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Doc

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About Doc

  • Rank
    Lance Corporal

Personal Information

  • Location
    Bristol and Suffolk
  • Interests
    Pre-1920 tractors, motor rollers, lorries.
  • Occupation
    Chemical Engineer

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  1. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    As one of the fortunate few who can walk across the yard to get to the workshop, I feel duty bound to share with those who cannot in these unusual times. So here's some pictures from earlier this year re-fitting the clutch. Flywheel painted, ready to receive clutch components. Grease applied to mating face. In with the clutch cone. Followed by the cover... and the spring. Winding in the spring adjuster with the new laser cut spanner. Note the grub screw and locking slot in the adjuster. Clutch release bearing, stop, lock nut, spacer and repaired retaining bolt for the drive coupling. Retaining bolt had deep gouges as a result of having been undone with a hammer and cold chisel. These have been welded up and filed back to shape. And back in position. New 3/8"BSF nuts and bolts from Trojan Special Fasteners at Birmingham. Pedal shaft and bearings ready for lifting into position... Pedal shaft in position. Thanks to my brother David for being a second pair of hands. Clutch stop and drive coupling fitted.
  2. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    I've been encouraged to share a few more details of the punching machine. So here you go... Close-up of the front of the turret: smallest punch is 1/8"and largest punch is 1/2" Full range of punches available. Can punch 1/2" diameter through 1/8" material. Doesn't say what material! Side View It sees a lot of use nibbling out gaskets, though you would never know as I swept up before taking the photographs.
  3. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    So despite (or possibly because of) these uncertain times, I have found time to go into the workshop. Stopping short of rubber solution and sticky back plastic, I did my best "Blue Peter" and made a cardboard prototype handle for my repaired valve-chest cover. Kellogs "Fruit and Fibre", though other cereal boxes can also be used. Cut four blanks out of mild steel and punched the rivet holes using a natty little turret punch. Punch was found on the heap at our local scrapyard. Next to the fly-press and bent to shape. Two handles riveted into place. (1 coat of red-oxide primer on the mating faces first). Then a coat of red oxide all over. While I had the brush in the pot, the silencer brackets got a coat too!
  4. Evening. Funny how most things yield when you show them the hydraulic puller. Pretty sure the part you require is on one of my brother's spare engines. Once movement restrictions have been relaxed you'll be able to come see for yourself. Was tidying my desk at work this week in preparation for "working from home" and stumbled across the list of new felt seals I had made for David's lorry. So, when the time comes, give me a shout and I can send you the list and put you on to the company that made them, or I can get them for you. Regards Doc (Andy)
  5. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    So, via a circuitous route, I've been introduced to Geoff Lumb from Huddersfield. Whilst we have yet to meet, we've had long conversations by telephone. He's clearly spent an awful long time immersed in all things Clayton & Co and Karrier. Geoff was present when my lorry was recovered from Manor Farm in 1977. In the photograph below, he's the gentleman on the right of the picture. Does anyone recognise any of the other faces? Am feeling extremely grateful right now as Geoff has sent me this drawing of a "Petrol Motor Lurry To Carry 4 Tons" based on the Karrier chassis, and given me permission to reproduce the drawing here. Not only is the drawing fully dimensioned, but it also indicates the different timbers used in the construction, including Ash, Oak, Birch and Red Deal. I have re-drawn the lurry body in Autocad and superimposed it on the drawing of my chassis. The chassis length in this drawing matches mine! This is the first concrete evidence I have found of different chassis lengths. Also reassuring that when my chassis was repaired all those years ago, it was done to the original specification. Just look at the sizes of the timbers: Longitudinal Runners 6" x 3" x 10'9" long. Floorboards 1.1/2" thick Red Deal. Front Bolster 3" x 11.1/2" x 6'6", Rear Bolster 3" x 12.7/8" x 6'6" Headboard has 3 off 7" x 1" x 78" Oak planks and 1 off 9" x 2" Ash Rail. I assume that all other framing was Ash. Note: the body slopes up towards the back by 1.3/8" or approximately 1 degree. Curious. Am also working on a Solidworks 3d cad model of the body which may appear on here in due course.
  6. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Valve chest covers. Earlier engines were fitted with cast iron valve chest covers, but by the time my engine, #6616 had been built these had given way to pressed steel. Cost reduction is not just a modern phenomenon. The rust moth laid her eggs on them and it seems most hatched! That said, there was enough metal present to make one out of the remains of the two. The second will need to be made from scratch. Many thanks to Stuart for changing the gas on the TIG welder from Ar to Ar/CO2 mix and staying late after work to do the welding for me. Rotten corner excised from the "good" valve chest cover. Donor and remains Copper heat sinks clamped in place First tack welds Nice neat weld under trying circumstances - thanks, Stuart! After fettling with the Dremel Weld peened with a blunted dot punch to blend it in to the rust pitted substrate. Note there's two folded handles required. These were rivetted into position (rivet holes visible in this picture.
