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nz2

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About nz2

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    New Zealand
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  1. A thought as to the radiator baffle; When an engine is working very hot there is a danger when checking the water level. Hot water can splash up through the filler cap opening. The baffle would redirect water reducing this splashing. A second point could be as an indicator as to how fill a radiator should be. A check on two radiators here show no triangular baffle but a circular shaped additional casting positioned vertically instead. Doug
  2. Another photo please, square on Doug
  3. Can you clean up those casting marks as one appears to be the letters JAC. If so it is a foundry name. I have JAC marks on some Thornycroft parts and have found the initals on other castings of the time. Doug
  4. Do any of the gears or shafts from the latter gear boxes measure up to be the same size as needed?
  5. What was the procedure with applying paint to the canvas. Is the yellow paint a sealer only ? I recall making canvas covered canoes all those years ago and sealing the canvas with linseed oil before applying the various paint layers. The weight of the canoe increased greatly due to the addition of the paint. I was expecting that I would follow a similar line to that used years ago, come the day when a roof is ready here. One day... Doug
  6. The shape of that scuttle suggests the chassis is for a charabanc body. Doug
  7. Can I get a PDF copy please . Some where in a box is data sheets like this. Trouble locating what file box. Probably mis-filed in a different box.
  8. Delightful art work. Five years after the end of The Great War, but a shorter time frame for Middle East conflicts. To me this illustrates the influence of the British occupation, with lorries of the time still in use. The driver judging by his clothing appears to be a local, so again indicating a further acceptance of the transport. From this however comes more questions. At the end of hostilities were lorries sold off in Egypt to local companies or to British firms operating contracts for the army, and other industries. A suitable title for the artwork. " The supply line continues using Leyland Lorries" Doug
  9. A few more complete Leylands in NZ. A GH2 of 1926 showing the local adaptations. Different front wheels and a hoist for the deck. Chassis 5950 of 1916 as arrived at home. RAF type. Not complete as per the others, but mechanically all there. Still looking for a suitable radiator. The correct disc front wheels are now waiting to be placed on.
  10. More NZ Leylands in collections. This Leyland Cub was converted as a rail inspection vehicle in 1934 for use by the General Manager of New Zealand Railways. It has a jack centrally mounted allowing it to be raised off the track and the vehicle turned around. Latter the body was covered to a overhead line inspection format. How it remains today. On the theme of inspection, this Leyland served the Auckland Tramway board. Built 1924.
  11. Leyland N.Z. Chassis 1385; S583 Dated 1913 The radiator has since been replaced with a copy of the Mill's Leyland radiator. Chassis 15151. Dated 1923 Gisborne Museum. Waiting in turn for restoration. Chassis 36018; Southward' Car Museum
  12. From New Zealand. Complete vehicles. Starting with Leyland. Original 1912 . One family ownership since new. Chassis number 718. Geraldine museum rebuilt cab otherwise it was a complete vehicle. Dated 1919. Chassis no. 9481 Leyland number 18173. Dated 1923. In my son's collection. Has wrong wheels on the front.
  13. nz2

    Karrier WDS

    Is that list showing only operational vehicles, and or those under restoration? Does it include museum display lorries?
  14. Also, visible on the inner reflector plate is the patent number, (refering to the rather natty spring catch) followed by an abbreviated date, in this case 1915, which happens to be the year of the truck. (The two sidelights are 1916 and 1917 respectively.) That date of 1915 may not be a manufacturing date, but a date of lodging the patent. Nice to see the photos of the lights ready for installation. Doug
  15. Yes; NZ plates on the ute and trailer. Nice to see another Thornycroft off for a rebuild. Doug
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