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guykay

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About guykay

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  1. Has anyone else being following the you tube vlogger?. He is rebuilding a T55 that they acquired from the U.K. Some if the stuff has English subtitles, but even the stuff that hasn’t is quite good ( to my untutored eye)
  2. If you have just put the correct amount of oil into the gearbox, then use a piece of stiff wire, or flat spring steel strip to find the oil level down the existing bit of dip stick pipe that protrudes out of the gearbox. Add about an inch onto the length & make up a dip stick to suit
  3. Can’t help with piccys I’m afraid, as I e sold my Samson but I remember that I detached the handle from the end of the dipstick, then cut off the top of the stick to leave the existing markings on the bottom & then reattached the handle. the dipstick is made of something like 1/4” wide x 1/16” spring steel. I'm sure someone on the forum can give you correct dimensions. it makes checking the oil in the gearbox a lot easier
  4. The original dipstick goes from the gearbox, turns through nearly 90 degrees and goes through the bulkhead. You have to be nearly double jointed to get at it. Also the short tube sticking out of the gearbox mates up with the bent tube with a bit of rubber tubing jubilee clipped on to each one. It’s rubbish, and when trying to put the dipstick back in, the end inevitably gets stuck at this point. I read somewhere that you should put a bit of a bend on the tip of the stick to help alleviate this. It does a bit, but it’s still rubbish. I also read that the dipstick emerges in the drivers compartment because early cvrt’s had the gearbox cover bolted down? I modded my dipstick by cutting it off short so that it stayed in the gearbox compartment. That way it’s straight, short & easy (ish) to get at
  5. I think forgetting the claas was either still in gear or had the hand brake still on when they were winching it out was an “issue”. It would have saved a lot of shovelling
  6. The winch operators seat was in front of the controls. It could be tipped up so you could operate the winch seated whilst closed down, in which case you had to rotate the cupola so you could see what you were winching and also the tacho. Or it could be folded and tipped up, then slid to one side out of the way so you could stand up. Winching was always supposed to be done closed up in case of cable breakage. I can see the fast payout toggle switch mounted on the ceiling of the compartment in a one of the photos, does yours do anything?
  7. That was my samson the winch was a commercial one, but I can’t remember the manufacturer. i did have the manual for it, but it went with the vehicle to Canada when I sold it
  8. The rear spade is raised& lowered by hand. It’s ally so not to heavy theres a central bit that drops in between the arms & is located with a couple of sliding pins. you drop the arm, fit the middle bit & then reverse back to jam the spade into the ground! the winch was by all accounts a bit crap & I believe lots of them were removed & the Samson basically used as a prime mover for towing dead cvrt’s back to base the Holley bones were special for the Samson & the towing loop could be removed & a pulley fitted in its place. This assembly was mounted on the top rear of the hull with a wire stay to hold it in position. The winch cable was run over this to make a sort of crane for pulling cvrt power packs. Again it was a bit crap & I don’t think ever used. I used it to make a death slide for the kids. There’s some photos on the site somewhere. It was great for that!!!
  9. Hi Malcolm yes, the winch cable can be run over the top of the vehicle & out the front for self recovery. There should be a set of rollers on top of the vehicle, and another at the front, although a lot of these were removed I think when extra storage bins were fitted on the front
  10. Hi Malcolm as I remember it, the clutch pedal is depressed to release the holding brake (which is actually a car clutch plate), The lever is pulled towards you to winch in & away from you to pay out. You have to pull the cable off the drum as if you don’t keep tension on the cable it won’t come off. You cannot pay out without the engine running. There is a fast payout toggle switch on the ceiling of the compartment. Mine never worked, or at least didn’t seem to make any difference!
  11. Right I have unblocked the breather outlet where it comes through the hull, it was indeed blocked with crud The exhaust manifold adaptor(4 bolts to one of the rattling tubes) is broken. Left hand one looking from the exhaust side of the engine. Any idea where I might source a new one? removing the distributor heat shield to gain access to the manifold bolts of course resulted in both 1/4” retaining bolts shearing, so I will need to drill them out & tap them, deep joy!!!
  12. Hi Chris you may be right and I am overfilling it. But the operators manual says the correct level is just below the filler cap. This always seemed a bit odd to me as there is no expansion vessel on the cooling system and surely the water must expand when hot. So if it’s completely full the excess is bound to vent out of the system through the pressure cap i’ll check the vent hole in the hull as it may well be blocked
  13. My mk 2 Ferret has been bought back into commision, and on its first run out was steaming from the top of the radiator on its return. Steam seems to be coming from the pressure relief device. The little vent pipe had become disconnected. I put a new bit of flex pipe in, but it still seems to steam a bit. Any ideas? Also I have always topped of the water to the top of the blue fillet cap, but whenever I check it has disappeared. The engine temperature seems stable of a bit high. Again any ideas? one last thing, one of the fourbolt exhaust manifolds has come loose. Two bolts have disappeared. Is there supposed to be a gasket there? If so where can I get one from?
  14. Mike The thread on my seat didn’t look particularly worn, just some slight flatting of the threads on the sides. Might be worth sticking a bit of theaded rod up to see if it does the trick
  15. Hi Mike i don’t have a replacement seat extension thingy, but I do know how to fix yours. I posted something on the forum a couple of years ago about it. The threaded portion gets flats on it & the bit that should grip it doesn’t anymore. Chop of the threaded bit from the squashed part with the hole in it leaving a bit of thread, cut a length of M10 threaded rod to the same length that you have cut off, and join this to the squashed bit with an M10 nut. Job done
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