  7. Marcel, My brother only has the lathe and the switchboard. Switchboard is Austin and has W^D on one of the meters. Differs from the Duxford example in that it is open, not in a cabinet. Also the voltage regulator is built into the panel whereas the Duxford example has the voltage regulator bolted onto the dynamo. We understand it was discovered in a motor repair garage. May have been W^D surplus equipment, re-purposed. Or may have been constructed by Austin for civilian use, using surplus W^D components. He is looking for the following tools: Silver Mfg Co No 24 drill Luke & Spencer grinder Wolf electric drill & stand He also needs an Austin 8 hp, 4 cylinder T-head radiator cooled 110v generating set with 3.5 kw dynamo and shunt regulator. Regards Doc
  8. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    So I was hunting around online and came across this short video clip: https://www.pond5.com/stock-footage/item/87607821-dennis-and-karrier-trucks-parked-road-1918 This rang some bells... going back through some of the "Motor Traction" adverts on Page 1 of this thread, there's an advert for reconditioned AEC, Karrier and Dennis lorries, from which I've clipped a paragraph (below): Advert is from September 6th, 1920.
  9. So at "Woolpit Steam" last year, my brother got a lead on a Drummond lathe of the correct pattern for his workshop body. The deal was that we had to find an equivalent lathe to replace it - it was still being used. So a slightly more up-to-date Boxford with all the ancillaries was duly found, dismantled and delivered to its new home. The Boxford was reassembled on site, meanwhile the Drummond was stripped and loaded in the back of the car. This has been thoroughly paraffin washed and allowed to dry before applying linseed oil to bring up the original paintwork. He has a 3-jaw and 4-jaw chuck as per the original specification, though not sure they are the originals, also the face-plate and a steady that can either be fixed or travelling. There's also a selection of change wheels, but not the complete set. These do turn up - patience is required. This lathe looks to have never has a treadle fitted. He is missing the original 110V dc motor, also the cast iron knee that supported it. However, everything else is in wonderful order. There's even the ASC requisition plate below the makers' plate. The weather was clement in Suffolk today and with the aid of our neighbour's fork-lift, the lathe was lifted into place. Preparing for the lift. This platform / side panel was the one which had the hole for the stove-pipe cut through. Note the temporary roof. Shelter from the sun (and rain!) at GDSF 2018. Carefully lifting into position. Note "War Finish" stencil on the end of the bed, just above the leg. Final position. Dimensions measured from the body at Duxford. Many thanks to the curatorial team there, who have been extremely helpful and accommodating.
  10. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Steve, Thank-you for the contact details and encouragement. I've taken a look at Diane's website - her work looks first class! Doc
  11. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Thank-you for the recommendation. If you can PM me Diane's contact details that would be great. I'm now curious to know what patent details are referenced on the plate. Am wondering if it relates to Spurrier's torque tube patent GB190316919 (Lancashire Steam Motor Company, Leyland). Time will tell...
  12. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Ed, Thank-you. My torque tube has two small holes about two inches apart - must have had a similar brass plate. No doubt the rust got behind it and forced it off. Any chance of a rubbing of the plate? Perhaps I could get a reproduction one made. I do have this plate from the near-side chassis rail: The corners are damaged so I've soft soldered it to a brass backing plate to allow me to re-fit it to the chassis. Doc.
  13. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Ed, I noticed the following statement in your 2008 topic (bold emphasis mine): Chassis is in very good order having been kept dry all its life, not sure where to look for a chassis number - any ideas? There is one small brass plate on the prop shaft tube relating to a patent if I remember correctly. I believe axles are in their original locations but it looks like 2' has been chopped off chassis just behind rear spring hangers. Don't now why as wooden body extends beyond this. Any chance you can look out the patent number from the brass plate? While you're there, can you confirm the orientation of the bung for oiling the prop-shaft front bearing? See attached photographs... Oil bung #11077 shown at top My oil bung (removed in this picture) at the four o-clock position. Has there been a clarity / artistic license decision in the parts list, or is my torque tube orientation incorrect? Perhaps when I remove this part there may be witness marks visible on the spherical head. Thanks Doc
  14. Steve, Thanks for sharing this. How to do the job safely without hurting yourself or anyone else. I tend not to like a loud "Boing" followed by the inevitable search for whatever went flying round the workshop. Doc
  15. Doc

    Karrier WDS

    Steering Box Another item looking rather sorry for itself. The ribbed structure of the upper half of the steering box has formed a water trap. 40 years on and the rust had returned. One stubborn bolt refused to budge, so was drilled out. First wash revealed nothing particularly scary. Shafts run in hardened steel bushes. Ball thrust bearings were fitted either side of the worm. Everything was washed in paraffin, de-rusted with a variety of wire brushes of different sizes. Phosphate conversion coating was applied prior to painting. Steering box removed from the chassis Bolts removed. Stubborn one drilled and punched out, cover off, revealing the innards. After first wash. (Image has decided to rotate itself - who knows why!) Phosphate conversion coating. Red oxide primer, second coat. Cold night in the painting shed, so brought parts into the warm to dry. Under coat. Reassembly commences: Steering segment, shaft and bushes in place. Followed by worm, steering column shaft and ball thrusts. Top half of casing in place And finally the steering column.
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