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61Ferret

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About 61Ferret

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    Lance Corporal

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    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

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  1. I acquired my 1942 M3A1 White Scout car back in 2017 and it's one of the ex-Greek army scout cars that was brought back to the USA in the early 90's. I've been slowly working on changing things to make it represent one that would have been used by the Governor General's Horse Guards during the Italian Campaign. The scout cars issued to GGHG had been used by the British in North Africa and the GGHG used them for their Assault Troops in Italy. To help with making it represent one used by the GGHG, I have just installed a Wireless 19 Set but still missing some cables. I fabricated and mounted the aerial brackets last year and do not interfere with the canvas top when fitted. Fitting Instructions, dated 1945, issued by The War Office were used as my guide for fabrication and installation. Cheers, Terry
  2. Pretty sure the driver's/vehicle's left fender has a 1st Canadian Divisional sign on it. Others have suggested the same thing making it a Scout Car serving with the Royal Canadian Artillery.
  3. No, not me, but I have seen the post on MLU. I'm slowly working on making my Scout Car look like one that would have been used by the Governor General's Horse Guard in Italy for Recce/Assault Troop use. They were issued with British M3A1's that were used in North Africa. Have built and installed antenna mounts on the back and now working on an interior stand for a 19 wireless set. Some pics attached from Remembrance Day a few weeks back.
  4. Since selling my Ferret and acquiring a M3A1 Scout Car, I haven't been on this forum for a while but have found my way to this thread via the G503 Forum. The photo of the Scout Car having a unit sign of 43 was also posted on the M3A1 Facebook page where I posted my thoughts on this. I’m going to suggest 2nd Canadian Field Regiment (Artillery) of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. From 1939 to 1943 - Training in the U.K. July 1943 - Sicily. 1943 to January 1945 in Italy. They were in Holland, post January 1945. In the Facebook post/thread, I believe that the member here going by the user name of Old Git stated the photo was dated May 1945. This would also help to support my thoughts on this. The reason for my suggestion as follows. In the photo, the two soldiers in the Scout Car definitely have a cap badge that is in the shape of a Commonwealth Artillery Cap Badge. In the photo, on the driver’s right fender, there is a unit sign. The number 43 over the typical unit sign rectangular base that has a dark coloured top and light coloured bottom. From https://www.canadiansoldiers.com/vehicles/markings/unitsignsinfantryunits.htm, one of the choices would be 2nd Canadian Field Regiment (Artillery) with red top and blue bottom back on the unit sign. From the photo, on the driver’s left fender, there is a formation sign. It appears to be a maple leaf over a dark coloured base. From https://www.canadiansoldiers.com/vehicles/markings/formationsigns.htm, one of the choices would be 1st Canadian infantry Division. A gold maple leaf over a red background. Research on the internet suggests that red appears darker than blue in black and white photographs. With the dark shade being common to both the unit and division sign and assuming the dark shade being red as per the info I found on the internet, this strongly suggests the photo being of a Scout Car in service with the 2nd Canadian Field Regiment (Artillery) of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division in Holland. If my analysis is correct, this is a nice and rare photograph of the M3A1 Scout Car in Canadian service during WWII.
  5. Catch 22 LBDR has pretty much nailed this on the head. I went through this three years ago and once out, I took the tank to a fuel tank repair shop. They cleaned the inside and then sprayed the interior surface with an epoxy coating. There was a lot of hardened sludge at the bottom of the tank and corrosion on the upper surfaces that they easily removed. They cut two access holes into the tank so that the hard to reach areas were not missed. These were obviously welded back up before the coating was applied. The tank still looks as good today as it did the the day that this was done. I found that the fuel lines from the bottom of each side of the tank to the fuel selector valve also needed cleaning. I continuously pushed a thin flexible wire back and forth through these fuel lines. The end of the wire had loosened up a bunch of crud which easily flushed out. Cheers, Terry.
