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Asciidv

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About Asciidv

  • Rank
    Warrant Officer 2nd Class

Personal Information

  • Location
    Northumberland
  • Interests
    Dennis Fire Engines
  • Homepage
    http://www.dennisfire.co.uk

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  1. Asciidv

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Mammoth , Stick with the Mercedes engine, it will be far easier for you.........and let me have this Dennis engine!🤗🤗🤗 What a find! I wonder whether it is just a teaser or whether it could change hands? Best wishes, Barry.
  2. Asciidv

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Andy, I think it looks like a soldered up brass header tank but built as a replica of a cast aluminium top tank. Very unusual and unique! Barry.
  3. Asciidv

    1911 Dennis Fire Engine 3035

    Steven, This is my 1913 Dennis. The points of interest is that it does not use the White and Poppe engine with the four separate cylinders but a two block engine with thermo-syphon cooling. The fire fighting pump is not the larger size found on the later 'N' types but a smaller Gwynne. The standard piston primer is contained in the rear locker, but it is just single unit and not paired up as on the 'N' Types. The radiator cap mascot has no relevance to the discussion, but what a super mascot for a Dennis! (The brochure extract is my actual machine as it was originally supplied to the John Dickinson works fire brigade. You will notice that there has been a change of radiator and wheels). Barry.
  4. Asciidv

    1914 Dennis Lorry

    Ben, where did this bit of red come from? The belt pulleys seem quite some way out on an unsupported shaft. For a moment I thought that you might have mounted an auxiliary bearing on the fan bracket to give extra support. When you tensioned the belts did the pulley shaft flex at all? Are we going to see pictures here of the adventure that the lorry had a few days ago! Barry.
  5. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Ed, I would just pull off each plug cap in turn and listen for a change in engine note to see if I was missing on a cylinder. Is a 'Cylinder balance Power Check' anything more sophisticated? On my early Dennis's charging a cylinder beforehand and then returning up to a couple of hours later is like you say a real 'party piece'. The Dennis's have trembler coils so we have plenty of sparks to set alight the remaining mixture. Barry.
  6. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    This was in the era when the F1 rules permitted either 3 litre normally aspirated engines or 1.5 litre turbo engines. The turbo engines ran with tremendous boost so although they started off with only 500 BHP by the end of the development they were producing close to 900BHP. The BMW engine programme was run on a shoestring with them making do with whatever they had available. Stress relieved old blocks were therefore essential to the campaign. However, we are talking about a Thornycroft here, so hone out the bores, skim the pistons, perhaps increase the ring gaps too and enjoy happy motoring with 50 trouble free horses.
  7. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Yes, later models were not fitted with the trembler coil. This is how it can be started without B.E.N. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivN1FNsrCsI
  8. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    I don't know if I know how to do that........ Here is a video of another starting system called B.E.N. https://youtu.be/KwZL-JDnBuY
  9. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    I was intrigued by the last post from Ed. I have a 1913 Merryweather fire engine where starting is quite difficult, due to the engine size and compression. In the U.K. starter/generators are called DynaStarts. The advantage being is that the belt drive is permanently engaged and once you have used the 'Start' part of the unit the 'Dyna' part charges your battery. For the Thorny and my size of engine (10 litres) you need quite a big DynaStart. There is a man on ebay specialising in Dynastarters for our type of application and typically sells 10 sets a year. The best belt to use is a 'Polyvee' belt, which you see wrapped around serpentine like on all the Front End Auxiliary Drives on large car engines. These are like 4 or more tiny vee belts all joined together side by side. A pulley ratio of 6:1 will give a torque of 60 ft lbs at the crank. How does that compare with Steve giving the hand crank a good swing? Probably about the same? Anyway, I think I am going to give it a try. The seller will accept everything back if it doesn't work and give an 80% refund which seems quite fair. The great advantage of this type of unit is that you don't have to fit a starter gear ring to the flywheel or do any machining at all. With luck the DynaStarter can just be clamped onto chassis rails without any hole drilling, so the system can be removed without leaving any traces behind if you wish to go back to complete originality.
  10. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    60 miles to Brighton and then crawling through traffic the last few miles to the sea front on may be a roasting hot day would send shivers down my spine if I knew my engine was likely to seize. Like Gordon has just said I think it would be far safer to pull off the barrels first thing tomorrow morning and take a look. With a hone you could ease out each cylinder a thou or two in minutes compared with hours of running at tickover. You could have the barrels back on by lunch time confident that you will be eating ice creams on the sea front next Sunday!
  11. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Steve, did I miss the bit where you dynamically balanced the prop shaft up to 1000rpm before fitting? My local Fire Brigade workshops were fixated on prop shaft balancing but to me it always seemed unnecessary compared with the other rotating masses which could be out of balance.
  12. Asciidv

    1914 Dennis Lorry

    Ben, are you going to use a sheet metal shrinker to take the ripples out of the turned over lip on the roof or do you have some other plan? I have been looking at one of these for years and could never decide whether they are any good or not. Does anyone here have any experiences of using one of these?
  13. Asciidv

    1914 Dennis Lorry

    When I have made up oil pipes for pressure gauges I have always just soft soldered the nipples on and not silver solder like what Ben has just used. On this era of vehicle ( pre-WW1 ) was there a preferred method? Looking forward to hear the engine start. Engine starts seem to be coming thick and fast now!
  14. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Well, there is Ben, Me and you, so we only need 17 more to make the numbers up!
  15. Asciidv

    WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Timing diagram from a 1920’s 4 cylinder SV engine of 3 litre capacity. Still not radically different.
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