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  • Birthday 01/01/1951

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  1. I appreciate this is very much a long shot, but can anyone on here suggest the origin of these markings I have uncovered on a wartime jerrycan? It is just personal curiosity, no particular other reason. The top line maybe shows (Fo)rdson, the central larger letters appear to be either REGS or RFGS, there are some serial numbers in much smaller letters, then lastly the lower lines have a top indestinct line maybe followed by ....rican
  2. Very interesting to read your perspective SimonBrown.
  3. They look like Bedford MW to me.
  4. I came across this while searching the web. It shows ranks of tanks being stored prior to being decommissioned, this photo dates from 1953. A few pounds worth there!
  5. I think you have had all the areas covered so I've nothing to add except to re-affirm what Citroman said about the rubbing with bar soap, it works on cast ally as well but be careful not to overheat it - just to the point of 'blacking'. Then steady pressure with shaped blocks and clamps. Re-heat as often as required but don't forget to resoap it.
  6. Hi Andy I think you will find that most British Ex-WD bikes fetch similar money for bikes in similar condition so you go for the one that takes your fancy. But in terms of 'comfort' (that term used very considerately 🙂 ) then possibly the Matchless was the one most favoured by the wartime squaddies as it has tele forks. That said, by far the most used was the BSA, with 3 out of every 4 wartime bikes being a product of Birmingham's finest ! I'd go for a Beeza every time, if only because parts are still obtainable and they are comparitively easy bikes to work on and there is a first rate website forum devoted to these bikes. I wouldn't spend money on a Norton as the 16H was an old fashioned bugger by 1939 and they are not to be viewed through the same rose tinted specs as such as a Manx is. Other guys will tell you different. Steve makes a fair point about originality, but you can still buy (at a price) original BSA parts so it is possible to 'keep the faith'.
  7. I reckon if someone can recognise the type of distinctive 'wheel spat' on the aircraft in the background it might tie it closely down to one site or another by the shared Squadron types? Over to the aircraft recognition experts.
  8. Yes, I mistakenly thought on a quick scan that it was up for viewing. No matter. I've seen the other one as it does also show for me.
  9. Out of curiosity, what paint type do you use Steve?
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