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mammoth

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  1. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Andy, looking at the radiator resto photos reminded me that I need to restore my wings back to the original 'flare angle' as they are bent and look quite manic at the moment. Can you put one of those electronic angle blocks on top of the wings and across the chassis.
  2. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    With regard to finding the correct motor I have just received an exciting (doesn't take much) email with these pics from a Dennis correspondent in South Australia. No explanation so he knows how to tease!
  3. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    It is indeed pressed brass and looking like soldered joins, though as we dig deeper I am taking nothing for granted.
  4. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    It is not impossible that NSW Fire Brigade did a rebuild of the vehicle at some stage, either for further service or even just for parades and the like. As it appears that the radiator header tank has never carried a badge I thought that maybe it was a reproduction but the plumbing on the reverse side is too good for that. Maybe is was supplied as a spare part? I have done some internet search on the Daimler Benz OM65 engine and it is a ringer for the 1942 version which was used in the L300 truck so loved of war movies. The design first started around 1932 as the 105 x 140mm OM65/3 giving 4846cc and 65hp. Then OM65/4, and then the 110 x 130 OM65 giving 75hp, finally ending production in the mid to late 50's. All figures are woolly or back to front as there are inconsistencies across different web sites. It uses an in line Bosch distributor pump. In case we have Merc guru the engine No is 306535156. Barry, I was not aware that there were different sizes of Gwynne pump, so the whole business was about customising to the customers needs, which is not surprising considering that motor fire pumps only became available in 1905. More pics for Ben. There are no serial numbers on the gearbox - just "H&L gears" Does this refer to over drive gear set?
  5. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Just to give an idea of what I am looking for here is a pic of the engine and chassis Dennis T head engine.pdf Dennis 191x chassis_0003.pdf I have got the offer of assistance from NSW Museum of Fire who are doing a search of their records for it's service record.
  6. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    I said earlier that the modifications to the chassis were well executed. As it turns out 15 minutes with an angle grinder was all it took before the rest of the welds simply broke off, so very reversible modifications. The Merc engine has been installed without chopping away the sub frame, so what I now have is the most un-molested and complete chassis of this era I have ever seen. The bonus is that all the original tin-ware is there and can be dealt with by way of some sessions with the english wheel, hammer & dolly. Where to now? I think the Merc engine can stay where it is as it is doing no harm, and as Ben has found, scouring the world for a spare T head engine is no mean feat. What hope of securing a Gwynne pump which is what makes a fire engine a fire engine. Do I go ahead and build a replica of the original braidwood body on the assumption that a younger generation won't notice the gaping hole. Or take the easy option to a quick finish by presenting it as a commercial lorry. After all, quite a number of engines did end up this way after end of service life. (reality in Australia was that as they aged they were re-allocated to smaller towns, then villages and not unknown to rack up a service life of 40 years). Incidently, these old hard rubber Dennis had overdrive and thus were good for 30mph at a time when trucks were rated at 12mph and pushed at 18mph. Must have been quite impressive back in the day.
  7. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    + Aaaarrgggh... A check in better light reveals that the chassis is 3033, verified by the actual stamping on the chassis rail. On the scuttle plate is engine No 4726, body No 3259. The spare engine has No 15049, and the spare gearbox 7204 I have been referring to brochures which can be downloaded off "Fire engines in preservation" web site, specifically the White & Poppe 1911 and the Dennis Motor Fire Appliances circa 1913. This was a time when nomenclature was far from standardised so for example Dennis give wheel sizes in inches rather than the later standardised metric range. It also seems that W&P label their engines on the RAC rating while Dennis have used the bhp rating for the same engine.
  8. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Thankyou gents for the interest in this project. The engine No I got from the plate on the scuttle, so I will check it as well as the body No which is also on the same plate for what appears to be an anomaly between the record and the physical.. Re; keeping the Merc engine: Some of you are up to speed with the thinking now enshrined in the Turin Charter promulgated by FIVA, and which is especially relevant to commercial vehicles which more often than not changed over their working lives. However, the engine transplant although well executed does not appear quite complete and may be an unfinished project. The engine as described by Ben would be the 35hp 4 cylinder T head type which would suggest the fire engine was one of the smallest versions with a 150 gallon pump . The radiator brass work on mine appears to be plainer than in contemporary photos and no sign of a badge - how were these fitted? The wooden wheels can be rebuilt but I will need the steel /rubber rims. The Dennis brochure states 32" , and is not clear as to whether this is the rim or outer tyre diameter. Google found an entry for 'Haes & Eggers' as importers in a Sydney directory of the time with Gwynnes of London sharing the business (not Dennis!?), so the next step will be to see if NSW Fire Brigade have this one in their records. So many questions.
  9. mammoth

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    It appears that it was converted to drive a pump fitted amidships, the Mercedes diesel engine grafted into the engine bay. Prior to purchasing the Dennis I thought I would be really clever and buy this Dennis engine and spare gear box at a big collectors auction in the same region. Alas, the engine numbers tell the story that it is not the missing engine (No 4725). Any ideas about the clutch?
  10. I have recently acquired the remains of an old Dennis which, although not the oldest extent Dennis, may possibly be the oldest (by a small margin) fire engine. Apart from it being in the Bathurst, NSW region for a long time I have no knowledge of it's provenance. It is missing the Gwynne pump, tie rod and steering arms, engine, and other details. As cab seen the wooden wheels have been sawn off at the hubs. The front right wheel looks like it might have come off a car (had a 24-5.00 tyre on it). I can't locate the chassis list on the Surrey County archives so if any one could help I would be grateful. Steven
  11. mammoth

    WW1 finds and discoveries

    Leyland "modernised" their range of RAF types around 1925 by having equal diameter back and front, with 850mm for the 4, 5, & 6 tonners and 770mm for the 2 & 3 tonners. The advert from 1928 demonstrates that you could drive in and get new tyre bands pressed on while you waited. tye advert.pdf
  12. mammoth

    WW1 finds and discoveries

    850mm dia rims. So is English and not American (who used imperial sizes). The axle is obviously home made so not a reference point..
  13. mammoth

    1914 Dennis Lorry

    I have one of the hand ones and it does work. The pedal operated ones are worth the extra money as not only can you get extra pressure (or same pressure for longer) but you have got both hands to control the metal. There are also some available with a deeper throat.
  14. mammoth

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    I have an almost identical (but smaller) lamp bracket in my 1923 Leyland. The flat portion has a sand cast finish on the back while the rest clearly bears marks consistent with a forge power hammer with a rectangular tool of, say, 3/4" on the narrow edge. The ears have been bent up during the forge process. Also noted are the marks of a heavy handed grinding wheel.
  15. mammoth

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Malleable iron is cast iron heat treated so it doesn't fracture - remember when all motorbikes were constructed with straight pipes joined with malleable cast iron head stock, bottom bracket, etc
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