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Barney

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About Barney

  • Rank
    Lance Corporal

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  • Location
    Norfolk UK
  • Occupation
    Retired. Past occupations – Precision & General Engineer; Motor Engineer; Maintenance Engi

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  1. Moving on one from Richard Farrant's post may I suggest that having found the area of the leak by pressurising the tank that you re-slosh the tank and pressurise it again with the slosh in the leak area. Hopefully this will force the slosh into the hole and seal it. John
  2. Sorry, re-thought this post and decided it might cause more problems than it would solve so decided to delete it.
  3. Hi Steve I have always set the ring gaps to those that I was taught during my training and have never had any problems. For bores 2 to 3" - 2 thou per inch of bore pro rata For bores 3 to 4" - 3 thou Ditto For bores 4 to 5" - 4 thou Ditto Sorry but I can't give any info on ring temps. Hope this helps. John
  4. Congratulations to you all on getting the engine running. Re; Tight engine I am supprised to see that they still make 'Running In Oil' which should help ease a tight engine. Morris Lubricants supply what they call 'Classic Running In Oil' available in stright grades 30sae and 40sae. Re; Acceleration problem I seem to remember that there is a spring controlled govenor on the camshaft, is this coming in too soon and stopping the engine accelerating; weak or soft springs prehaps. John
  5. According to the Chiltern Vehicle Preservation Group website the origin of the CC registration is CC - Bangor (Caernarvonshire) and ran with a prefix letter to 1974) The Old Classic Car website says the CC reg ran from Jan 1904 to Mar 1934 John
  6. Steve, I found this supplier for copper tube in a selection of wall thickness. The 1 1/4" tube is available in 6swg, almost 4mm, 10swg, approx 3mm and 13swg, approx 2mm. I don't know anything about the company and have no connection with them. http://johnhoodandcompany.co.uk/materials/copper/copper-tube Hope this may help if you have to go for a heavy wall tube. John
  7. Steve, You have got the right idea except that the wooden formers are not strong enough to contain the sideways expansion of the tube, they need to be made in steel with a groove that is about 1/4" deeper than half the diameter of the tube. The former needs to be a good tight fit on the tube. Hope this helps. John
  8. I found this video on YouTube and it gives a good lesson on brazing steel; this is the way I was taught. You will notice that the plates are set 1/16" apart and when he turns it over you will see that the braze has formed a nice fillet and has not run down the plates. Steve said he placed a ring of brazing rod around the joint and tried to melt it into the joint as you would do for silver solder but bronze is of a much thicker viscosity and it won't run into close fitting joints. I remember at senior school we made a garden rake in the metalwork class. This required the round bar tines to be threaded into a length of flat bar. We were instructed to make the threads a rattling good fit because we were to braze them in. The teacher made up the spelter, as it is called, by mixing what looked like chips from brass that had been turned in the lathe and borax into a paste. I can't belive this was all that was in the mixture but when spread over the top of the thread and heated to a dull red with a Flamefast town gas and compressed air torch it melted into the joint without any problems. John
  9. I have noticed that Bright Drawn Mild Steel angle has a sharp angle in the bottom and on the top edges, Black Mild Steel is rounded. Merry Christmas all. John
  10. Steve, The tank looks really Grrrrrrrrrrrreat. Just a thought, considering that the paint had difficulty adhering to the outside of the tank how do you propose to clean the inside of the tank to get the 'Slosh' to stick? What would worry me, if I was doing this, is if I couldn't adequately cover all the surfaces inside the tank would the petrol get behind the coating and start to peel it off and block the pipes or filters. John
  11. Steve said I had a go but could not get the solder to run. This could have been the solder which, I believe, was of the lead-free persuasion. I don't have much confidence in that either. Can anyone offer any suggestions on using this combination? Just some general information. Most plumbing fluxes now come in two types, potable water and heating systems/general purpose. Potable plumbing solder is lead and cadmium free and uses silver as a replacement which raises the melting point by about 15 dgs. I find that it joints brightly cleaned copper very well but no hope of a good joint when soldering ferrous metal with potable flux. Leaded solder wire 3mm o/d (general purpose) is still available on eBay. Fluxite and Laco are good all round rosin based paste fluxes which works well on ferrous metal and for tinning things like braided vehicle earth straps and big lugs. Rosin solder is not corrosive so works well on electrical joints and PC boards that cannot be washed clean after soldering. Bakers No3 liquid flux is acid based and brilliant for ferrous metals but is not recommended for non-ferrous metals. Note, wash the finished joint in water to remove all traces of acid. I prefer Fluxite but I like to use Bakers for work where it is not possible to get the components as clean as I would like. Fluxite, Laco and Bakers No3 are also available on eBay. My old school metalwork teacher spent some time in the REME in North Africa during WW2 and he said that when they ran out of flux they used Camel Piss; is there a zoo near you? John
  12. Steve, the brake rings look great. The old lathe is interesting, no tailstock and the toolpost looks as though it belongs on a capstan lathe; presumably it was intended to do a simular job as you have done on the brake rings with repeatable accuracy on large batch machining. John
  13. Steve Most of the spinning videos on YouTube are for domed shapes but this one is for a pot shape and it's about the size you require. Hope it helps. John
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