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singaeger

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About singaeger

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  1. Parking on the side of the road, I've fitted an simple keyed ignition switch in the ignition circuit. if left for longer periods I remove the steering wheel if longer still, I remove the rotor arm, battery, and sometimes one or two the wheels to be stored elsewhere
  2. Attended last years event at North Weald. Was a really enjoyable day and well worth making the effort
  3. Thefollowing extracts are from the home office Guide on Firearms Licensing Law April 2016. I suggest that anyone fromoutside the UK should not attempt to bring deactivated weapons as they arelikely to have trouble if inspected at the border. EU Firearms Deactivation Regulation 2.21 An EU ImplementingRegulation establishing common guidelines on deactivation standards andtechniques for ensuring that deactivated firearms are rendered irreversiblyinoperable will come into force on 8 April 2016. This places a new level ofstandard for deactivating firearms across the EU. The new standards shall notapply to firearms deactivated prior to 8 April 2016 (when the Regulation comesinto effect) unless those firearms are transferred to another Member State orplaced on the market. The Proof Houses will be applying these standards tofirearms submitted to them on or after 8 April 2016. A link to the Implementing Regulation 2015/2403 is attached here. 2.22 Further informationwill be made available on the .GOV website. A link to the firearms pages isattached: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/firearms-licensing-police-guidance Deactivated Firearms 28.11 CommissionImplementing Regulation (EU) 2015/2403 introduced EU-wide standards fordeactivated firearms and an EU Deactivation Certificate. To ensure thatdeactivated firearms are compliant with this legislation, from 8th April 2016,an import licence will be required for the import or transfer into the UK of adeactivated firearm. There is no exemption from the need for an import licencefor deactivated firearms manufactured on or before 31 December 1899. An importlicence will be required for each shipment along with a transfer licence issuedby the exporting Member State. The only acceptable proof that a firearm isdeactivated is an EU Deactivation Certificate. No other DeactivationCertificate will be accepted. 28.12 Re-enactors willbe able to apply for a three year import licence provided you have the new EUCertificate of deactivation and are a member of a re-enactment society when youattend the overseas re-enactment event. Separate import licences will berequired for EU and non-EU events
  4. Responce from Catherine Bearder MEP................ Dear Constituent, Thank you for your email about possible changes to firearms regulation in the European Union (EU). The European Commission has recently announced two sets of proposals about firearms. Firstly, on 2nd December the Commission adopted a package of measures to step up the fight against terrorism and the illegal trafficking of firearms and explosives. Although I would welcome more details on the plans, I am minded to support these proposals. However, there are also plans announced in November that are more wide ranging and, judging by the amount of correspondence I have received since, not supported by many people. The Commission has tabled proposals to amend the Firearms Directive to make it more difficult to acquire firearms, including deactivated firearms by: - Stricter conditions for the online acquisition of firearms, to avoid the acquisition of firearms, pieces thereof or munition through the Internet; - Stricter rules to ban certain semi-automatic firearms, which move from Category B to Category A and will not, under any circumstances, be allowed to be held by private persons, even if they have been permanently deactivated; - The inclusion of blank-firing weapons (e.g. alarm, signaling, life-saving weapons) in the scope of the Directive, because of their potential to be transformed into firearms. - Further restrictions to the use and circulation of deactivated firearms. National registries should keep records of deactivated firearms and their owners. Under no circumstances will civilians be authorised to own any of the most dangerous firearms falling under Category A (e.g. a Kalashnikov), which is currently possible if they have been deactivated. The enforcement of the ban is a national responsibility, and Member States have all necessary tools at their disposal including the destruction of illegally held deactivated arms; - Collectors, as defined by national law, are currently excluded from the scope of the Directive. The Commission is proposing today to change this, since collectors have been identified as a possible source of traffic of firearms. In the future, collectors will have the possibility to acquire firearms, but subject to the same authorisation/declaration requirements as private persons. - Brokers will be brought into the scope of the Directive, since they provide services similar to those of dealers. Member States will have to introduce regulation covering the registration, licensing and/or authorisation of brokers and dealers operating within their territory. The Commission also wants tighter rules on marking of firearms to improve the traceability of weapons by making them harder to erase (e.g. by affixing markings on