. heh, nice I've got one in my back window that says "Land Rover: 0 - 60 in three weeks" :nut:
  7. Hiya Clive That's a heck of a lot of operating and recognition - nicely done Something of a black box opeator here, and I still have my old FT-290R mk1, although I'm not at all sure it works anymore - haven't used it in close to a decade; I have to replace the mike cable at some point too, but as I've got an FT-817ND, that task's taken something of a back seat - especially with the acquisition of a PRC-320 recently! 73 Roger G1LIW
  8. Redcap

    Jeep Stolen

    Posted about it on Twitter, just in case. Direct link: Hope this helps, and hope you get the Jeep back to it's rightful owners toot sweet.
  9. Berets are something of a nitroglycerine-like topic for many in the British Army: Paras would be more than likely to remove your head from your shoulders, were you to suggest changing the colour of their beret, for example; for many, the beret colour is a regimental identifier. Here is a list of beret colours, and the regiments that they link to: Khaki Foot Guards, Honourable Artillery Company, Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, Royal Anglian Regiment, Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, Royal Welsh, Yorkshire Regiment, Royal Gibraltar Regiment, 4/73 (Sphinx) Special Observation Post Battery RA Light grey Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Dark grey Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps Brown King's Royal Hussars, Royal Wessex Yeomanry Black Royal Tank Regiment, W (Westminster Dragoons) Squadron, Royal Yeomanry Dark (Rifle) green The Royal Dragoon Guards, The Queen's Royal Hussars (with broad brow band), The Rifles, Royal Gurkha Rifles, Small Arms School Corps, Essex Yeomanry Maroon Parachute Regiment, All ranks serving with 16 Air Assault Brigade (not restricted to Parachute qualified personnel) other than the non Parachute Regiment Infantry Battalion or Army Air Corps and attached Arms personnel. Beige Special Air Service including attached troops who are not SAS-qualified Emerald grey Special Reconnaissance Regiment Commando Green Commando qualified personnel serving in Commando units (including the Special Boat Service) Cypress Green Intelligence Corps Sky blue Army Air Corps Scarlet Royal Military Police (incl non-RMP attached personnel) Green Adjutant General's Corps (except Royal Military Police, who wear scarlet; Military Provost Staff and Army Legal Service, who wear navy blue), Military Provost Guard Service Navy blue all other Army units (except Scottish line infantry regiments and the Royal Irish Regiment). Likely as not, you'd probably find a fairly sharp and pointed argument of bayonet-shaped proportions being levelled somewhere sensitive on your person, were you to suggest that they trade in their regimental berets for an army-wide camo beret - this in addition to it being considered a rather peculiarly American fetish-like affectation, and "not the done thing over here, old boy"...! As to field caps, yes the army issued a couple of formats - actually, now, three; the 60-pattern OG "Combat Cap", a slighlty simplified DPM Combat Cap (with a slot on the front of them for a cap badge to be applied), and now, apparently, an MPT combat cap. I'm in agreement with the Paras over the nick-naming of these things - they tend to call them - and apologies for the luggage here - "Crap Caps", or similar more... um... explicit phraseology...! I don't know if the idea has ever been mooted to the General Staff at any point, but given that former Paras and SAS occifers have been CAS in recent years, I tend to think that they may well have told the sponsors of such radical ideas to do the "walk away with short jerky movements" thing
  10. I think that's probably the best course of action; glad we were all able to help
  11. Hi. Dave's given a brief reply above, but I thought a more in-depth reply might be of use, so apologies if this bores the wossit out of anyone... Oh, and while I'm at it, you looked at the previous version of the CWP website; the current site can be found at the link (click on the banner) in my sig strip Anyhow, while we use slightly more modern wagons (Land Rovers), the law of the land covers everything, not just modern kit, so applies to WW2-like Willis Jeeps as well; the guidance in our rules book is via both Primary and secondary legislation; please bear with me, as this gets a leeeetle involved... The list of primary and secondary legislation on blue lights is as follows: The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989 (1 November 1989): Index - Part I - Part II - Part III - Part IV The Road Vehicles Lighting (Amendment) Regulations 2005 (21 October 2005) The Road Vehicles Lighting (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2005 (12 December 2005) The Road Vehicles Lighting and Goods Vehicles (Plating and Testing) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 (4 January 2010) The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use)(Amendment)(No.4) Regulations 2009 (4 January 2010) The Road Traffic Exemptions (Special Forces) (Variation and Amendment) Regulations 2011 (15 April 2011) The Road Safety Act 2006, Section 19 Fitting and use of sirens, two-tones, etc., is covered by s.37 (Audible warning