  6. On the other side of the pond...The Royal Canadian Legion Branch 82 of Port Credit Ontario organized a D-Day remembrance ceremony which took place on Sunday June 5th at the Port Credit cenotaph. The ceremony started with the playing of O Canada, followed with a prayer, hymn, message, laying of wreaths and playing of Last Post. Along with the public, Legion members, St. Andrews Mississauga Pipes & Drums and 845 Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets, I was proud to participate with my Ferret. Although my vehicle is not WWII vintage, it was very much welcomed and respectfully parked close to the cenotaph. Lest We Forget.
  7. The following link will take you to a compilation of pictures from a recent visit to the Canadian War museum. Those of you who have already visited know the museum is an excellent experience and for those of you who have never been...make it a priority. For those of you that distance makes it difficult....enjoy the following! Cheers, Terry.
  8. I live in the city of Mississauga, Ontario, Canada and there is a non-profit organization called Heritage Mississauga that promotes local heritage/history. Last fall, they produced/launched a video titled "I am Mississauga - Mississauga Remembers". A great video...well done. The following link should take you to that video. http://www.heritagemississauga.com/page/I-Am-Mississauga---Mississauga-Remembers Having participated with my military vehicle in the last two Port Credit Remembrance Day ceremony processions and the recent WW1 Souterrain Exhibition, I am proud to say that Mississauga does Remember and I am honoured to be part of this community. Cheers, Terry.
  9. As pictured, the valve is in the reserve position. When I had the fuel tank out of my Ferret a few years back, it was easy to follow the fuel lines back to each side of the tank and hence confirm the main/reserve position on the fuel cock. Cheers, Terry.
  10. Awesome video! Looks like you and your group, King's Own Texas Dragoons, have a great thing going there. You've managed to achieve the perfect mix of military vehicle expertise and having a hoot. How cool is that!!! If I knew that my Ferret could make the drive from Mississauga (Ontario, Canada) down to Texas without a major breakdown, I would certainly make the drive so that I could go out for a spin with you guys. Keep up the great work, look forward to more video and perhaps we'll meet up some day. Cheers, Terry.
  11. Hi Robin. Interesting thread. The engine and gear box look relatively clean or repainted. Have they been recently serviced? Have you taken apart the fluid flywheel as yet? Merry Christmas and Best Wishes for the New Year! Cheers, Terry.
  12. Although cloudy and somewhat cool, the rain held off and the ceremony was well attended by the public. Participants in the procession (Legion to cenotaph and back to Legion) included many Veterans, Police Officers, Fire Fighters, Politicians, St. Andrews Pipes & Drums, others and our group of four Jeeps and my Ferret. Once again, it was a honour and privilege to participate. The following link will take you to a selection of photos. Cheers, Terry.
  13. The exhibition is now open to the public. Opening day was yesterday and the turn -out was great. The exhibition has exceeded everyone's expectations. Support by other groups and organizations was excellent. If you're in the area, come out and be amazed! Cheers, Terry.
  14. For those who may want to visit or just read more about it, the WW1 Souterrain Impressions Ehibition is coming to Mississauga, Ontario. It opens on September 26th and will be in Mississauga until November 30th. From the internet and Heritage Mississauga, this exhibition illuminates the lives of Canadian veterans through the deeply personal carvings and drawings made by soldiers concealed in the allied caves and trenches near Vimy Ridge, France. The exhibition includes reproductions of carvings and images of the cave system at Vimy and the story of Canadigm’s work in developing the exhibition. "On April 17, 1917 at 5:30am, four Canadian divisions consisting of over 15,000 soldiers who had been stationed in the tunnels near Vimy Ridge 10 metres underground for weeks, stormed the Ridge and Hill 145 successfully capturing this strategic site. During those long weeks, soldiers carved regimental badges and messages to family back home using the soft chalk walls underground. For many it was their last communication; 3,598 Canadians were killed at Vimy". I believe that admission is free. More info available at http://souterrainimpressions.strikingly.com/
  15. Sean/Richard. Thanks to both of you for taking the time to respond and offer some suggestions on how to address this issue. Shall certainly try the adjusting the fuel mixture and the two short pipes between the exhaust elbows are in fact loose, something that I was aware of because of the extra noise. When I first acquired the Ferret, there were some remains of a previous attempt to fill the joints and reduce the exhaust leak but there was not much there at the time and now nothing remains of that attempt. Fixing the two short pipes was on my list of things to repair but now that I know it may be causing the backfiring, I'll move it up a few spots on my list. Again, Thanks....greatly appreciated. Cheers, Terry.
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