the receiver), extending the obligation to imported firearms and clarifying on which components the marking should be affixed. Member States will have to keep the data until the destruction of the firearm (i.e. not only for 20 years as currently the case) – and better exchange of information between Member States, for example on any refusal of authorisation decided by another national authority, interconnection of national registers to ensure full European cooperation, and obligations for dealers and brokers to connect their registers to national registers. Regarding deactivation, this package of measures also includes an Implementing Regulation imposing stringent minimum common guidelines for the deactivation of firearms which will render reactivation much more difficult. The Firearms Directive specifies that weapons which have been rendered unfit for use are no longer considered firearms but pieces of metal which can move freely within the internal market without authorization/declaration. However, recent experience shows that deactivated arms can be illegally reactivated by using pieces from other deactivated arms, home-made pieces or pieces acquired via the Internet. The fact that there is no harmonised way to deactivate weapons across the EU increases the security risk. To solve this problem, the Commission has prepared a Regulation that sets out common, strict, harmonised criteria on how Member States must deactivate weapons so they are rendered unfit to use. This is complemented by the ban on the possession of Category A firearms – even when they are deactivated. The Implementing Regulation is based on the criteria for deactivation developed by the Permanent International Commission for the Proof of Small Arms (the CIP). The Commission has been negotiating this Implementing Regulation with Member States since April 2015 in the context of the comitology procedure, with discussions intensifying in the last few weeks. The draft text sent to Member States on Friday 13 November was adopted in committee on 18 November, following which the College adopted the implementing act on the same day. In summary, the proposed revision of the Firearms Directive will debated by European Parliament and Council in the near future. I understand the Commission are hoping its plans will be approved and come into effect by July 2016. I can assure you I will be monitoring the proposals closely. Although I think the EU needs to play its part in the fight against crime and terrorism, I will not support over-regulation and a knee-jerk reaction. Yours sincerely, Catherine Bearder MEP Liberal Democrat member of the European Parliament for the South East of England Constituency Office 27 Park End Street Oxford OX1 1HU +44 1865 249838 http://www.bearder.eu
  5. The BASC now have a terrific link to an auto generating email to all your local MPs regarding the proposed EU Firearms Directive change fiasco. The body text of the email is very shooter/hunter biased but you can make as many changes as you want (to include deactivated firearms, re-enacting and airsoft hobbies for example) but if you don't want to make changes that is okay too. Main thing is that as many emails get sent to these MPs as possible http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=1979&ea.campaign.id=47315
  6. How many photos of dingos in service do the RCA museum have? might be interested in a swap photos for a rotor....I have a few spare. does it need to be the Rev limiter type I also have the fixed alternative cheers 'Singe' http://www.daimler-fighting-vehicles.co.uk/
  7. Any chance a posting something generic here that we all can use as a basis of our own assesmnent? thanks singe
  8. Here a thread with photos of em http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/showthread.php?46928-WW2-British-Airbourne-Handcart-wheels&p=425323#post425323 im in Dartford Kent.
  9. I've got two airborne wheels if these are of any use
  10. What happens if you give the fuel pump a few squeezes with the priming lever? does that not push a few more drops of fuel past the valve
  11. Rick are these you new helpers? http://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Auxiliary_Territorial_Service#/image/File:Auxiliary_Territorial_Service_(ATS)_women_working_on_a_Churchill_tank_at_a_Royal_Army_Ordnance_Corps_depot,_10_October_1942._H24517.jpg
  12. Just to clarify. with my carb fitted and plugs and timing reset it had a very crisp throttle response with no hesitancy what'soever. with the original carb, it. accelerated but more sluggishly and appeared to have a flat spot from low rev acceleration. Swapped my float bowl (where most of the jets live) and made of noticeable difference. After changing the seal in the carb top and replacing the original float bowl things were better but still not as good as my carb. However drove it down the lane quite easily and as final test pulled away from a standing start in 4th gear. The engine pulled cleanly through the revs with no problem so the car is quite drivable. I understand it had before only managed 100 feet before it conked out before. with regards the plug these were the original lodges with WD stamps.... God knows how long they had been in the engine and no wonder they were not helping the engine to run well. thanks for an entertaining day Mike & Chris (and free fry up from your mother in law). If you need any help again please get in touch. Singe
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