instruments) of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986, which states: (4) Subject to paragraphs (5), (6) and (7) no motor vehicle shall be fitted with a bell, gong, siren or two-tone horn. (5) The provisions of paragraph (4) shall not apply to motor vehicles— (a)used for fire brigade, ambulance or police purposes; (b)owned by a body formed primarily for the purposes of fire salvage and used for those or similar purposes; ©owned by the Forestry Commission or by local authorities and used from time to time for the purposes of fighting fires; (d)owned by the Secretary of State for Defence and used for the purposes of the disposal of bombs or explosives; (e)used for the purposes of the Blood Transfusion Service provided under the National Health Service Act 1977 or under the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1947; (f)used by Her Majesty's Coastguard or the Coastguard Auxiliary Service to aid persons in danger or vessels in distress on or near the coast; (g)owned by the National Coal Board and used for the purposes of rescue operations at mines; (h)owned by the Secretary of State for Defence and used by the Royal Air Force Mountain Rescue Service for the purposes of rescue operations in connection with crashed aircraft or any other emergencies; or (i)owned by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and used for the purposes of launching lifeboats. As regards the use of the word "Police" on vehicles, while Service Police (e.g. Military Police) are not civilian Home Office-accredited forces within the meaning of the applicable laws, the complication is that the word "Police" is used in the title, thus it could be argued that the Police Act 1996 could be applied, specifically s.90(3)&(4), PA 1996; 90 Impersonation, etc. Any person who with intent to deceive impersonates a member of a police force or special constable, or makes any statement or does any act calculated falsely to suggest that he is such a member or constable, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale, or to both. Any person who, not being a constable, wears any article of police uniform in circumstances where it gives him an appearance so nearly resembling that of a member of a police force as to be calculated to deceive shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale. Any person who, not being a member of a police force or special constable, has in his possession any article of police uniform shall, unless he proves that he obtained possession of that article lawfully and has possession of it for a lawful purpose, be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 1 on the standard scale. In this section - (a)“article of police uniform” means any article of uniform or any distinctive badge or mark or document of identification usually issued to members of police forces or special constables, or anything having the appearance of such an article, badge, mark or document, (aa)“member of a police force” includes a member of the British Transport Police Force, and (b)“special constable” means a special constable appointed for a police area. Now, the Armed Forces Act 2006 makes mention of Service Police, but fails to give any real definition of what a Service Policeman actually is, so we fall back on the good old s.74(4) Army Act 1955-style definition of "a person who is lawfully exercising authority on behalf of a provost officer" (s.67 AFA 2006). However, this still does not give any clear prohibition of using a Military Police sign on a vehicle when not in military ownership, so again, we have to fall back on the law contained within s.90(3)&(4), PA 1996, and add a healthy dose of Common Sense ™. The upshot is that we do not display blue lights or anything with the word "Police" in it when not on show or display site land, and most definitely will NOT have them fitted on public roads, the thinking being a combination of "better safe than sorry" and "think of the adverse headlines in the tabloid press if we screw up". I do recognise that this seems a bit like a lecture on the topic, but I had to refresh myself on the topic and become rather familiar with it all when we started up CWP, so hope the research we had to do will be of benefit to you too Hope the above helps!
  12. OK, new keyboard please. For some odd reason, mine appears to be covered in coffee at this time You NEVER hand me a straight line like that, the tasteless possibilities for one-line ripostes are almost endless :evil::rotfl::nut: Oh, and lemme know if your D1/C1 entitlement is still there, when you get it back, please
  13. Tony - Outstanding news - thanks for the heads-up:-D
  14. OK, well, until you've heard back from them, there's little point in my adding to the queue, so if, when they tell you, can you let us know how they intend to make this happen (or not), please? I dare say a number of us on here will be waiting the news with suspiciously beer-less breath
  15. REALLY?! First I've heard of that, and I asked about this ten years back when I took my Cat D test for the buses - they said at the time it couldn't happen! So, how does the conversion from an Auto to a manual 'D' ticket work, cause I'd like that too (Full manual car ticket here too, since 1981 even:nut:)!
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