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Noel7

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About Noel7

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  • Location
    Bristol
  • Interests
    Model railways, circa 1960
  • Occupation
    Retired.

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  1. All of the pictures posted are of vehicles with number plates which are consistent in style [some white on black, some black on white, admittedly] and location, with the exception of the ambulance in the Italian one, which has a number painted on in a more or less random location, partly across the Red Cross marking. At seven digits it seems too long to be a VRN. It may well be a census number, I don't know, but the presence of an Arabic version of the number implies it was added whilst the vehicle was still in north Africa, as there would be no need for it in Italy, which may affect the dating. It also implies, I think, that the vehicle had no number plate when it was done, as the Arabic version of the number plate would make the Arabic version of the longer number unnecessary [I'm assuming that the Arabic version is for the benefit of Egyptian civil police].
  2. The website "License Plates of the World" shows under "Egypt" a black on a white plate with red vertical central bar [matching the style in the second picture] captioned as 'British Forces 1930-1945'. It's described as a replica, and oddly has different numbers in English and Arabic; those in the two photos are the same numbers in both scripts. The two 1930s-1940s civilian plates shown on the website are white on black, in different styles. Military vehicles in Britain had civilian registration plates until early in WW2, as well as census numbers, and some at least kept them for some time, although new vehicles no longer had them allocated. My suggestion would be that something similar happened in Egypt, where the UK had administrative control, so that pre-war and early wartime vehicles in Egypt had civilian style plates and kept them, at least in some cases, but no more were allocated to arrivals after some point in late 1939/early 1940.
  3. Thanks both. Longmoor is a bit restricted from the railway point of view, unfortunately, so not for me, I'm afraid. I remember from childhood stations with 3T GS and sometimes other vehicles waiting outside for National Service arrivals or people returning from leave, or to collect stores, and have noticed from contemporary photos how often military, or ex-military, vehicles appeared on railway vehicles. The railway seems to have carried whole trainloads of identical vehicles on occasion [presumably vehicles being returned to stores or their replacements, vehicles being taken to a disposal site or vehicles issued to TA units for exercises], but this is not really practical in model terms. It also sometimes carried smaller numbers [to/from TA units?] and unregistered individual vehicles, presumably from a disposal site, either of which is much more achievable. Census numbers had disappeared by the period I'm interested in, replaced by 1949 series numbers. Vehicles from BA [armour] and BC [softskin] were, so far as I know, new vehicles, though, and never carried census numbers. Anything originally allocated a census number would have been in the Rx, Xx, Yx or Zx series, like the very first batch of Land Rovers for the army, ordered in 1948, which were in 90YJxx.
  4. Thanks, Wally. My interest is B and C vehicles; some A vehicles did travel by rail in the UK in the late 1950s, as they still do, but usually in train loads, whereas B vehicles especially were much more likely to appear in small numbers, both on rail wagons and on street, which is simpler to model in restricted spaces. I have been able to trace rebuild numbers into xxRHxx and early 1952 (the highest I have been able to identify so far, from a photo, is 66RH15). After that this series apparently went out of use and rebuilds continued to carry the original number on the chassis (from the X*, Y* and ZA-ZC series). Thanks for the confirmation about the registers; I assume that these were one per number series and only one, or at most a very small number of copies, so unlikely still to exist now?
  5. Good afternoon. Having recently joined, domestic matters have delayed this post, in which time I did post once, which I hope you will excuse. I do not own any vehicles, nor, given my age am I likely to, but have been a visitor to this Forum for some time, before joining. I am a modeller, primarily of railways, but am aware that military vehicles were seen on and around the railways of the UK in my period of interest [circa 1960] and thought that it would be interesting to show this in model terms. This led to questions of what types of vehicles, with what markings, and what VRNs. The VRN part of this has rather taken on a life of its own, and gone way beyond what I actually needed. However, I have never come across any reference to a listing of VRNs by type of vehicle for the 1949 series, and something of the sort must presumably have existed. I would like to find out more about this, if possible. Noel
  6. I'm no expert, but it looks as though it is a version of the classical Chinese character for "Fist" (Quan), what Europeans call 'Boxers' being known to Chinese by a name which translates as 'Righteous Harmonious Fists'. Modern printed Chinese (Pinyin) uses a different character set.
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